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Strona Główna Blues Down Home Blues Down Home Blues - Memphis & The South 1949-1954 CD2 (2007)

Down Home Blues - Memphis & The South 1949-1954 CD2 (2007)

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Down Home Blues - Memphis & The South 1949-1954 CD2 (2007)

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01. Papa Lightfoot – Wine, Whiskey & Women
02. Jerry McCain – Love To Make Up
03. Joe Hill Louis – Joe’s Jump
04. Lightning Slim – Ethel Mae
05. Big Joe Williams – His Spirit Lives On
06. Louis Campbell – Don’t Want Anyone Hanging Round
07. Lightning Slim – Rock Me Mama
08. Schoolboy Cleve – Strange Letter Blues
09. Willie Love – Nelson St. Blues
10. Boogie Bill Webb – I Ain’t For It
11. Papa Lightfoot – P.L.Blues `
12. Lightning Slim – New Orleans Bound
13. Little Sam Davis – She’s So Good To Me
14. Luther Huff – Dirty Disposition
15. Country Jim – Old River Blues
16. Jerry McCain – East Of The Sun
17. John Lee – Alabama Boogie
18. Percy Lee Crudup - Tears In My Eyes
19. Dr.Ross – Dr.Ross Boogie
20. Willie Nix – Just One Mistake
21. Lightning Slim – I Can’t Live Happy
22. Big Joe Williams – Married Woman Blues
23. Country Jim – Sad And Lonely
24. John Lee – Down At The Depot
25. Joe Hill Louis – Railroad Blues
26. Boogie Bill Webb – Bad Dog
27. John Lee – Baby’s Blues

 

Memphis blues was discovered by the rest of the world largely via the works of Beale Street-based bandleader W. C. Handy, who began using blues motifs in his compositions shortly after encountering the music in the Mississippi Delta around 1903. By the 1920s many musicians from Mississippi had relocated here to perform in local theaters, cafes, and parks. The mix of rural and urban musical traditions and songs from traveling minstrel and medicine shows led to the creation of new blues styles, and record companies set up temporary studios at the Peabody Hotel and other locations to capture the sounds of Mississippians who came to town to record, such as Tommy Johnson and Mississippi John Hurt, as well as some who had settled in Memphis, including Robert Wilkins, Jim Jackson, Gus Cannon, Memphis Minnie, and Joe McCoy.

In the decade following World War II musicians from around the Mid South descended upon Memphis, and their interactions resulted in the revolutionary new sounds of R&B and rock ’n’ roll. Riley King arrived from Indianola and soon became known as the “Beale Street Blues Boy,” later shortened to “B. B.” Many of King’s first performances were at talent shows at the Palace Theater, 324 Beale, co-hosted by Rufus Thomas, a native of Cayce, Mississippi, who, like King, later worked as a deejay at WDIA. King and Thomas were among the many Mississippi-born artists who recorded at Sam Phillips’s Memphis Recording Service, where Tupelo’s Elvis Presley made his historic first recordings for Phillips’s Sun label in 1954. The soul music era arrived with the Stax and Hi labels in the 1960s, and again many Mississippians were at the forefront: Stax’s roster included Little Milton, Albert King, Rufus Thomas, and Roebuck “Pops” Staples, while Hi producer and bandleader Willie Mitchell, a native of Ashland, oversaw recordings by soul and blues artists Otis Clay, Syl Johnson, Big Lucky Carter, Big Amos (Patton), and others with Mississippi roots. ---msbluestrail.org

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