Muzyka Klasyczna The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/klasyczna/2585.html Tue, 25 Jan 2022 19:09:04 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management pl-pl Beethoven Violin Concerto & Mozart Violin Concerto No.4 (Oistrakh) [2001] http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/klasyczna/2585-david-a-igor-oistrakh/11649-beethoven-violin-concerto-a-mozart-violin-concerto-no4-oistrakh.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/klasyczna/2585-david-a-igor-oistrakh/11649-beethoven-violin-concerto-a-mozart-violin-concerto-no4-oistrakh.html Beethoven Violin Concerto & Mozart Violin Concerto No.4 (Oistrakh) [2001]

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Ludwig van Beethoven - Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 61
1 	1. Allegro ma non troppo 	23:32
2 	2. Larghetto 	8:34
3 	3. Rondo. Allegro 	10:12

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart - Violin Concerto No. 4 in D major, K. 218
4 	1. Allegro 	9:02
5 	2. Andante cantabile 	7:38
6 	3. Rondeau. Andante grazioso 	7:56

David Oistrakh – violin
Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra
Kirill Kondrashin – conductor

 

David Oistrakh is considered the premiere violinist of the mid-twentieth century Soviet Union. His recorded legacy includes nearly the entire standard violin repertory up to and including Prokofiev and Bartók. Oistrakh's violin studies began in 1913 with the famed teacher Pyotr Stolyarsky. Later he officially joined Stolyarsky's class at the Odessa Conservatory, graduating in 1926 by playing Prokofiev's First Violin Concerto. Performances of the Glazunov Concerto in Odessa and Kiev in 1927, and a 1928 debut in Leningrad (Tchaikovsky Concerto) gave Oistrakh the confidence to move to Moscow. He made his premiere there in early 1929, but the event went largely unnoticed. In 1934, however, after several years of patiently refining his craft, Oistrakh was invited to join the Moscow Conservatory, eventually rising to the rank of full professor in 1939.

Meanwhile, Oistrakh was gaining success on the competition circuit, winning the All-Ukrainian contest in 1930, and the All-Soviet competition three years later. In 1935 he took second prize at the Wieniawski competition. In 1937 the Soviet government sent the now veteran violinist to Brussels to compete in the International Ysaÿe Competition, where he took home first prize.

With his victory in Brussels, Soviet composers began to take notice of their young compatriot, enabling Oistrakh to work closely with Miaskovsky and Khachaturian on their concertos in 1939 and 1940, respectively. In addition, his close friendship with Shostakovich led the composer to write two concertos for the instrument (the first of which Oistrakh played at his, and its, triumphant American premiere in 1955). During the 1940s Oistrakh's active performing schedule took him across the Soviet Union but his international career had to wait until the 1950s, when the political climate had cooled enough for Soviet artists to be welcomed in the capitals of the West.

The remaining decades of Oistrakh's life were devoted to maintaining the highest possible standards of excellence throughout an exhausting touring schedule (he returned to the U.S. six times in the 1960s), and he began a small but successful sideline career as an orchestral conductor. His death came suddenly in Amsterdam in 1974, during a cycle of Brahms concerts in which he both played and conducted. Oistrakh's unexpected death left a void in the Soviet musical world which was never really filled.

Throughout his career David Oistrakh was known for his honest, warm personality; he developed close friendships with many of the leading musicians of the day. His violin technique was virtually flawless, though he never allowed purely physical matters to dominate his musical performances. He always demanded of himself (and his students) that musical proficiency, intelligence, and emotion be in balance, regardless of the particular style. Oistrakh felt that a violinist's essence was communicated through clever and subtle use of the bow, and not through overly expressive use of vibrato. To this end he developed a remarkably relaxed, flexible right arm technique, capable of producing the most delicate expressive nuances, but equally capable of generating great volume and projection.

As a teacher, David Oistrakh maintained that a teacher should do no more than necessary to help guide the student towards his or her own solutions to technical and interpretive difficulties. He rarely played during lessons, fearing that he might distract the student from developing a more individual approach, and even encouraged his students to challenge his interpretations. Perhaps the best evidence of the Oistrakh's gift for teaching is that he felt that he gained as much from the teaching experience as his students did. ---Blair Johnston, allmusic.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) David & Igor Oistrakh Sat, 11 Feb 2012 15:55:38 +0000
David & Igor Oistrach – Duets (2000) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/klasyczna/2585-david-a-igor-oistrakh/9400-david-a-igor-oistrach-duets.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/klasyczna/2585-david-a-igor-oistrakh/9400-david-a-igor-oistrach-duets.html David & Igor Oistrakh – Duets (2000)

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Antonio Vivaldi: Concerto grosso for 2 violins, strings and continuo in A minor, Op.3/8 , RV 522
1. Concerto grosso for 2 violins, strings and continuo in A minor, Allegro 3:58
2. Concerto grosso for 2 violins, strings and continuo in A minor, Larghetto 4:24
3. Concerto grosso for 2 violins, strings and continuo in A minor, Allegro 4:00

J. S. Bach: Sonata in C, BWV 1037 Anh.III 187
4. Sonata in C, BWV 1037 Anh.III 187 - 1. Adagio 4:29		play
5. Sonata in C, BWV 1037 Anh.III 187 - 2. Allabreve 2:53
6. Sonata in C, BWV 1037 Anh.III 187 - 3. Alla breve 2:35
7. Sonata in C, BWV 1037 Anh.III 187 - 4. Presto 4:56

G.F. Handel: Trio Sonata for 2 Flutes and Continuo in G minor, Op.2, No.6, HWV 391
8. Trio Sonata for 2 Flutes and Continuo in G minor, Op.2, No.6, HWV 391 - 1. Andante - Allegro 5:12
9. Trio Sonata for 2 Flutes and Continuo in G minor, Op.2, No.6, HWV 391 - 2. Arioso 3:36
10. Trio Sonata for 2 Flutes and Continuo in G minor, Op.2, No.6, HWV 391 - 3. Allegro 2:01

J. G. Benda: Trio Sonata for 2 Flutes and Continuo in G minor, Op.2, No.6, HWV 391
11. Trio Sonata in E major for 2 violins and piano - 1. Moderato 6:37
12. Trio Sonata in E major for 2 violins and piano - 2. Largo 5:27
13. Trio Sonata in E major for 2 violins and piano - 3. Allegro 2:42

H. Wieniawski: Etudes-Caprices for 2 violins, Op.18
14. Etudes-Caprices for 2 violins, Op.18 - No.2 in E flat major 5:14	play
15. Etudes-Caprices for 2 violins, Op.18 - No.5 in E major 1:55
16. Etudes-Caprices for 2 violins, Op.18 - No.4 in A minor 1:31

P. de Sarasate:
17. Navarra for two violins, Op.33

David Oistrakh (Conductor, Violin),
Igor Oistrakh (Violin)
Franz Konwitschny (Conductor),
Gewandhaus Orchestra
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra

 

"I was three and a half when my father brought home a toy violin," said the great Russian fiddler David Oistrakh. "I enthusiastically imagined myself a street player, a sad profession quite common at that time in Odessa." But he went on, he said, to become a child prodigy, "boring and without a spark." His own son Igor's violin training took a more conventional path, but to hear father and son together on this CD is to get a whiff of that original, wonderfully liberated Odessan sound. Liberated, but also remarkably disciplined: the tempi are often followed with metronomic precision, and there's no trace of virtuosic affectation. Their Bach is grave, their Vivaldi glowing, and their Handel full of vivid warmth. When they do let rip in the final Sarasate number, it's to dazzling effect. Recorded in the late 1950s, this is a disc to treasure and marvel at: their violins speak as one, in perfect symbiosis of mood and purpose. --Michael Church

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) David & Igor Oistrakh Sun, 12 Jun 2011 08:54:07 +0000
Hindemith - Violin Concerto Bruch - Scottish Fantasia (Oistrakh) [2006] http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/klasyczna/2585-david-a-igor-oistrakh/10719-hindemith-violin-concerto-bruch-scottish-fantasia-oistrakh.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/klasyczna/2585-david-a-igor-oistrakh/10719-hindemith-violin-concerto-bruch-scottish-fantasia-oistrakh.html Hindemith - Violin Concerto Bruch - Scottish Fantasia (Oistrakh) [2006]

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1. Scottish Fantasy, for violin & orchestra, Op. 46: Introduction. Grave. Adagio cantabile    
2. Scottish Fantasy, for violin & orchestra, Op. 46: Allegro. Andante sostenuto    
3. Scottish Fantasy, for violin & orchestra, Op. 46: Finale. Allegro Guerriero    
4. Violin Concerto, for violin & orchestra: Massig Bewegte Halbe    
5. Violin Concerto, for violin & orchestra: Langsam    
6. Violin Concerto, for violin & orchestra: Lebhaft

David Oistrakh – violin
London Symphony Orchestra
Jascha Horenstein – conductor

 

Max Bruch’s Scottish Fantasia is a late-Romantic work which is seldom found on concert hall programmes today. One realises after listening to the piece for the first time that the composition proves to be at least as solid and artistic as all the other works of the composer.

The London Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Jascha Horenstein gives a sonorous interpretation of the melancholic which, according to Bruch, depicted an aged minstrel who, while gazing upon the ruins of an ancient keep, ponders over the splendid days gone by. The well-known slender but warm timbre of David Oistrakh’s violin is well suited to this music which was inspired by Scotland.

David Oistrakh demonstrates his versatility in this performance of Hindemith’s Violin Concerto, written in 1939, where he effortlessly mesmerises the audience with breakneck cascades of scales. With many years of experience in the performance of modern music, the London Symphony Orchestra, led by the composer himself, prove that they are a match for this work.

This 1962 Decca recording engineered by Arthur Lilly and Alan Reeve at Walthamstow Town Hall in London offers first class interpretations of two great masterpieces from differing eras that have been acclaimed widely and have reached far beyond the circle of Oistrakh fans. Our Highest Recommnedation! --- musicdirect.com

 

Oistrakh fans no doubt will own this legendary recording of the Hindemith Violin Concerto, which is making its third appearance on CD, this time paired with its original LP partner, Bruch's Scottish Fantasy. Along with the Stern/Bernstein recording on Sony, Oistrakh's version (playing under the composer's baton) is one of the classic accounts of this inventive work and it is good to see it again, even though it's also currently available in Decca's Australian Eloquence series. Sound quality has not improved much beyond these other versions (despite the 96/24 digital transfer), except for the intrusion of slightly more tape hiss.

This two-disc set also includes the Oistrakhs (father and son Igor) in their rousing 1963 version of Mozart's Sinfonia concertante under Kirill Kondrashin and the Moscow Philharmonic. As on their later, slightly faster 1972 recording with the Berlin Philharmonic (on EMI), Oistrakh senior plays the viola part with amazing dexterity--but as a whole, the EMI version remains the favorite (and probably the best-ever recording of the work), thanks to the consummate orchestral accompaniment from the Berlin forces. By contrast, their Russian counterparts sound rough-edged and earthy. Mozart's charming Duo for Violin and Viola in G major (also on the original LP with the Sinfonia) graces this generous (if incongruous) compilation that no Oistrakh devotee will want to be without. ---Michael Leibowitz, ClassicsToday.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) David & Igor Oistrakh Thu, 03 Nov 2011 19:28:45 +0000