Rock, Metal The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/2685.html Tue, 04 Aug 2020 21:04:59 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb The White Stripes - De Stijl (2000) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/2685-white-stripes/16384-the-white-stripes-de-stijl-2000.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/2685-white-stripes/16384-the-white-stripes-de-stijl-2000.html The White Stripes - De Stijl (2000)

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1. You're Pretty Good Looking [For A Girl]	1:51	 
2. Hello Operator	2:38	
3. Little Bird	3:08
4. Apple Blossom	2:15
5. I'm Bound To Pack It Up	3:11	
6. Death Letter	4:32	
7. Sister, Do You Know My Name?	2:53	
8. Truth Doesn't Make A Noise	3:16	
9. A Boy's Best Friend	4:24
10. Let's Build A Home	2:00	
11. Jumble, Jumble	1:55	
12. Why Can't You Be Nicer To Me?	3:24	
13. Your Southern Can Is Mine	2:29

    Jack White – guitar, piano, lead vocals, double bass
    Meg White – drums, tambourine, backing vocals, shaker & floortom 
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    John Szymanski – harmonica 
    Paul Henry Ossy – violin

 

Despite their reputation as garage rock revivalists, the White Stripes display an impressive range of styles on their second album, De Stijl, which is Dutch for "the style." Perhaps the album's diversity -- which incorporates elements of bubblegum, cabaret, blues, and classic rock -- shouldn't come as a surprise from a band that dedicates its album to bluesman Blind Willie McTell and Dutch artist Gerrit Rietveld. Nevertheless, it's refreshing to hear the band go from the Tommy James-style pop of "You're Pretty Good Looking" to the garagey stomp of "Hello Operator" in a one-two punch. It's even more impressive that the theatrical, piano-driven ballad "Apple Blossom" and a cover of Son House's "Death Letter" go so well together on the same album. Jack White's understated production work and versatile guitar playing and vocals also stand out on the languid, fuzzy "Sister, Do You Know My Name?" as well as insistent rockers like "Little Bird" and "Why Can't You Be Nicer to Me?" As distinctive as it is diverse, De Stijl blends the Stripes' arty leanings with enough rock muscle to back up the band's ambitions. ---Heather Phares, allmusic.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) White Stripes Tue, 12 Aug 2014 13:32:34 +0000
The White Stripes - Under Moorhead Lights All Fargo Night (2011) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/2685-white-stripes/9744-the-white-stripes-under-moorhead-lights-all-fargo-night-2011.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/2685-white-stripes/9744-the-white-stripes-under-moorhead-lights-all-fargo-night-2011.html The White Stripes - Under Moorhead Lights All Fargo Night (2011)

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01 – Intro
02 – Let’s Shake Hands
03 – Screwdriver
04 – Wasting My Time		play
05 – Jolene
06 – Death Letter
07 – Little Bird
08 – Apple Blossom			play
09 – You’re Pretty Good Looking
10 – Your Southern Can Is Mine
11 – Sugar Never Tasted So Good
12 – Truth Doesn’t Make A Noise
13 – I’m Bored
14 – Cannon/John The Revelator

Jack White – vocals, guitar
Meg White – drums

 

The White Stripes began as part of a late-Nineties garage-rock revival, but the duo's music and concept — a once-married couple who pretended to be siblings and wore alternating red-and-white outfits – was always bigger than the lo-fi rock & roll of a typical garage band. Jack and Meg White created such a buzz on the underground music scene of the early-2000s that their third album, White Blood Cells, managed to climb to Number 61 on the Billboard 200, quite a feat for a raw and abrasive experimental rock band with no bassist and no second guitarist. By 2007, three White Stripes albums had reached the Top Ten and the duo had won several Grammys.

The White Stripes played their first show in July 1997, about nine months after bartender Meg White and upholsterer John Anthony Gillis married and began making music together. Gillis took his wife's last name and a dynamic duo was born. The marriage didn't last but the music did, and the White Stripes — Jack on vocals and guitars and Meg on drums — wound up signing with the indie-rock label Sympathy for the Record Industry, known for its roster of punk and garage rock. The duo's first two albums — The White Stripes and De Stijl — were home-recorded collections of gritty rock, acoustic folk and raw blues, and included a mix of originals along with covers of Bob Dylan, Robert Johnson, Son House and Blind Willie McTell. By the time of their third album, 2001's White Blood Cells, the White Stripes had made a name for themselves with their wacky mythology, striking red and white color scheme and Jack White's accomplished songwriting and guitar playing. When the larger V2 Records label signed the duo and re-released White Blood Cells the following year, the Stripes scored a minor hit with "Fell in Love with a Girl" (Number12, Modern Rock, 2002). By 2002, the White Stripes, along with New York City's The Strokes, were being hailed for bringing a new raw simplicity back to rock & roll.

After the release of Elephant in 2003, the White Stripes seemed to be everywhere — on magazine covers, celebrity news items and year-end best-of lists. The album reached Number Six on the Billboard 200, producing the Modern Rock hits "Seven Nation Army" (Number One Modern Rock, 2003) and "The Hardest Button to Button" (Number Eight Modern Rock, 2003). Meanwhile, Jack White hit the gossip columns due to his brief relationship with actress Renée Zellweger; the White Stripes had to cancel some 2003 tour dates after he and Zellweger were involved in a car accident. In December, White was back in the news, this time charged with assault after a confrontation with Jason Stollsteimer, singer of the garage band Von Bondies, at a Detroit club. He pleaded guilty and was fined $750 and remanded to anger management classes. In August, ROLLING STONE's list of the 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time that year ranked Jack White at a controversial #17, higher than such renowned guitarists as Pete Townshend, Frank Zappa, Eddie Van Halen and even bluesman Lightnin' Hopkins. Elephant wound up taking two awards – Best Alternative Music Album and Best Rock Song for "Seven Nation Army" — at the 2004 Grammys.

White, in 2004, produced country legend Loretta Lynn's 2004 album Van Lear Rose (Number Two, Country) after the White Stripes had covered her 1972 Number one hit "Rated X" for an early b-side.

The following year, the White Stripes expanded their sound on Get Behind Me Satan (Number Three pop, 2005), with heavy use of instruments like piano and marimbas, and a bigger, more metal-like guitar sound on tracks like "Blue Orchid" (Number Seven Modern Rock, 2005). But the basic, stripped-down sound remained the same, even if Jack White's voice was sounding curiously like that of Led Zeppelin singer Robert Plant. The duo nabbed another Best Alternative Music Album at the 2006 Grammy Awards. Meanwhile, White and his new wife, model and singer Karen Elson, moved to Nashville and the guitarist formed a new band, the Raconteurs. But rumors of the White Stripes' demise were quelled when he and Meg moved to Warner Bros. Records and returned to the studio for 2007's Icky Thump (Number Two, 2007). That album continued the expanded sound of Get Behind Me Satan, featuring bagpipes, horns and some prog-rock-like song structures. The first single, "Icky Thump" (Number One Modern rock, Number 26 Pop, 2007), which featured White's most political lyrics ever, criticized white American intolerance of Spanish-speaking immigrants. In September 2007, the duo canceled its tour, citing Meg White's "acute anxiety." The following year, the White Stripes were nominated for four more Grammys including Best Alternative Music Album and Best Rock Song for "Icky Thump." Jack White also has appeared in several films including a small part in 2003's Cold Mountain, Jim Jarmusch's Coffee and Cigarettes (with Meg) the same year, and the role of Elvis Presley in 2007's Walk Hard. --- whitestripes.net

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) White Stripes Sat, 16 Jul 2011 19:02:03 +0000
The White Stripes – Elephant (2003) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/2685-white-stripes/12465-the-white-stripes-elephant-2003.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/2685-white-stripes/12465-the-white-stripes-elephant-2003.html The White Stripes – Elephant (2003)

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1.Seven Nation Army
2.Black Math
3.There's No Home For You Here
4.I Just Don't Know What To Do With Myself
5.In The Cold, Cold Night		play
6.I Want To Be The Boy...
7.You've Got Her In Your Pocket
8.Ball And Biscuit
9.The Hardest Button To Button		play
10.Little Acorns
11.Hypnotise
12.The Air Near My Fingers
13.Girl, You Have No Faith In Medicine
14.It's True That We Love One Another

The White Stripes
    Jack White – vocals, guitar, piano, production, mixing
    Meg White – drums, vocals
+
    Mort Crim – speech on "Little Acorns"
    Holly Golightly – vocals on "It's True That We Love One Another"

 

White Blood Cells may have been a reaction to the amount of fame the White Stripes had received up to the point of its release, but, paradoxically, it made full-fledged rock stars out of Jack and Meg White and sold over half a million copies in the process. Despite the White Stripes' ambivalence, fame nevertheless seems to suit them: They just become more accomplished as the attention paid to them increases. Elephant captures this contradiction within the Stripes and their music; it's the first album they've recorded for a major label, and it sounds even more pissed-off, paranoid, and stunning than its predecessor. Darker and more difficult than White Blood Cells, the album offers nothing as immediately crowd-pleasing or sweet as "Fell in Love With a Girl" or "We're Going to Be Friends," but it's more consistent, exploring disillusionment and rejection with razor-sharp focus. Chip-on-the-shoulder anthems like the breathtaking opener, "Seven Nation Army," which is driven by Meg White's explosively minimal drumming, and "The Hardest Button to Button," in which Jack White snarls "Now we're a family!" -- one of the best oblique threats since Black Francis sneered "It's educational!" all those years ago -- deliver some of the fiercest blues-punk of the White Stripes' career. "There's No Home for You Here" sets a girl's walking papers to a melody reminiscent of "Dead Leaves and the Dirty Ground" (though the result is more sequel than rehash), driving the point home with a wall of layered, Queen-ly harmonies and piercing guitars, while the inspired version of "I Just Don't Know What to Do With Myself" goes from plaintive to angry in just over a minute, though the charging guitars at the end sound perversely triumphant. At its bruised heart, Elephant portrays love as a power struggle, with chivalry and innocence usually losing out to the power of seduction. "I Want to Be the Boy" tries, unsuccessfully, to charm a girl's mother; "You've Got Her in Your Pocket," a deceptively gentle ballad, reveals the darker side of the Stripes' vulnerability, blurring the line between caring for someone and owning them with some fittingly fluid songwriting.

The battle for control reaches a fever pitch on the "Fell in Love With a Girl"-esque "Hypnotize," which suggests some slightly underhanded ways of winning a girl over before settling for just holding her hand, and on the show-stopping "Ball and Biscuit," seven flat-out seductive minutes of preening, boasting, and amazing guitar prowess that ranks as one the band's most traditionally bluesy (not to mention sexy) songs. Interestingly, Meg's star turn, "In the Cold, Cold Night," is the closest Elephant comes to a truce in this struggle, her kitten-ish voice balancing the song's slinky words and music. While the album is often dark, it's never despairing; moments of wry humor pop up throughout, particularly toward the end. "Little Acorns" begins with a sound clip of Detroit newscaster Mort Crim's Second Thoughts radio show, adding an authentic, if unusual, Motor City feel. It also suggests that Jack White is one of the few vocalists who could make a lyric like "Be like the squirrel" sound cool and even inspiring. Likewise, the showy "Girl, You Have No Faith in Medicine" -- on which White resembles a garage rock snake-oil salesman -- is probably the only song featuring the word "acetaminophen" in its chorus. "It's True That We Love One Another," which features vocals from Holly Golightly as well as Meg White, continues the Stripes' tradition of closing their albums on a lighthearted note. Almost as much fun to analyze as it is to listen to, Elephant overflows with quality -- it's full of tight songwriting, sharp, witty lyrics, and judiciously used basses and tumbling keyboard melodies that enhance the band's powerful simplicity (and the excellent "The Air Near My Fingers" features all of these). Crucially, the White Stripes know the difference between fame and success; while they may not be entirely comfortable with their fame, they've succeeded at mixing blues, punk, and garage rock in an electrifying and unique way ever since they were strictly a Detroit phenomenon. On these terms, Elephant is a phenomenal success. ---Heather Phares, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) White Stripes Sun, 08 Jul 2012 15:56:45 +0000
The White Stripes – Nine Miles From The White City [Live Album] (2013) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/2685-white-stripes/14416-the-white-stripes-nine-miles-from-the-white-city-live-album-2013.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/2685-white-stripes/14416-the-white-stripes-nine-miles-from-the-white-city-live-album-2013.html The White Stripes – Nine Miles From The White City [Live Album] (2013)

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01 – When I Hear My Name
02 – Dead Leaves And The Dirty Ground
03 – Love Sick
04 – Hotel Yora
05 – Aluminum
06 – Cool Drink Of Water Blues
07 – The Hardest Button To Button
08 – I Want To Be The Boy Who Warms Your Mother’s Heart
09 – Stones In My Passway
10 – Stop Breaking Down
11 – Do
12 – In The Cold, Cold Night
13 – Seven Nation 0rmy
14 – The Same Boy You’ve Always Known
15 – Black Jack Davey
16 – We Are Going To Be Friends
17 – Little Cream Soda
18 – Offend In Every Way
19 – Cannon_Party of Special Things To Do
20 – Candy Cane Children
21 – The Air Near My Fingers
22 – This Protector
23 – Screwdriver (Tease)
24 – Ball And Biscuit
25 – Screwdriver (Reprise)
26 – Let’s Build A Home
27 – Goin’ Back To Memphis

 

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of the White Stripes’ Elephant, the Third Man Records’ “Vault” subscription series is releasing Nine Miles From the White City– a live album recorded at Chicago’s Aragon Ballroom in 2003. It’s a double LP featuring 26 songs. That’s a taste of “The Hardest Button to Button” from White City up there. The Vault package also includes a 7″ featuring demos of the Elephant tracks “I Want to Be the Boy to Warm Your Mother’s Heart” (check out the snippet below) and “Little Acorns”. And as if that wasn’t enough, they’re also throwing in a photo book documenting the Elephant recording sessions; it features photos by David Swanson. Naturally, these things will be packaged beautifully: One LP of the live album will be on red vinyl; the other one will be pressed on white vinyl. The 7″ will be pressed on “opaque red vinyl with black whisps.” --- hasitleaked.com

 

Specjalny, koncertowy album jest dostępny tylko dla wiernych fanów, którzy zapiszą się do klubu wytwórni Jacka White`a. To właśnie ta firma wydaje płytę. "Nine Miles From the White City" ma zawierać 26 piosenek.

Koncert nagrano w 2003 w Aragon Ballroom w Chicago. Album będzie dostępny na winylu. Okazją do wydania "Nine Miles From the White City" jest 10- lecie premiery płyty The White Stripes "Elephant". Przypomnijmy, że duet tworzony przez Meg i Jacka White`ów oficjalnie zakończył działalność w 2011 roku. --- eskarock.pl

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) White Stripes Fri, 12 Jul 2013 14:33:41 +0000