Pop & Miscellaneous The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/pop-miscellaneous/217.html Sun, 27 Nov 2022 11:12:00 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Otis Redding - Dreams to Remember The Otis Redding Anthology (1998) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/pop-miscellaneous/217-otisreding/7723-otis-redding-dreams-to-remember-1998.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/pop-miscellaneous/217-otisreding/7723-otis-redding-dreams-to-remember-1998.html Otis Redding - Dreams to Remember The Otis Redding Anthology (1998)

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01 I've Got Dreams to Remember
02 (Sittin' on) the Dock of the Bay
03 Try a Little Tenderness
04 Change is Gonna Come
05 I've Been Loving you Too Long (to Stop Now)
06 These Arms of Mine
07 Respect
08 Hard to Handle
09 Fa-Fa-Fa-Fa-Fa (Sad Song) play
10 Satisfaction
11 That's How Strong my Love is
12 I Can't Turn you Loose
13 Love Man
14 My Girl
15 Shake
16 My Lover's Prayer
17 Security
18 Mr. Pitiful
19 Tramp
20 Cigarettes & Coffee
21 Pain in my Heart
22 Cupid
23 Chain Gang
24 Knock on Wood
25 I Love you More Than Words Can Say
26 the Happy Son (Dum- Dum)
27 Wonderful Word play

Personnel
* Otis Redding - vocals, guitar
* Carla Thomas - vocals
* Booker T. Jones - guitar, piano, electronic organ
* Steve Cropper - guitar, piano, bass
* Johnny Jenkins - guitar
* Charles "Packy" Axton
* Andrew Love
* Joe Arnold
* Gilbert Caples
* Gene Parker
* Tommie Lee Williams - tenor saxophone
* Floyd Newman - baritone saxophone
* Wayne Jackson
* Sammie Coleman
* Gene "Bowlegs" Miller
* Ben Cauley - trumpet
* Isaac Hayes - piano, organ
* Lewis Steinberg - bass
* Donald "Duck" Dunn - bass
* Wayne Cochran - bass
* Al Jackson, Jr. - drums
* Rick Hall - drums
* Phil Walden - tambourine
* William Bell
* David Porter - background vocals
* The Pinetoppers

 

Dreams to Remember: The Otis Redding Anthology presents an interesting dilemma. Certainly, the music is superb. The question is, was the collection necessary? Casual listeners who just want the hits will be satisfied with the excellent The Very Best of Otis Redding, Vol. 1, while those who want to dig deeper will find the four-disc box Otis! The Definitive Otis Redding essential, or will opt for the actual albums. Dreams to Remember falls somewhere between the two extremes, containing too much music for the casual listener and not being extensive enough for serious listeners. Perhaps realizing this, Rhino added several tracks here that weren't featured on the box set, but any true collector will have these songs on the original albums. So, Dreams to Remember is in limbo -- a fine collection that isn't really necessary. It's not a bad choice, to be sure, but The Very Best of Otis Redding, Vol. 1 and Otis! are better choices, depending on your tastes. ---Stephen Thomas Erlewine, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Otis Redding Mon, 20 Dec 2010 10:10:21 +0000
Otis Redding - Live In Europe (1967) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/pop-miscellaneous/217-otisreding/7736-otis-redding-live-in-europe-1967.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/pop-miscellaneous/217-otisreding/7736-otis-redding-live-in-europe-1967.html Otis Redding - Live In Europe (1967)

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1. Respect play
2. Can't Turn You Loose
3. I've Been Loving You Too Long
4. My Girl
5. Shake
6. Satisfaction
7. Fa-Fa-Fa-Fa-Fa (Sad Song)
8. These Arms of Mine
9. Day Tripper play
10. Try A Little Tenderness

Personnel:
Otis Redding (vocals);
Steve Cropper (guitar);
Andrew Love, Joe Arnold (tenor saxophone);
Wayne Jackson (trumpet);
Booker T. Jones (organ);
Donald "Duck" Dunn (bass);
Al Jackson, Jr. (drums).

 

Live in Europe is a live album from soul singer Otis Redding. It was Redding's first live album and the final album released before his death December 1967. The album was recorded during the Stax/Volt tour of Europe and Redding is backed by Booker T. & the MG's. Recorded at the Olympia Theatre, Paris; March 21, 1967. The album is currently available on CD, digitally remastered by Bill Inglot and Dan Hersch as part of the Atlantic & Atco Remasters Series. In 2003, the album was ranked number 474 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Otis Redding Wed, 22 Dec 2010 10:11:30 +0000
Otis Redding - Otis Blue: Otis Redding Sings Soul (1965) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/pop-miscellaneous/217-otisreding/7713-otis-redding-otis-blue-1965.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/pop-miscellaneous/217-otisreding/7713-otis-redding-otis-blue-1965.html Otis Redding - Otis Blue: Otis Redding Sings Soul (1965)

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01. Ole Man Trouble (Otis Redding) 2:36
02. Respect (Otis Redding) 2:05
03. Change Is Gonna Come (Sam Cooke) 4:17 play
04. Down in the Valley (Solomon Burke) 3:02
05. I've Been Loving You Too Long (Redding & Butler) 3:10
06. Shake (Sam Cooke) 2:39
07. My Girl (William Robinson & Ronald White) 2:52
08. Wonderful World (Barbara Campbell) 3:06
09. Rock Me Baby (B. King & Joe Josea) 3:28 play
10. (I Can't Get No) Satisfaction (Mick Jagger & Keith Richard) 2:45
11. You Don't Miss Your Water (William Bell) 2:46

Musicians:
Wayne Jackson and Gene Miller (tp)
Andrew Love (ts)
Floyd Newman (bs)
Isaac Hayes and Booker T. Jones (p, org)
Steve Cropper (g)
Donald "Duck" Dunn (b)
Al Jackson (ds)
Otis Redding and Earl Sims (vo)

 

Otis Redding's third album, and his first fully realized album, presents his talent unfettered, his direction clear, and his confidence emboldened, with fully half the songs representing a reach that extended his musical grasp. More than a quarter of this album is given over to Redding's versions of songs by Sam Cooke, his idol, who had died the previous December, and all three are worth owning and hearing. Two of them, "A Change Is Gonna Come" and "Shake," are every bit as essential as any soul recordings ever made, and while they (and much of this album) have reappeared on several anthologies, it's useful to hear the songs from those sessions juxtaposed with each other, and with "Wonderful World," which is seldom compiled elsewhere. Also featured are Redding's spellbinding renditions of "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction" (a song epitomizing the fully formed Stax/Volt sound and which Mick Jagger and Keith Richards originally wrote in tribute to and imitation of Redding's style), "My Girl," and "You Don't Miss Your Water." "Respect" and "I've Been Loving You Too Long," two originals that were to loom large in his career, are here as well; the former became vastly popular in the hands of Aretha Franklin and the latter was an instant soul classic. Among the seldom-cited jewels here is a rendition of B.B. King's "Rock Me Baby" that has the singer sharing the spotlight with Steve Cropper, his playing alternately elegant and fiery, with Wayne Jackson and Gene "Bowlegs" Miller's trumpets and Andrew Love's and Floyd Newman's saxes providing the backing. Redding's powerful, remarkable singing throughout makes Otis Blue gritty, rich, and achingly alive, and an essential listening experience. --- Bruce Eder, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Otis Redding Sun, 19 Dec 2010 10:52:26 +0000
Otis Redding - The Dock Of The Bay (1968) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/pop-miscellaneous/217-otisreding/7760-otis-redding-the-dock-of-the-bay-1992.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/pop-miscellaneous/217-otisreding/7760-otis-redding-the-dock-of-the-bay-1992.html Otis Redding - The Dock Of The Bay (1968)

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1 	Sittin On The Dock Of The Bay 	2:38
2 	I Love You More Than Words Can Say 	2:50
3 	Let Me Come On Home 	2:53
4 	Open The Door 	2:21
5 	Don't Mess With Cupid 	2:28
6 	The Glory Of Love 	2:38
7 	I M Coming Home 	3:03
8 	Tramp 	2:58
9 	The Huckle Buck 	2:58
10 	Nobody Knows You 	3:10
11 	Ole Man Trouble 	2:36

Personnel:
Otis Redding, Carla Thomas (vocals);
Steve Cropper (guitar);
Andrew Love, Joe Arnold, Charles "Packy" Axton (tenor saxophone);
Floyd Newman (baritone saxophone);
Wayne Jackson, Sammy Coleman, Gene "Bowlegs" Miller (trumpet);
Booker T. Jones, Isaac Hayes (keyboards);
Donald "Duck" Dunn (bass);
Al Jackson, Jr. (drums).

 

It was never supposed to be like this: "(Sittin' On) The Dock of the Bay" was supposed to mark the beginning of a new phase in Otis Redding's career, not an ending. Producer/guitarist Steve Cropper had a difficult task to perform in pulling together this album, the first of several posthumous releases issued by Stax/Volt in the wake of Redding's death. What could have been a cash-in effort or a grim memorial album instead became a vivid, exciting presentation of some key aspects of the talent that was lost when Redding died. Dock of the Bay is, indeed, a mixed bag of singles and B-sides going back to July of 1965, one hit duet with Carla Thomas, and two, previously unissued tracks from 1966 and 1967. There's little cohesion, stylistic or otherwise, in the songs, especially when the title track is taken into consideration -- nothing else here resembles it, for the obvious reason that Redding never had a chance to follow it up. Despite the mix-and-match nature of the album, however, this is an impossible record not to love. Cropper chose his tracks well, selecting some of the strongest and most unusual among the late singer's orphaned songs: "I Love You More Than Words Can Say" is one of Redding's most passionate performances; "Let Me Come on Home" presents an ebullient Redding accompanied by some sharp playing, and "Don't Mess with Cupid" begins with a gorgeous guitar flourish and blooms into an intense, pounding, soaring showcase for singer and band alike. No one could complain about the album then, and it still holds more than four decades later. ---Bruce Eder, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Otis Redding Sun, 26 Dec 2010 12:14:15 +0000
Otis Redding – Otis Redding Soul Legend (2011) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/pop-miscellaneous/217-otisreding/10597-otis-redding-otis-redding-soul-legend-2011.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/pop-miscellaneous/217-otisreding/10597-otis-redding-otis-redding-soul-legend-2011.html Otis Redding – Otis Redding Soul Legend (2011)

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CD1
01 – Sittin’ On – The Dock Of The Bay
02 – Hard To Handle
03 – The Happy Song [Dum-Dum]
04 – Fa-Fa-Fa-Fa-Fa (Sad Song)						play
05 – Tramp – [Duet With Carla Thomas]
06 – Knock On Wood – [Duet With Carla Thomas]
07 – Day Tripper
08 – Try A Little Tenderness
09 – My Lover’s Prayer
10 – Let Me Come On Home
11 – Pain In My Heart								play
12 – These Arms Of Mine
13 – That’s How Strong My Love Is
14 – I’ve Been Loving You Too Long
15 – Just One More Day
16 – Security
17 – Chained and Bound
18 – Ole Man Trouble [Album Cut - Otis Blue]
19 – Cigarettes and Coffee [Album Cut - The Soul Album]
20 – She Put The Hurt On Me

CD2:
01 – Shake [Live]
02 – My Girl
03 – I Can’t Turn You Loose
04 – Mr Pitiful
05 – Respect										play
06 – (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction
07 – Glory Of Love
08 – I Love You More Than Words Can Say
09 – I’ve Got Dreams To Remember
10 – Open The Door
11 – I’m Coming Home To See About You
12 – Nobody’s Fault But Mine
13 – Champagne And Wine
14 – A Lover’s Question
15 – Love Man										play
16 – Free Me
17 – Direct Me
18 – Amen

 

One of the most influential soul singers of the 1960s, Otis Redding exemplified to many listeners the power of Southern "deep soul" -- hoarse, gritty vocals, brassy arrangements, and an emotional way with both party tunes and aching ballads. He was also the most consistent exponent of the Stax sound, cutting his records at the Memphis label/studios that did much to update R&B into modern soul. His death at the age of 26 was tragic not just because he seemed on the verge of breaking through to a wide pop audience (which he would indeed do with his posthumous number one single "[Sittin' On] The Dock of the Bay"). It was also unfortunate because, as "Dock of the Bay" demonstrated, he was also at a point of artistic breakthrough in terms of the expression and sophistication of his songwriting and singing.

Although Redding at his peak was viewed as a consummate, versatile showman, he began his recording career in the early '60s as a Little Richard-styled shouter. The Georgian was working in the band of guitarist Johnny Jenkins at the time, and in 1962 he took advantage of an opportunity to record the ballad "These Arms of Mine" at a Jenkins session. When it became an R&B hit, Redding's solo career was truly on its way, though the hits didn't really start to fly until 1965 and 1966, when "Mr. Pitiful," "I've Been Loving You Too Long," "I Can't Turn You Loose," a cover of the Rolling Stones' "Satisfaction," and "Respect" (later turned into a huge pop smash by Aretha Franklin) were all big sellers.

Redding wrote much of his own material, sometimes with the assistance of Booker T. & the MG's guitarist Steve Cropper. Yet at the time, Redding's success was primarily confined to the soul market; his singles charted only mildly on the pop listings. He was nonetheless tremendously respected by many white groups, particularly the Rolling Stones, who covered Redding's "That's How Strong My Love Is" and "Pain in My Heart." (Redding also returned the favor with "Satisfaction.")

One of Redding's biggest hits was a duet with fellow Stax star Carla Thomas, "Tramp," in 1967. That was the same year he began to show signs of making major inroads into the white audience, particularly with a well-received performance at the Monterey Pop Festival (also issued on record). Redding's biggest triumph, however, came just days before his death, when he recorded the wistful "(Sittin' On) The Dock of the Bay," which represented a significant leap as far as examination of more intensely personal emotions. Also highlighted by crisp Cropper guitar leads and dignified horns, it rose to the top of the pop charts in early 1968.

Redding, however, had perished in a plane crash in Wisconsin on December 10, 1967, in an accident that also took the lives of four members from his backup band, the Bar-Kays. A few other singles became posthumous hits, and a good amount of other unreleased material was issued in the wake of his death. These releases weren't purely exploitative in nature, in fact containing some pretty interesting music, and little that could be considered embarrassing. What Redding might have achieved, or what directions he might have explored, are among the countless tantalizing "what if" questions in rock & roll history. As it is, he did record a considerable wealth of music at Stax, which is now available on thoughtfully archived reissues. ---Richie Unterberger, Rovi

 

Otis Redding (ur. 9 września 1941, zm. 10 grudnia 1967) - afroamerykański piosenkarz tworzący muzykę w gatunku soul w stylach deep soul i southern soul. Był jednym z najwybitniejszych twórców muzyki tego gatunku. Surowo brzmiący śpiew, uczuciowe wykonanie oraz rozbudowane aranżacje oparte na instrumentach blaszanych to podstawowe cechy piosenek Reddinga. Artysta ma na swoim koncie głębokie, melancholijne ballady jak i taneczne przeboje.

Otis Redding zginął w katastrofie lotniczej w Wisconsin wraz z członkami swego zespołu instrumentalnego The Bar-Kays. W 1989 Otis Redding został wprowadzony do Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. ---last.fm

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Otis Redding Sat, 22 Oct 2011 18:17:49 +0000
Otis Redding – The Definitive Collection (The Dock of The Bay) [1987] http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/pop-miscellaneous/217-otisreding/406-redingdockbay.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/pop-miscellaneous/217-otisreding/406-redingdockbay.html Otis Redding – The Definitive Collection (The Dock of The Bay) [1987]


1.   Otis Redding - Respect
2.   Otis Redding - Mr. Pitiful
3.   Otis Redding - Love man
4.   Otis Redding - Satisfaction (i can't get no)
5.   Otis Redding - Security
6.   Otis Redding - I can't turn you loose
7.   Otis Redding - Shake
8.   Otis Redding - Hard to handle
9.   Otis Redding - Tramp
10.  Otis Redding - Fa-fa-fa-fa-fa (sad song)
11.  Otis Redding - My lover's prayer
12.  Otis Redding - These arms of mine
13.  Otis Redding - That's how strong my love is
14.  Otis Redding - Cigarettes and coffee
15.  Otis Redding - My girl
16.  Otis Redding - A change is gonna come
17.  Otis Redding - I've been loving you too long
18.  Otis Redding - Try a little tenderness
19.  Otis Redding - Pain in my heart
20.  Otis Redding - The dock of the bay (sittin'on)

 

One of the most influential soul singers of the 1960s, Otis Redding exemplified to many listeners the power of Southern "deep soul" -- hoarse, gritty vocals, brassy arrangements, and an emotional way with both party tunes and aching ballads. He was also the most consistent exponent of the Stax sound, cutting his records at the Memphis label/studios that did much to update R&B into modern soul. His death at the age of 26 was tragic not just because he seemed on the verge of breaking through to a wide pop audience (which he would indeed do with his posthumous number one single "[Sittin' On] The Dock of the Bay"). It was also unfortunate because, as "Dock of the Bay" demonstrated, he was also at a point of artistic breakthrough in terms of the expression and sophistication of his songwriting and singing.

Although Redding at his peak was viewed as a consummate, versatile showman, he began his recording career in the early '60s as a Little Richard-styled shouter. The Georgian was working in the band of guitarist Johnny Jenkins at the time, and in 1962 he took advantage of an opportunity to record the ballad "These Arms of Mine" at a Jenkins session. When it became an R&B hit, Redding's solo career was truly on its way, though the hits didn't really start to fly until 1965 and 1966, when "Mr. Pitiful," "I've Been Loving You Too Long," "I Can't Turn You Loose," a cover of the Rolling Stones' "Satisfaction," and "Respect" (later turned into a huge pop smash by Aretha Franklin) were all big sellers.

Redding wrote much of his own material, sometimes with the assistance of Booker T. & the MG's guitarist Steve Cropper. Yet at the time, Redding's success was primarily confined to the soul market; his singles charted only mildly on the pop listings. He was nonetheless tremendously respected by many white groups, particularly the Rolling Stones, who covered Redding's "That's How Strong My Love Is" and "Pain in My Heart." (Redding also returned the favor with "Satisfaction.".

One of Redding's biggest hits was a duet with fellow Stax star Carla Thomas, "Tramp," in 1967. That was the same year he began to show signs of making major inroads into the white audience, particularly with a well-received performance at the Monterey Pop Festival (also issued on record). Redding's biggest triumph, however, came just days before his death, when he recorded the wistful "(Sittin' On) The Dock of the Bay," which represented a significant leap as far as examination of more intensely personal emotions. Also highlighted by crisp Cropper guitar leads and dignified horns, it rose to the top of the pop charts in early 1968.

Redding, however, had perished in a plane crash in Wisconsin on December 10, 1967, in an accident that also took the lives of four members from his backup band, the Bar-Kays. A few other singles became posthumous hits, and a good amount of other unreleased material was issued in the wake of his death. These releases weren't purely exploitative in nature, in fact containing some pretty interesting music, and little that could be considered embarrassing. What Redding might have achieved, or what directions he might have explored, are among the countless tantalizing "what if" questions in rock & roll history. As it is, he did record a considerable wealth of music at Stax, which is now available on thoughtfully archived reissues. ---sputnikmusic.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Otis Redding Tue, 13 Oct 2009 20:07:27 +0000