Music Notes The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes.html Sun, 21 Jan 2018 00:31:23 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Alison Balsom - Antonio Vivaldi: Concerto in A Minor http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/3-classical/22861-john-lee-hooker-red-house.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/3-classical/22861-john-lee-hooker-red-house.html

Alison Balsom - Antonio Vivaldi: Concerto in A Minor

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Classical Notes Sat, 13 Jan 2018 12:47:41 +0000
The Thrill Is Gone (jazz standard) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/25-jazz/22845-the-thrill-is-gone-jazz-standard.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/25-jazz/22845-the-thrill-is-gone-jazz-standard.html The Thrill Is Gone (jazz standard)

Showman George White began as a dancer and actor but is best known for his ‘Scandals,’ annual musical revues (1919-1926) that were rivals to the ‘Ziegfeld Follies.’ Inspired by the Folies Bergère of Paris, the Ziegfeld Follies was a series of elaborate theatrical revue productions on Broadway in New York City from 1907 to 1931, with renewals in 1934 and 1936. George White's Scandals launched the careers of many entertainers, including W. C. Fields, the Three Stooges, Ray Bolger, Helen Morgan, Ethel Merman, Ann Miller, Bert Lahr and Rudy Vallée.

The Thrill Is Gone (jazz)

In 1925, White hired Ray Henderson to score Scandals. Henderson had by that time teamed with B. G. DeSylva and Lew Brown who contributed the lyrics. White used the team again in ’26, ’28, and ’31 although the latter was sans B. G. DeSylva who had moved on to motion picture production.

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George White

 

Born in Buffalo, NY, on December 1, 1896, Ray Henderson later studied at the Chicago Conservatory and performed in vaudeville and dance bands while he was there. He eventually worked as an arranger and song plugger for New York publishing houses, in addition to collaborating with many lyricists, including Lew Brown, starting in 1922. The duo's early hits included "Alabamy Bound," "Bye Bye Blackbird," and "I'm Sitting on Top of the World." In 1925, lyricist Buddy DeSylva joined them and the trio successfully established itself with a second Broadway score, George White's Scandals of 1926.

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Ray Henderson

 

Off the stage, the songwriting trio had several hit songs, in addition to movie credits for songs in early Al Jolson films (including “Sonny Boy” and “It All Depends on You”) and the popular 1929 film “Sunny Side Up,” which the trio went to Hollywood to work on. After DeSylva left in 1931, Brown and Henderson continued scoring Broadway shows, including “Hot-Cha” (1932) and “Strike Me Pink” (1933). Henderson's final stage show was The Ziegfeld Follies of 1943, after which he faded away from the public eye, re-emerging only once to conduct on TV around 1950. Ray Henderson died on New Year's Eve 1970.

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Chet Baker - Thrill is gone

 

Lew Brown was born Louis Brownstein in Odessa, Russia on December 10, 1893. His family brought him to America in 1898 at the age of five and he attended De Witt Clinton High School in the Bronx, New York. While still in his teens, he began writing parodies of popular songs of the day; and eventually began writing original lyrics. His first songwriting partner was Albert von Tilzer, an already established composer fifteen years his senior, and in 1912 they had a hit with "I'm The Lonesomest Gal In Town". In 1922, Brown met Ray Henderson, a pianist, and composer, and they quickly started writing songs together. Their first hit was "Georgette", introduced in the Greenwich Village Follies of 1922. In 1925, Brown and Henderson were joined by lyricist Buddy De Sylva, creating one of the most influential and popular songwriting and publishing teams in Tin Pan Alley.

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Lew Brown

 

Brown collaborated with other composers, including Con Conrad, Moe Jaffe, Sidney Clare, Harry Warren, Cliff Friend, Harry Akst, Jay Gorney, Louis Alter, and Harold Arlen. In 1937, with composer Sammy Fain, he wrote one of the enduring classics of the American popular song, "That Old Feeling". In 1956, Hollywood produced a biographical film about the legendary threesome of De Sylva, Brown and Henderson, entitled “The Best Things in Life Are Free.” Lew Brown died two years after the release on February 5, 1958, in New York City.

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DeSylva, Brown & Henderson

 

Rudy Vallee and His Connecticut Yankees introduced “The Thrill is Gone” on the Victor label. Along with its B side, “My Song,” the tune went on to the charts on September 12, 1931, rising to number ten. Also charting on that day was Vallee’s cover of “Life Is Just a Bowl of Cherries,” which rose to number three. All three of the above-mentioned songs were written for the Broadway revue, George White’s Scandals which opened at the Apollo Theatre on September 14, 1931 and ran for 202 performances.

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Rudy Vallée

 

Although the cast included Vallee, “The Thrill Is Gone” was performed by baritone Everett Marshall; “My Song” and “Life Is Just a Bowl of Cherries” were performed by Ethel Merman. Other hits included “This Is Missus,” introduced by Valee, and “That’s Why Darkies Were Born.”

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George White’s Scandals 1931

 

“The Thrill Is Gone” has the distinction of being included on a 1931 landmark recording. According to David Ewen in his book, ‘Great Men of American Popular Song,’ “Brunswick Records released a twelve-inch platter in which all the hit songs from this revue were recorded by Bing Crosby and the Boswell Sisters, marking the first attempt to reproduce the basic score of a single production in a recording.” The double-sided, 78-RPM record was titled Gems from George White’s Scandals, with music by Victor Young and the Brunswick Orchestra and vocals by the Boswell Sisters, Bing Crosby, Frank Munn and the Mills Brothers, and trombone passages by Thomas Dorsey.

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Archie Shepp Quartet play The Thrill Is Gone

 

“The Thrill Is Gone” has been recorded by Sarah Vaughan, Ella Fitzgerald, Stan Kenton, Chet Baker, Julie London, Ella Fitzgerald, Nina Simone and Stan Getz to name a few.

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Ray Bryant Trio - The Thrill Is Gone, single 1957

 

The Thrill Is Gone, lyrics


The thrill is gone,
The thrill is gone,
I can see it in your eyes,
I can hear it in your sighs,
Feel your touch and realise
The thrill is gone.

The nights are cold,
For love is old,
Love was grand when love was new,
Birds were singing, skies were blue,
Now it don't appeal to you,
The thrill is gone.

This is the end
So why pretend
And let it linger on?
The thrill is gone,
The thrill is gone.

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Roy Hawkins - The Thrill Is Gone, 1951

 

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Jazz Notes Tue, 09 Jan 2018 17:26:58 +0000
Rachmaninov - All-Night Vigil (Vespers) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/3-classical/22761-rachmaninov-all-night-vigil-vespers.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/3-classical/22761-rachmaninov-all-night-vigil-vespers.html Rachmaninov - All-Night Vigil (Vespers)

For being such utterly beautiful music, this piece doesn't seem to get a whole lot of attention. That's a shame, because you can't help but be captivated by it once you listen. Theses are the dangers of extolling a composer for a particular section of his work; this unfortunately tends to smother the hidden gems in his or her output. The Vespers aren't exactly hidden, but they aren't clogging the shelves either.

Rachmaninov - All-Night Vigil (Vespers)

Rachmaninov’s “All Night Vigil” (“Vsenoshchnoe bdenie”) is generally known in English-speaking countries as the “Vespers,” but this translation is “incorrect”. However the usage of the title “Vespers” is well-established, and is not likely to be superseded any more. “Vespers” is after all the title usually employed to describe evening services in both the Anglican and Catholic liturgies.

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Sergey Rachmaninov

 

Rachmaninoff composed the “All-Night Vigil” in less than two weeks in January and February 1915. ‘The All-Night Vigil’ is perhaps notable as one of two liturgical settings (the other being the ‘Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom’) by a composer who had stopped attending church services. As required by the Russian Orthodox Church, Rachmaninoff based ten of the fifteen sections on chant. However, the five original sections (numbers 1, 3, 6, 10, & 11) were so heavily influenced by chant that the composer called them "conscious counterfeits".

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All-Night Vigil - score

 

When celebrated at the All-night vigil, the orders of Great Vespers and Matins vary somewhat from when they are celebrated by themselves. In parish usage, many portions of the service such as the readings from the Synaxarion during the Canon at Matins are abbreviated or omitted, and it therefore takes approximately two or two and a half hours to perform. The Psalms are numbered according to the Septuagint, which differs from that found in the Masoretic.

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All-Night Vigil - Christmas Vigil

 

Rachmaninoff's work is a culmination of the preceding two decades of interest in Russian sacred music, as initiated by Tchaikovsky's setting of the all-night vigil. The similarities between the works, such as the extensive use of traditional chants, demonstrates the extent of Tchaikovsky's influence; however, Rachmaninoff's setting is much more complex in its use of harmony, textual variety and polyphony.

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Christmas Vigil

 

The first performance was given in Moscow on March 10, 1915, partly to benefit the Russian war effort. Nikolai Danilin conducted the all-male Moscow Synodal Choir at the premiere. It was received warmly by critics and audiences alike, and was so successful that it was performed five more times within a month. However the Russian Revolution of 1917 and the rise of the Soviet Union led to the government condemnation of religious music, and on 22 July 1918 the Synodal Choir was replaced by a non-religious "People's Choir Academy". It has been written that "no composition represents the end of an era so clearly as this liturgical work".

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Nicolai Danilin

 

The first recording of the Vigil was made by Alexander Sveshnikov with the State Academic Russian Choir of the USSR for the Soviet Melodiya label in 1965 - exactly half a century after the work's first performance. Because of Soviet anti-religious policies, this record was never available for sale within the USSR, but was only made for the export market and private study. This recording still has a legendary reputation, in part because of its extremely strong low basses, but also because of the solos by Klara Korkan and Konstantin Ognevoi.

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Alexander Sveshnikov

 

Anyone familiar with this repertoire, so intimately associated with Russian culture and religious tradition, who happened to be looking for an exemplary recording, might understandably assume that the ideal performance would be owned by a Russian church or concert choir; after all, these groups, theoretically at least, possess both the singular vocal quality and practiced technique, along with the inherent interpretive understanding, to set the standard for all others. The work first became known outside Russia from Melodiya recordings in the 1970s. For a long time the piece was regarded as the exclusive preserve of Soviet choirs, if only because the sometimes subterranean writing for the basses was considered to be beyond the capacity of non-Slavic voices.

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Rachmaninov - Vespers, 1965

 

Until the late 1980s non-Russian recordings were rare, while those made in Russia had to contend with official disapproval from the religion-leery Soviet state. Since then, both Russian and Western recordings have come fast and furious. Interpretations are as varied as for any major work of the 20th century, with everything from magnificently rumbling but tonally insecure Russian singers to precise but pale Western cathedral choirs taking on the work.

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Rachmaninov - Vespers, Hillier 2005

 

The Rachmaninov’s Vigil has been set to music most famously, whose setting of selections from the service is one of his most admired works. The “All-Night Vigil” has a myriad of different versions available, and your taste in vocal style will have everything to say about which kinds of performance you will prefer over the long term.

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Rachmaninov - Vespers, Polyanski 1986

 

Movements:
1    Приидите, поклонимся (Priidite, poklonimsya) / O Come, Let Us Worship (Venite adoremus)
2    Благослови, душе моя (Blagoslovi, dushe moya)/ Praise the Lord, O my soul (Benedic anima mea)
3    Блажен муж (Blazhen muzh) / Blessed is the Man (Beatus vir)
4    Свете тихий (Svete tikhiy) / Gladsome Light
5    Ныне отпущаеши (Nyne otpushchayeshi) / Nunc dimittis
6    Богородице Дево, радуйся (Bogorodishche Devo, raduysya) / Ave Maria
7    Шестопсалмие (Shestopsalmiye) / Glory be to God
8    Хвалите имя Господне (Khvalite imya Gospodne)/ Praise be the name of the Lord (Laudate Dominum)
9    Благословен еси, Господи (Blagosloven yesi, Gospodi) / Blessed be the Lord
10   Воскресение Христово видевше (Voskreseniye Khristovo videvshe)/ The Veneration of the Cross
11   Величит душа Моя Господа (Belichit dusha Moya Gospoda) / Magnificat
12   Славословие великое (Slavosloviye velikoye) / Gloria in Excelsis
13   Днесь спасение (Dnes' spaseniye) / The Day of Salvation
14   Воскрес из гроба (Voskres iz groba) / Christ is Risen
15   Взбранной воеводе (Vzbrannoy voyevode) / To the Mother of God 

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WDR Rundfunk Choir (Nikolas Fink) sing Rachmaninov's Vespers

 

 

Rachmaninov – All-Night Vigil (Phoenix Chorale-Kansas City Chorale, Charles Bruffy)

 

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Classical Notes Sat, 23 Dec 2017 21:52:19 +0000
Little Girl Blue http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/25-jazz/22653-little-girl-blue.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/25-jazz/22653-little-girl-blue.html Little Girl Blue

The Hippodrome was a gigantic theater which opened in New York in 1905 as a venue for larger than life productions. It was the flamboyant producer/impresario Billy Rose who conceived of a spectacle--part Broadway comedy, part circus, part carnival--to fill the Hippodrome. It was the most expensive production that Broadway had ever seen. He signed composer Richard Rodgers and lyricist Lorenz Hart to create the score for “Jumbo.” The story concerned the rivalry of two circus owners whose respective daughter and son fall in love. Jimmy Durante played the role of the agent for the circus elephant, and the show opened with orchestra leader Paul Whiteman riding in on the elephant named Jumbo.

Little Girl Blue

Gloria Grafton as Mickey Considine, the daughter of one of the circus owners, introduced “Little Girl Blue,” one of three popular songs from the show which included “My Romance” and “The Most Beautiful Girl in the World.” Grafton sang “Little Girl Blue” at the end of Act 1 in a blue-lit dream sequence where she imagines she is a child being entertained by a circus. About the first half of the song is an instrumental run through of the melody and her vocal portion of the song lasts just over a minute.

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Hippodrome, NYC

 

„Little Girl Blue” is a simple, evocative Rodgers and Hart ballad that is intoxicating all the same. Lorenz Hart builds his lyric easily and smoothly, but the effect is powerfull: ’count on your fingers, count the raindrops, but don’t count your love.’ Rodgers’ melody sticks to a narrow range, returning to a haunting three-note combination, and then move into circus-like waltz in the patter section.

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Gloria Grafton

 

The song eventually caught on, but not at first because Rose insisted they not be played outside the theater, lest audiences lose interest. That perhaps explains why Margaret Whiting’s version of “Little Girl Blue” didn’t chart until 1947 and played for only one week, topping at #25. It was left to vocalist and pianist Nina Simone to refocus attention on the song which became a signature tune for her in 1958 when she released her debut album entitled Little Girl Blue.

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"Jumbo", poster 1935

 

In the hands of Simone, a classically trained pianist, it is transformed into a quodlibet – a song that uses a combination of melodies from different tunes. In this instance, Simone uses the Christmas carol “Good King Wenceslas” as the intro. It sounds like Lena Horne's 1945-ish recording was the main influence for Nina's recording.

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Nina Simone - Little Girl Blue, Lp 1958

 

In 1962, 27 years after the musical played in NYC, “Jumbo” was made into a film starring Doris Day, Martha Raye, Stephen Boyd and - just as in the 1935 musical - Jimmy Durante. Doris sang “Little Girl Blue” and it was her last film musical.

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"Jumbo" Soundtrack, 1962

 

People may be most familiar with this song as recorded by Janis Joplin in 1969. Her recording was inspired by Nina Simone as she often introduced the song during performances as being a 'Nina Simone song'. Janis altered the lyrics a bit and did a very soulful rendering and since then singers either do a "Janis" version or the original.

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Janis Joplin - "Little Girl Blue" (frame from a documentary film

 

“Jumbo”, the last to play the Hippodrome, opened in 1935 and ran for 253 performances. The giant theater, across the street from the Algonquin Hotel, was destroyed and replaced by a garage. Even though the show lost money because of its exorbitant cost, it enhanced the reputation of Billy Rose and marked a triumphant return to Broadway for Rodgers and Hart who had not completely enjoyed their stint in Hollywood. The relationship of the two men was continuously strained--Rodgers the sober, reliable one and Hart the neurotic alcoholic who would periodically drop out of sight. However, together they produced a startling number of hit songs which have maintained popularity for generations.

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Rodgers & Hart

 

Since 1969 the song has remained popular being recorded by both singers and jazz musicians. It was recorded by several pop and jazz vocalists like Linda Ronstadt, Betty Carter, Ella Fitzgerald, and Diana Krall. Instrumentally it has been performed by pianists Billy Taylor and Keith Jarrett, guitarists Charlie Byrd and Tal Farlow, and saxophonists Gerry Mulligan, Sonny Rollins, and Stan Getz.

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Little Girl Bluelyrics by Lorenz Hart


When I was very young
The world was younger than I
As merry as a carousel

The circus tent was strung
With every star in the sky
Above the ring I loved so well

Now the young world has grown old
Gone are the tinsel and gold

Sit there, and count your fingers
What can you do?
Old girl, you're through
Sit there, and count your little fingers
Unlucky, little girl blue

Sit there, and count the raindrops
Falling on you
It's time you knew
All you can count on is the raindrops
That fall on little girl blue

No use, old girl
You may as well surrender
Your hope is getting slender
Why won't somebody send a tender
Blue boy
To cheer little girl blue?

No use, old girl
You may as well surrender
Your hope is getting slender
Why won't somebody send a tender
Blue boy
To cheer little girl blue?

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Jazz Notes Fri, 01 Dec 2017 18:10:18 +0000
The Sky Is Crying (Elmore James) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/1-blues/22610-the-sky-is-crying-elmore-james.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/1-blues/22610-the-sky-is-crying-elmore-james.html The Sky Is Crying (Elmore James)

It has been more than half a century since Elmore James bent over to pull up his socks before going out to play in an Chicago nightclub . . . and went face down on to the floor with his third and final heart attack. Although he was not widely known, the world lost a good one who left an immense legacy. Elmore James is a giant of the blues. His work as a songwriter, singer and guitarist put him near the top of the short list of greats. The songs he wrote and revived - “Dust My Broom”, “Cry For Me Baby” and “Rollin’ and Tumblin’” - are revered as blues standards. He recorded “The Sky Is Crying” in 1959, and it would go on to become another classic of the blues.

The Sky Is Crying

"The Sky Is Crying" is a slow-tempo twelve-bar blues notated in 12/8 time in the key of C. An impromptu song inspired by a Chicago downpour during the recording session, it features James' slide guitar work and vocals. James' unique slide guitar sound on the recording has generated some debate. Accompanying James is his longtime backing band, the Broomdusters: J. T. Brown on saxophone, Johnny Jones on piano, Odie Payne on drums, and Homesick James on bass.

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Elmore James & The Broomdusters

 

In 1959, enterpreneur from N.Y., BobbyRobinson was searching up talent in Chicago for his record company when he saw a cardboard sign on a club announcing "Elmore James Here Tonight". Robinson went in to ask if this were the Elmore James and even asked James to play "Dust My Broom" to prove his identity. The song was a good luck charm again for James, because Robinson wanted to record him.

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Bobby Robinson

 

The following day, James and his band met to rehearse in a band member's apartment. Robinson remembered that the landlady was cooking in the back while outside the rain was pouring down in buckets. Robinson was there when James spontaneously wrote "The Sky Is Crying". Robinson was so impressed that he called around for a studio and the song was recorded that very night.

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Elmore James

 

James, who started his recording career as an electric musician fronting a full band, opted for a loud, full sound seemingly before his peers. Though B. B. King integrated horns into his band, King was influenced by the uptown swing, even jazz, of musicians like Louis Jordan. For King, a full band lent polish to his sound, smoothing out the rough edges and filling out the gaps between just guitar and bassist and drummer.

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Sky is crying, single 1959

 

With James, it's hard not to believe sometimes that he wanted to front a band simply because a band with horns and piano could -- in his case, would -- be louder than a band without. As with the amps he customized so that he could wring more distortion and feedback from them (decades ahead of Spinal Tap), James's band actually intensified the rough edges of its leader's own cacophonous slide and sandpaper-on-gravel voice. Before Willie Dixon's poppy neoprimitivism shaped the Chess sound and while B. B. King used a band to echo jump and swing and jazz, James made the virtually unprecedented move of expanding to increase the hard force of his music.

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Elmore James

 

Though Elmore James is considered the “King of the Slide Guitar”, his influence reached to non-slide players as well. What’s interesting about “The Sky Is Crying” is that it became a signature tune for two other notable non-slide guitarists, Albert King and Stevie Ray Vaughan.

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Stevie Ray Vaughan plays The Sky Is Crying

 

Stevie Ray Vaughan almost single-handedly brought blues to the mainstream in the 1980’s and 90’s with over a dozen Billboard singles and four Grammy awards. He was an astute student of the blues and built his vocal and guitar sounds around many of the Texas players he grew up with, like W.C. Clark and Larry Davis. An undeniable influence was Albert King—especially his crisp staccato and elegant phrasing. Stevie Ray recorded “The Sky Is Crying” in 1985, but it wasn’t released until 1991, a year after he died. Stevie Ray Vaughan and Albert King did a wonderful recording session together in 1983, which was also filmed and they was blazing through “The Sky Is Crying”.

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Elmore James’s blues standards helped bridge blues and rock 'n' roll. No less a personage than Little Richard, the self-proclaimed inventor of rock 'n' roll, admitted that, when he was starting out, there were only two musicians he knew of doing real rock: himself and Elmore James. Brian Jones of the Rolling Stones recounted how, when he first heard Elmore James, "it was like the earth shuddered and stopped on its axis". No wonder, then, that Stones bassist Bill Wyman has said that James was likely the single most important reason for the formation of the Rolling Stones. And no less than Rod Stewart has said that Elmore James was a major influence on his singing style.

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Johnny Winter plays The Sky Is Crying

 

“The Sky Is Crying”, listed as "Elmo James and His Broomdusters", reached number 15 on Billboard magazine's Hot R&B Sides chart in 1960, making it James' last chart showing before his death in 1963. In 1991, the song was inducted into the Blues Foundation Hall of Fame in the "Classics of Blues Recordings" category.

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Elmore James

 

Elmore James - The Sky Is Crying, lyrics


The sky is crying, look at the tears roll down the street
The sky is crying, look at the tears roll down the street
I'm waiting in tears looking for my baby, and I wonder where can she be?

I saw my baby one morning, and she was walking on down the street
I saw my baby one morning, yes she was walking on down the street
Made me feel so good until my poor heart would skip a beat

I got a bad feeling, my baby, my baby don't love me no more
I got a bad feeling, my baby don't love me no more
Now the sky's been crying, the tears rolling down my door

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Sky Is Crying

 

 

 

Stevie Ray Vaughan & Albert King - The Sky is Crying

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Blues Notes Thu, 23 Nov 2017 22:05:07 +0000
It's All Over Now, Baby Blue http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/22521-its-all-over-now-baby-blue.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/22521-its-all-over-now-baby-blue.html It's All Over Now, Baby Blue

In the film Don't Look Back, Dylan sits around his room in London's posh Savoy Hotel, surrounded by hangers-on. Bored, he picks up an acoustic guitar and plays a new song he's just written: "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue." He has an evil grin on his face; after the first two verses, it's the only smile in the room – everyone else looks shattered. The party's definitely over. The song was originally recorded on January 15, 1965 with Dylan’s acoustic guitar and harmonica and William E. Lee’s bass guitar the only instrumentation. The lyrics were heavily influenced by Symbolist poetry and bid farewell to the titular “Baby Blue.”

It's All Over Now, Baby Blue

"It's All Over Now, Baby Blue" is a song performed and featured on his “Bringing It All Back Home” album, released on March 22, 1965 by Columbia Records. It was a huge mystery back then about the real identity of the “Baby Blue” referred in the lyrics. There were even speculations that it might be Bob Dylan himself.

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Bob Dylan - Bringing It All Back Home

 

“Dylan” was a self-chosen name in homage to the great, legendarily self-destructive Welsh poet Dylan Thomas, whose lush, lyric, over-the-top poetry presumably influenced many of Bob Dylan’s songs. At the time it might have seemed an act of extraordinary chutzpah for a Jewish kid from Duluth, Minnesota, named Bob Zimmerman to anoint himself with the poet’s internationally famous name.

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Dylan Thomas

 

In the history of American popular music, Dylan is generally credited with the transforming of the folk-revival movement from its reverent fixation upon traditional ballads to the creation of new, socially engaged, and politically provocative music. The composer/songwriter becomes the performer. And what a performer!

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‘Don't Look Back’ (1967), poster

 

Bob Dylan’s raspy voice and aggressive folk style imprinted itself upon the public when, in his brilliant album “Bringing It All Back Home,” he cultivated a more sophisticated musical idiom, synthesizing folk and rock in a way that would seem inevitable in retrospect; yet, at the time, struck folk music purists as disloyal. Dylan clearly anticipated the formal, aesthetic, and tonal limitations of folk music, even as, by way of LSD experimentation, he explored the myriad possibilities of bending music as one bends one’s mind, toward the surreal, the fantastic, the phantasmagoric.

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Bob Dylan Blue

 

Perhaps his most haunting song, as it’s his most mysterious, is the surreal “It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue”, with its air of a fairy tale in which the end of something (a love affair? a life?) is being reiterated in each refrain in the very face of ‘Strike another match, let’s start anew.’ Like all good poetry, this song of Dylan’s can’t be paraphrased. Like all good music it is both of its time and timeless.

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Bob Dylan sings ”It’s All Over Now Baby Blue”

 

The words constantly at the forefront of the woman’s mind are those of the title, which are repeated in the refrain: ‘It’s all over now, Baby Blue’. The first is negative. In envisaging a time – a ‘now’ – after her anticipated death, she sees her life as a failure. Her life is gone, and with it both her chance of happiness and the opportunity for doing good. The other way of taking the claim is more positive. By the end of the song it might well be the case that ‘it’s all over now’ in that her decision to help others will have brought about the end their misery, and with it her own.

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Joan Baez - It’s All Over Now Baby Blue

 

There’s little reason to see ”It’s All Over Now Baby Blue” as ‘about’ an event in Dylan’s life, such as his adopting a new musical style around the time it was written. Essentially it’s about the mental state of someone trying to renew their life following what they see as a calamity – the breakup of a relationship. Although the woman concerned is being addressed by the narrator, it makes sense to see her for most of the time as addressing herself.

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The Byrds - It’s All Over Now Baby Blue, single

 

So who is Baby Blue? Well, like most of Dylan's subjects, the character is probably an amalgam of personalities in his orbit. There has been much speculation about the real life identity of "Baby Blue", with possibilites including Joan Baez, David Blue, Paul Clayton, Dylan's folk music audience, and even Dylan himself.

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The Grateful Dead - It’s All Over Now Baby Blue

 

“It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue” is a great song, with a colorful cast of characters, a plaintive chorus, and a memorable message. In a way, it treads similar ground as “Like A Rolling Stone” and the “The Times They Are A-Changin’.” The folk guitar chord changes and somber melody alone make listeners prick up their ears to listen. And there is something simply heartbreaking, allusively so, about the chorus line.

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Graham Bonnet - It’s All Over Now Baby Blue

 

"It's All Over Now, Baby Blue" has been covered countless times by a variety of artists from bands like the Byrds, and Animals to Falco, Hugh Masekela, and Bryan Ferry. The Belfast band Them (featuring Van Morrison) recorded a cover of "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue" in 1966. It was later re-released in Germany in December 1973 where the single became a hit in Germany, first entering the charts in February 1974 and peaking at #13, during a chart stay of 14 weeks. The Grateful Dead and solo Jerry Garcia had the song in their extensive repertoire of Dylan songs.

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Them - It’s All Over Now Baby Blue

 

“I had carried that song around in my head for a long time,”- Dylan has said, -“and I remember that when I was writing it, I’d remembered a Gene Vincent song. It had always been one of my favorites, Baby Blue… ‘When first I met my baby/she said how do you do/she looked into my eyes and said/my name is Baby Blue.’ It was one of the songs I used to sing back in high school. Of course, I was singing about a different Baby Blue.”

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Bob Dylan (1965)

 

It's All Over Now, Baby Blue, lyrics


You must leave now, take what you need, you think will last.
But whatever you wish to keep, you better grab it fast.
Yonder stands your orphan with his gun,
Crying like a fire in the sun.
Look out the saints are comin' through
And it's all over now, Baby Blue.

The highway is for gamblers, better use your sense.
Take what you have gathered from coincidence.
The empty-handed painter from your streets
Is drawing crazy patterns on your sheets.
This sky, too, is folding under you
And it's all over now, Baby Blue.

All your seasick sailors, they are rowing home.
All your reindeer armies, are all going home.
The lover who just walked out your door
Has taken all his blankets from the floor.
The carpet, too, is moving under you
And it's all over now, Baby Blue.

Leave your stepping stones behind, something calls for you.
Forget the dead you've left, they will not follow you.
The vagabond who's rapping at your door
Is standing in the clothes that you once wore.
Strike another match, go start anew
And it's all over now, Baby Blue.

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Baby Blue

 

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Pop and Misc. Notes Mon, 06 Nov 2017 16:12:46 +0000
I Can't Give You Anything But Love, Baby http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/25-jazz/22422-i-cant-give-you-anything-but-love-baby.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/25-jazz/22422-i-cant-give-you-anything-but-love-baby.html I Can't Give You Anything but Love, Baby

Legend has it that the idea behind the song came during a stroll Fields and McHugh were taking one evening down Fifth Avenue; they saw a young couple window-shopping at Tiffany's. McHugh and Fields understood that the couple did not have the resources to buy jewelry from Tiffany's, but nevertheless they drew closer to them. It was then they heard the man say, "Gee, honey I'd like to get you a sparkler like that, but right now, i can't give you nothin' but love!" Hearing this, McHugh and Fields rushed to a nearby Steinway Tunnel, and within an hour they came up with "I Can't Give You Anything but Love, Baby".

I Can't Give You Anything but Love, Baby

The song was introduced by Adelaide Hall at Les Ambassadeurs Club in New York in January 1928 in Lew Leslie's ‘Blackbird Revue,’ which opened on Broadway later that year as the highly successful ‘Blackbirds of 1928’ (518 performances), wherein it was performed by Adelaide Hall, Aida Ward, and Willard McLean. Not everybody liked it - one critic called it "a sickly, puerile song" - but its detractors were vastly outnumbered by its admirers, and the sheet music and a recorded version by Cliff Edwards were massive hits.

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Adelaide Hall

 

Dorothy Fields came from a prominent show business family and became a brilliant lyricist in a male-dominated profession. She was the first woman inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame and was honored with a U.S. postage stamp. Her seven-year collaboration with Jimmy McHugh enjoyed its first success. Fields collaborated with Jerome Kern on the Fred Astaire / Ginger Rogers film ‘Swing Time’ (1936), winning an Academy Award for “The Way You Look Tonight.” Fields returned to Broadway and partnered with her librettist brother, Herbert, to write the book for ‘Annie Get Your Gun’ and collaborate on three Cole Porter musicals. Other collaborations produced the songs “Close as Pages in a Book” (1945) with Sigmund Romberg and “Make the Man Love Me” (1951) with Arthur Schwartz. She wrote two shows with composer Cy Coleman. ‘Sweet Charity’ (1966) was an enormous success and was made into a movie starring Shirley MacLaine. ‘Seesaw’ (1973), her last show, won a Tony for Best Musical and enjoyed a respectable run despite a paucity of hit songs.

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Dorothy Fields

 

Jimmy McHugh was a prolific composer. His songs have appeared in hundreds of films (and counting), and many have been recorded by well over 50 artists. He wrote ‘Cotton Club’ shows and enjoyed his first hit with Gene Austin and Irving Mills, “When My Sugar Walks Down the Street” (1924). Then he met aspiring lyricist, Dorothy Fields, who collaborated with him on the successful Broadway show, ‘Blackbirds of 1928’. In Hollywood, they contributed the title tune to ‘Cuban Love Song’ with Herbert Stothart (1931), and in 1935 “I’m in the Mood for Love” became their first Hit Parade song, rising to number one. McHugh’s work with other lyricists produced “I’m Shooting High” (1935) with Ted Koehler and “Say It (Over and Over Again),” “Can’t Get Out of This Mood,” and “Let’s Get Lost” with Frank Loesser (1940). McHugh’s second lengthy partnership, with Harold Adamson, produced “You’re a Sweetheart” and “Where Are You?” (1937). Among patriotic songs, they wrote “Comin’ In on a Wing and a Prayer” (1943) and raised money for the war effort, for which they were honored by President Truman in 1947. Their later hits were “A Hubba-Hubba-Hubba (1945), “It’s a Most Unusual Day” (1948) and “Too Young to Go Steady” (1955).

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Jimmy McHugh

 

‘I Can't Give You Anything but Love, Baby’s’’ popularity can easily be determined from the chart information, especially from 1928. But the chart also establishes the tune’s continued popularity. Obviously, Armstrong’s most famous version of the tune was the one done on March 5, 1929 with Luis Russell, but Armstrong originally encountered it on December 11, 1928. It was done during Armstrong’s last great burst of Chicago recordings with Earl “Fatha” Hines, a session featuring the vocals of the painfully dated.

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Louis Armstrong sings I Can't Give You Anything but Love, Baby (1942)

 

Accompanied by Oscar Peterson’s group, saxophonist Lester Young interprets the melody wonderfully at a swinging medium-slow tempo. He also contributes a fabulous solo, as do Peterson and guitarist Barney Kessel. Vaughan’s nickname of “Sassy” is very appropriate on this slyly-swinging performance. Benny Carter’s big band arrangement features some slick ensemble passages with Sarah Vaughan scatting, along with a nice vibraphone solo by Larry Bunker.

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In the 100-most recorded songs from 1890 -1954, “I Can't Give You Anything But Love, Baby” (1928) is No. 24. The song continues to appeal, including new cover versions, and several uses in popular movies and plays since 2000.

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Aida Ward, 1928

 

NONETHELES:

Although this song is credited to Jimmy McHugh the fact that these parts are in Waller’s handwriting argues strongly that he, not McHugh, was the original composer of the song (see Machlin, “Fats Waller Composes,” Annual Review of Jazz Studies 7, 1994-95). Andy Razaf's biographer Harry Singer discusses a 1929 piece from "The New York Post" about Fats Waller, in which Waller mentions selling a song to a white composer, who put it in a "musical comedy", where it became the major hit, netting royalties of $17,500 for its “composer” who had purchased the tune from Fats for $500. A number of Fats’ colleagues admitted that Fats did make a practice of selling compositions to white songwriters, often for as little as $10.Waller was known to sell songs, and this description would fit "I Can't Give You Anything but Love (Baby)". There is also evidence that McHugh purchased another song from Waller that McHugh copyrighted in 1935.

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Fats Waller - I Can't Give You Anything but Love, Baby (Single, 1939)

 

As to the lyrics, Singer reports that Gladys Redman, Don Redman's widow, went to visit Razaf when he was in the hospital in the early 1970s. According to Gladys, she asked Razaf to sing her his favorite of the lyrics that he had written, and he sang in a hushed voice, "I Can't Give You Anything but Love (Baby)".

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Sarah Vaughan sings I Can't Give You Anything but Love, Baby

 

Despite the controversy over the tune, no one has come forth over the years to question the authorship of the other Fields/McHugh tunes from the show, which are excellent and occasionally resurface in jazz versions: “Digga Digga Doo,” “I Must Have That Man,” and “Doin’ the New Lowdown.”

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Jimmy McHugh and Dorothy Fields

 

Finally a comment from Dorothy Fields' son, David Lahm:

 

" While I think it's pointless trying to identify the best song ever written in this American style we call "standards". I don't believe there's a more beloved song than ‘I Can't Give You Anything But Love.’ I have played this song many times to those in their 80s and 90s and it's as if this song has given validation and confirmation to many memories - or taken the place of memories of when they were young, optimistic and the light of someone's life. It's as if someone understands what it's like to look so far behind themselves in search of what they once were. I think that person who understands is my mother."

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‘Blackbirds of 1928’, poster

 

I can't give you anything but love (baby)


I can't give you anything but love, baby
That's the only thing I've plenty of, baby
Dream a while scheme a while
We're sure to find
Happiness and I guess
All those things you've always pined for
Gee, I'd like to see you looking swell, baby
Diamond bracelets Woolworth doesn't sell, baby
Till that lucky day
You know darned well, baby
I can't give you anything but love

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Jazz Notes Wed, 18 Oct 2017 15:57:14 +0000
L'Après-midi d'un Faune (The Afternoon of a Faun) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/3-classical/22304-lapres-midi-dun-faune-the-afternoon-of-a-faun.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/3-classical/22304-lapres-midi-dun-faune-the-afternoon-of-a-faun.html L'Après-midi d'un Faune (The Afternoon of a Faun)

Stéphane Mallarmé's eclogue “L'Après-midi d'un Faune” ("The Afternoon of a Faun") was published in 1876. Debussy first set a poem by Mallarmé to music in 1884, at the age of 22. Three years later, the young composer joined the circle of poets and artists who met at Mallarmé's house every Tuesday night for discussions and companionship. Thus he was thoroughly familiar with the poet's style before he began work on his prelude to "The Afternoon of a Faun" in 1892.

Debussy - The Afternoon of a Faun

Stéphane Mallarmé (1842-1898) was one of the greatest innovators in the history of French poetry. His works, which abound in complex symbols and images, seek to represent states of mind rather than ideas, express moods rather than tell stories.

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Stéphane Mallarmé

 

This poem is about a faun who awakes in the mist of forest nymphs. The first-person narrator is a faun, a mythological creature who is half man and half goat. The faun lives in the woods, near a river surrounded by reedy marshes; he is daydreaming about nymphs who may be real or mere figments of his imagination. The faun's desire is filtered through the vagueness of its object as he recalls past dreams, which emerge from the shadows only to recede into the darkness again.

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Faun (& nymph)

 

Debussy pondered the poetic source material for many years. “The Afternoon of a Faun” deals with a faun’s erotic fantasies inspired by nymphs (“Was it a dream I loved?”). The classical setting and overt sexuality of the text made it a touchstone for debates over the future of literature. Debussy’s tastes made him susceptible to the poem’s allure, for he had already begun setting similar texts by Baudelaire and Maeterlinck when work on the Prelude commenced in 1892. At first, he planned a full accompaniment to each moment of the poem, perhaps even a mini staged drama. But by the time of completion, he had wisely settled on a “very free illustration of the beautiful poem of Mallarmé.”

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Claude Debussy, 1884

 

The iconic opening theme outlines a descending tritone from C-sharp to G natural using solo flute. Uncertain tonal implications are given new light when the theme subsequently receives a harmonic foundation in a seventh chord on D. Above shimmering glissandi in harp and pulsating chromatic motion in the winds, the flute arabesques become gradually more ornate, more seductive.

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Main theme, flute solo

 

The flute’s theme, recurring throughout the work, though it is not intended as a literal translation of the poem. The line progresses throughout the piece and its metamorphoses account for the Prelude’s richness of texture and harmony.

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Nijinsky as Faun

 

Debussy closes the first section in B major and then moves into a more agitated episode culminating in soaring strings. Tonal color, built from radiant mixtures of whole-tone and pentatonic elements, turns gently to A flat major. The next scene, (a pas de deux in Nijinsky’s choreographed version,) suggests the faun embracing a nymph. Its poignant union of rapture and longing centers on the tritone-related chord progression. Debussy’s lines undulate and swell, rise and recede. At the last part of the dance, he calms the rampant sensuality down to a violin solo leading seamlessly to a reprise of the opening theme. Almost the entire final three minutes are needed to cool off from the heat of passionate embraces. At the last, Debussy’s faun strikes a languorous pose in serene E major.

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The afternoon ..., flute score

 

About his composition Debussy wrote: “The music of this prelude is a very free illustration of Mallarmé’s beautiful poem. By no means does it claim to be a synthesis of it. Rather there is a succession of scenes through which pass the desires and dreams of the faun in the heat of the afternoon. Then, tired of pursuing the timorous flight of nymphs and naiads, he succumbs to intoxicating sleep, in which he can finally realize his dreams of possession in universal Nature.”

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Claude Debussy

 

Paul Valéry reported that Mallarmé himself was unhappy with his poem being used as the basis for music: “He believed that his own music was sufficient, and that even with the best intentions in the world, it was a veritable crime as far as poetry was concerned to juxtapose poetry and music, even if it were the finest music there is.”

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Stéphane Mallarmé

 

However, Maurice Dumesnil states in his biography of Debussy that Mallarmé was enchanted by Debussy’s composition, citing a short letter from Mallarmé to Debussy that read: “I have just come out of the concert, deeply moved. The marvel! Your illustration of the Afternoon of a Faun, which presents a dissonance with my text only by going much further, really, into nostalgia and into light, with finesse, with sensuality, with richness. I press your hand admiringly, Debussy. Yours, Mallarmé.”

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Stéphane Mallarmé as Faun

 

Prelude to “The Afternoon of a Faun” signaled a new era in compositional style and intent, even though that new style was not to everyone’s liking. Some saw it as a liberation from the weighty textures and Teutonic mythology that Wagnerism had spread over much European music. Debussy was leaner and more evocative. Others thought it did not go nearly far enough in that direction; the Prelude’s dreamy use of non-tonal pitch collections effused a world of shadows and perfume when a harsh dose of bright reality was needed.

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Afternoon of Faun by Levy-Dhurmer

 

Two aspects of Debussy's style bear special mention here: his use of chromaticism and his handling of orchestral color. Chromaticism had been one of the main musical means to express sensuality at least since Wagner's Tristan und Isolde, a work that exerted a decisive influence on the young Debussy. But Debussy's use of chromaticism is more subdued and less goal-oriented than Wagner's. His instrumentation, much more restricted than Wagner's (no brass except horns, no percussion except the soft-toned antique cymbals) causes us to perceive the faun's sensuality at a certain remove. Mallarmé referred to the faun's syrinx as an "instrument des fuites" (translated as "elusive instrument"; literally, perhaps, "instrument of evasion"); with his novel rhythmic and harmonic language, Debussy managed to render that elusive/evasive quality of the faun's self-expression.

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Claude Debussy, 1893

 

It was first performed in Paris on 22 December 1894, conducted by Gustave Doret. The flute solo was played by Georges Barrère.

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Afternoon of Faun

 

Stephane Mallarmé - L'après-midi d'un faune (Églogue)

 

Le Faune:
Ces nymphes, je les veux perpétuer.
Si clair,
Leur incarnat léger, qu'il voltige dans l'air
Assoupi de sommeils touffus.

Aimai-je un rêve ?
Mon doute, amas de nuit ancienne, s'achève
En maint rameau subtil, qui, demeuré les vrais
Bois mêmes, prouve, hélas ! que bien seul je m'offrais
Pour triomphe la faute idéale de roses.

Réfléchissons...
ou si les femmes dont tu gloses
Figurent un souhait de tes sens fabuleux !
Faune, l'illusion s'échappe des yeux bleus
Et froids, comme une source en pleurs, de la plus chaste :
Mais, l'autre tout soupirs, dis-tu qu'elle contraste
Comme brise du jour chaude dans ta toison ?
Que non ! par l'immobile et lasse pâmoison
Suffoquant de chaleurs le matin frais s'il lutte,
Ne murmure point d'eau que ne verse ma flûte
Au bosquet arrosé d'accords ; et le seul vent
Hors des deux tuyaux prompt à s'exhaler avant
Qu'il disperse le son dans une pluie aride,
C'est, à l'horizon pas remué d'une ride
Le visible et serein souffle artificiel
De l'inspiration, qui regagne le ciel.

O bords siciliens d'un calme marécage
Qu'à l'envi de soleils ma vanité saccage
Tacite sous les fleurs d'étincelles, Contez
« Que je coupais ici les creux roseaux domptés
« Par le talent ; quand, sur l'or glauque de lointaines
« Verdures dédiant leur vigne à des fontaines,
« Ondoie une blancheur animale au repos :
« Et qu'au prélude lent où naissent les pipeaux
« Ce vol de cygnes, non ! de naïades se sauve
« Ou plonge... »

Inerte, tout brûle dans l'heure fauve
Sans marquer par quel art ensemble détala
Trop d'hymen souhaité de qui cherche le la :
Alors m'éveillerai-je à la ferveur première,
Droit et seul, sous un flot antique de lumière,
Lys ! et l'un de vous tous pour l'ingénuité.

Autre que ce doux rien par leur lèvre ébruité,
Le baiser, qui tout bas des perfides assure,
Mon sein, vierge de preuve, atteste une morsure
Mystérieuse, due à quelque auguste dent ;
Mais, bast ! arcane tel élut pour confident
Le jonc vaste et jumeau dont sous l'azur on joue :
Qui, détournant à soi le trouble de la joue,
Rêve, dans un solo long, que nous amusions
La beauté d'alentour par des confusions
Fausses entre elle-même et notre chant crédule ;
Et de faire aussi haut que l'amour se module
Évanouir du songe ordinaire de dos
Ou de flanc pur suivis avec mes regards clos,
Une sonore, vaine et monotone ligne.

Tâche donc, instrument des fuites, ô maligne
Syrinx, de refleurir aux lacs où tu m'attends !
Moi, de ma rumeur fier, je vais parler longtemps
Des déesses ; et par d'idolâtres peintures
A leur ombre enlever encore des ceintures :
Ainsi, quand des raisins j'ai sucé la clarté,
Pour bannir un regret par ma feinte écarté,
Rieur, j'élève au ciel d'été la grappe vide
Et, soufflant dans ses peaux lumineuses, avide
D'ivresse, jusqu'au soir je regarde au travers.

O nymphes, regonflons des souvenirs divers.
« Mon œil, trouant le joncs, dardait chaque encolure
« Immortelle, qui noie en l'onde sa brûlure
« Avec un cri de rage au ciel de la forêt ;
« Et le splendide bain de cheveux disparaît
« Dans les clartés et les frissons, ô pierreries !
« J'accours ; quand, à mes pieds, s'entrejoignent (meurtries
« De la langueur goûtée à ce mal d'être deux)
« Des dormeuses parmi leurs seuls bras hasardeux ;
« Je les ravis, sans les désenlacer, et vole
« A ce massif, haï par l'ombrage frivole,
« De roses tarissant tout parfum au soleil,
« Où notre ébat au jour consumé soit pareil. »

Je t'adore, courroux des vierges, ô délice
Farouche du sacré fardeau nu qui se glisse
Pour fuir ma lèvre en feu buvant, comme un éclair
Tressaille ! la frayeur secrète de la chair :
Des pieds de l'inhumaine au cœur de la timide
Qui délaisse à la fois une innocence, humide
De larmes folles ou de moins tristes vapeurs.

« Mon crime, c'est d'avoir, gai de vaincre ces peurs
« Traîtresses, divisé la touffe échevelée
« De baisers que les dieux gardaient si bien mêlée :
« Car, à peine j'allais cacher un rire ardent
« Sous les replis heureux d'une seule (gardant
« Par un doigt simple, afin que sa candeur de plume
« Se teignît à l'émoi de sa sœur qui s'allume,
« La petite, naïve et ne rougissant pas : )
« Que de mes bras, défaits par de vagues trépas,
« Cette proie, à jamais ingrate se délivre
« Sans pitié du sanglot dont j'étais encore ivre. »

Tant pis ! vers le bonheur d'autres m'entraîneront
Par leur tresse nouée aux cornes de mon front :
Tu sais, ma passion, que, pourpre et déjà mûre,
Chaque grenade éclate et d'abeilles murmure ;
Et notre sang, épris de qui le va saisir,
Coule pour tout l'essaim éternel du désir.
A l'heure où ce bois d'or et de cendres se teinte
Une fête s'exalte en la feuillée éteinte :
Etna ! c'est parmi toi visité de Vénus
Sur ta lave posant tes talons ingénus,
Quand tonne une somme triste ou s'épuise la flamme.
Je tiens la reine !

O sûr châtiment...
Non, mais l'âme
De paroles vacante et ce corps alourdi
Tard succombent au fier silence de midi :
Sans plus il faut dormir en l'oubli du blasphème,
Sur le sable altéré gisant et comme j'aime
Ouvrir ma bouche à l'astre efficace des vins !
Couple, adieu ; je vais voir l'ombre que tu devins.

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Claude Debussy

 

The Afternoon of a Faun (English translation)

The Faun:
These nymphs, I would perpetuate them.
So bright
Their crimson flesh that hovers there, light
In the air drowsy with dense slumbers.
Did I love a dream?
My doubt, mass of ancient night, ends extreme
In many a subtle branch, that remaining the true
Woods themselves, proves, alas, that I too
Offered myself, alone, as triumph, the false ideal of roses.
Let’s see….
or if those women you note
Reflect your fabulous senses’ desire!
Faun, illusion escapes from the blue eye,
Cold, like a fount of tears, of the most chaste:
But the other, she, all sighs, contrasts you say
Like a breeze of day warm on your fleece?
No! Through the swoon, heavy and motionless
Stifling with heat the cool morning’s struggles
No water, but that which my flute pours, murmurs
To the grove sprinkled with melodies: and the sole breeze
Out of the twin pipes, quick to breathe
Before it scatters the sound in an arid rain,
Is unstirred by any wrinkle of the horizon,
The visible breath, artificial and serene,
Of inspiration returning to heights unseen.
 
O Sicilian shores of a marshy calm
My vanity plunders vying with the sun,
Silent beneath scintillating flowers, 

RELATE
‘That I was cutting hollow reeds here tamed
By talent: when, on the green gold of distant
Verdure offering its vine to the fountains,
An animal whiteness undulates to rest:
And as a slow prelude in which the pipes exist
This flight of swans, no, of Naiads cower
Or plunge…’

Inert, all things burn in the tawny hour
Not seeing by what art there fled away together
Too much of hymen desired by one who seeks there
The natural A: then I’ll wake to the primal fever
Erect, alone, beneath the ancient flood, light’s power,
Lily! And the one among you all for artlessness.
Other than this sweet nothing shown by their lip, the kiss
That softly gives assurance of treachery,
My breast, virgin of proof, reveals the mystery
Of the bite from some illustrious tooth planted;
Let that go! Such the arcane chose for confidant,
The great twin reed we play under the azure ceiling,
That turning towards itself the cheek’s quivering,
Dreams, in a long solo, so we might amuse
The beauties round about by false notes that confuse
Between itself and our credulous singing;
And create as far as love can, modulating,
The vanishing, from the common dream of pure flank
Or back followed by my shuttered glances,
Of a sonorous, empty and monotonous line.
 
Try then, instrument of flights, O malign
Syrinx by the lake where you await me, to flower again!
I, proud of my murmur, intend to speak at length
Of goddesses: and with idolatrous paintings
Remove again from shadow their waists’ bindings:
So that when I’ve sucked the grapes’ brightness
To banish a regret done away with by my pretence,
Laughing, I raise the emptied stem to the summer’s sky
And breathing into those luminous skins, then I,
Desiring drunkenness, gaze through them till evening.
O nymphs, let’s rise again with many memories.

‘My eye, piercing the reeds, speared each immortal
Neck that drowns its burning in the water
With a cry of rage towards the forest sky;
And the splendid bath of hair slipped by
In brightness and shuddering, O jewels!
I rush there: when, at my feet, entwine (bruised
By the languor tasted in their being-two’s evil)
Girls sleeping in each other’s arms’ sole peril:
I seize them without untangling them and run
To this bank of roses wasting in the sun
All perfume, hated by the frivolous shade
Where our frolic should be like a vanished day.’

I adore you, wrath of virgins, O shy
Delight of the nude sacred burden that glides
Away to flee my fiery lip, drinking
The secret terrors of the flesh like quivering
Lightning: from the feet of the heartless one
To the heart of the timid, in a moment abandoned
By innocence wet with wild tears or less sad vapours.

‘Happy at conquering these treacherous fears
My crime’s to have parted the dishevelled tangle
Of kisses that the gods kept so well mingled:
For I’d scarcely begun to hide an ardent laugh
In one girl’s happy depths (holding back
With only a finger, so that her feathery candour
Might be tinted by the passion of her burning sister,
The little one, naïve and not even blushing)
Than from my arms, undone by vague dying,
This prey, forever ungrateful, frees itself and is gone,
Not pitying the sob with which I was still drunk.’

No matter! Others will lead me towards happiness
By the horns on my brow knotted with many a tress:
You know, my passion, how ripe and purple already
Every pomegranate bursts, murmuring with the bees:
And our blood, enamoured of what will seize it,
Flows for all the eternal swarm of desire yet.
At the hour when this wood with gold and ashes heaves
A feast’s excited among the extinguished leaves:
Etna! It’s on your slopes, visited by Venus
Setting in your lava her heels so artless,
When a sad slumber thunders where the flame burns low.
I hold the queen!
O certain punishment…
No, but the soul
Void of words, and this heavy body,
Succumb to noon’s proud silence slowly:
With no more ado, forgetting blasphemy, I
Must sleep, lying on the thirsty sand, and as I
Love, open my mouth to wine’s true constellation!

Farewell to you, both: I go to see the shadow you have become.

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Stéphane Mallarmé by Manet, 1876

 

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Classical Notes Tue, 26 Sep 2017 15:48:29 +0000
How Blue Can You Get? http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/1-blues/22176-how-blue-can-you-get.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/1-blues/22176-how-blue-can-you-get.html How Blue Can You Get?

Johnny Moore's Three Blazers was a popular African-American vocal group in the 1940s and 1950s. In 1946, they had their greatest success with "Driftin' Blues", sung by Brown. The group followed up the success of "Driftin' Blues" with several other big R&B hits, including "Sunny Road" (1946), "New Orleans Blues" (1947), and "Merry Christmas Baby" (1947). In 1949, Johnny Moore with his brother, Oscar Moore, on guitars, Billy Valentine on piano and vocal, and Johnny Miller on bass recorded "How Blue Can You Get" in the West Coast blues-style. It was included on the jazz and blues compilation album ‘Singin' the Blues’ (1960). In 1951, Louis Jordan recorded the song using a big band arrangement.

How Blue Can You Get?

"How Blue Can You Get" is a slow twelve-bar blues composed by Leonard Feather. Words are credited to Jane Feather, his wife.

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Johnny Moore's Three Blazers, 1949

 

Leonard Geoffrey Feather (1914, London, Eng.— 1994, Encino, Calif., U.S.), British-born American jazz journalist, producer, and songwriter whose standard reference work, ‘The Encyclopedia of Jazz,‘ and energetic advocacy placed him among the most influential of jazz critics. Described by jazz great Louis Armstrong as "one cat that really knows what's going on," and by Leonard Bernstein as an author who "opens one's eyes to a perspective view of jazz that is astonishingly new and rich," Feather's creative background brought musical authenticity and a well-informed viewpoint to his criticism, which appeared regularly in the Los Angeles Times.

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Jane, Leonard & Lorraine Feather

 

He was also, however, an artist who had a significant impact on jazz. He described himself as a modestly talented clarinetist and pianist, but he was a skilled and busy songwriter and composer. As a producer and musical entrepreneur, Feather was instrumental in the hiring of Benny Carter for the BBC Dance Orchestra in the early 1930s. In the next decade, he produced and composed for sessions by Armstrong, Carter, Duke Ellington and Dizzy Gillespie, and he wrote arrangements for Count Basie.

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Leonard Feather

 

Feather also produced the debut recordings of Sarah Vaughan, George Shearing and Dinah Washington. His "Evil Gal Blues," "Salty Papa Blues" and "Blowtop Blues" launched Washington's career. In the mid-1940s, he was responsible for establishment of the annual Esquire jazz polls, and in 1945, he produced the first record album chronicling the work of female jazz musicians.

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Louis Jordan and His Tympany Five

 

With the publication of "Inside Be-Bop" (1949), and the release of the initial "Encyclopedia of Jazz" (1955), Feather became established as an important jazz journalist, commentator and critic. Subsequent writings included further editions of the "Encyclopedia" (with Ira Gitler), "From Satchmo to Miles," "The Passion for Jazz" and "The Jazz Years: Earwitness to an Era."

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Leonard Feather - Encyclopedia of Jazz Vol.1, 1955

 

"How Blue Can You Get", his biggest hit was very popular song for B.B. King. Feather described the song as having "the type of intimate instrumental setting heard in so many best blues vocal performances of the 1940s". B.B. King first recorded the song as "Downhearted", which was included on his 1963 ‘Blues in My Heart’ album. The song is performed at "a steady, stately pace, its groove punctuated by B.B.'s stinging runs and wailing, sustained notes", according to King biographer David McGee. King later re-recorded the song as "How Blue Can You Get" and ABC-Paramount Records released it as a single in 1964.

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B.B.King - InMy Heart, album with "Downhearted"

 

"How Blue Can You Get" reached number 97 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop chart in 1964 (Billboard's R&B chart was suspended at the time). The song became a fixture in King's live shows "with enough good punchlines for B.B. to keep it in his act for decades". A live version of the song first appeared on the ‘Live at the Regal’ album recorded in Chicago in 1964. Since then, live versions of the song have been included on several live B.B. King albums.

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B.B.King - How Blue Can You Get, ABC-Paramount single

 

The song has been recorded by many, many several blues and other artists, including Duke Ellington, Albert Collins, James Cotton, Howard Tate, Magic Slim, Fleetwood Mac, Jeff Healey, Cyndi Lauper and Greg & Duane Allman. King also performed the song in both the Blues Brothers 2000 movie as well as on the movie soundtrack, along with a medley of other artists credited as "The Louisiana Gator Boys", a rival blues supergroup fronted by King's character, Malvern Gasperone.

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The Louisiana Gator Boys

 

How Blue Can You Get, lyrics


Ive been down hearted baby
Ever since the day we met
I said ive been down hearted baby
Ever since the day we met
Our love is nothing but the blues
Baby, how blue can you get?

Youre evil when im with you, baby
And youre jealous when were apart
I said youre evil when im with you, baby
And youre jealous when were apart
How blue can you get baby
The answer is right here in my heart

I gave you a brand new ford
But you said: i want a cadillac
I bought you a ten dollar dinner
And you said: thanks for the snack
I let you live in my pent house
You said it just a shack
I gave seven children
And now you wanna give them back
I said ive been down hearted baby
Ever since the day we met
Our love is nothing but the blues
Baby, how blue can you get?

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Jeff Healey play How Blue Can You Get?

 

 

 

B.B. King - How Blue Can You Get (Live at Farm Aid 1985)

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Blues Notes Sat, 02 Sep 2017 10:21:56 +0000
Ai Se Eu Te Pego (Oh, If I Catch You!) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/27-latin/22116-ai-se-eu-te-pego-oh-if-i-catch-you.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/27-latin/22116-ai-se-eu-te-pego-oh-if-i-catch-you.html Ai Se Eu Te Pego (Oh, If I Catch You!)

There was a virus spreading around the globe, but the symptoms weren’t fever or body aches. No, this epidemic manifested itself in giggles and grins, waving hands, pumping hips and a bubbly chorus that goes like this: “Nossa, nossa, assim voce me mata. Ai, se eu te pego, ai, se eu te pego!” (Wow, wow, you’re gonna kill me that way. Oh, if I catch you, Oh my God, if I catch you!)

Ai Se Eu Te Pego (Oh, If I Catch You!)

“Ai Se Eu Te Pego” (Oh If I Catch You), a pop song by Brazilian heartthrob Michel Telo, may not be a famous composer, but neither were “I Wanna Hold Your Hand” or “Macarena,” its predecessors as massive, mysterious global hits. Indeed, “Ai Se Eu Te Pego” may be the most popular song to come out of Brazil since “The Girl From Ipanema.”

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Brazilian songwriters Sharon Acioly and Antônio Dyggs penned this song in 2008 and it was first recorded by Os Meninos de Seu Zeh, before being covered by various regional Brazilian bands. Realizing that it had the potential to become a national hit in Brazil, Dyggs offered the tune to Brazilian singer-songwriter, Michel Teló. The songwriter's confidence in his tune proved correct.

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Sharon Acioly

 

Michel Teló, who was born on January 21, 1981 in Medianeira, Paraná, had been singing since he was six years old, as well as playing the accordion, the piano, and the harmonica. In 1997, he joined the Brazilian band Grupo Tradição, with whom he released several successful albums and singles as a singer, songwriter, and harmonica player. In 2008, Teló decided to leave the band; his final album with Grupo Tradição, ‘Micareta Sertaneja 2’, was nominated for a Latin Grammy in the Brazilian music category.

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Michel Teló & Antônio Dyggs

 

Teló's first solo album, 2009's ‘Balada Sertaneja’, featured the hit single "Ei, Psiu! Beijo, Me Liga," while his 2010 live album, ‘Ao Vivo,’ was awarded gold status and sported the single "Fugidinha," which reached number one in the Brazilian Hot 100 charts. The following year, Teló released his signature song, "Ai Se Eu Te Pego!," which was made popular when Brazilian soccer player Neymar danced to it in a YouTube video that received several million clicks -- a dance that was performed by several other soccer players as well (among them Spanish players Marcelo Vieira and Cristiano Ronaldo, and Polish player Adrian Mierzejewski).

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Grupo Tradição

 

Télo's accompanying 2011 live album, ‘Michel Na Balada,’ which featured "Ai Se Eu Te Pego!," was nominated for a Latin Grammy Award as Best Sertanejo Album. "Ai Se Eu Te Pego!” had already been a regional hit in Brazil in 2008, but Teló's version of the song became a hit in Brazil, reaching No. 1. Later, the song also reached No. 1 in 23 countries in Europe and Latin America. In the United States, the single topped both the Billboard Hot Latin Songs and Latin Pop Songs and peaked at No. 81 on the Billboard Hot 100, making Michel Teló the third Brazilian solo act to have a song on the Billboard Hot 100, following Sérgio Mendes and Morris Albert.

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Michel Na Balada, 2001 album

 

The single was the sixth best-selling single of 2012, selling 7.2 million copies worldwide and placing it on the list of best-selling singles of all time. The song exemplifies the global, viral capabilities — and oddities — of the Internet. The official video, with Telo singing along with an adoring crowd of Brazilian beauties, has over 760 million views as of July 2017.

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Dancing Neymar

 

“There’s some magic element to the song,” Telo said by telephone. “We recently toured in Europe and people were singing the song in Germany, in Holland, in Russia, in Switzerland, all these places. These people don’t know a word of Portuguese and they’re singing along.” “We could never have imagined this,” said Som Livre CEO Marcelo Soares. “This was a first for us, a first for any of our artists, a first for anywhere in Brazil. It was absolutely unexpected.”

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Michel Telo

 

The song represents something new in Brazil as well. Part of the 1960s allure of “Girl from Ipanema” (also about a man admiring a passing beauty) was the sensual, nostalgic atmosphere it radiated. In a time of financial anxiety and political divisiveness, perhaps “Ai Se Eu Te Pego” offers another kind of escape, to a carefree moment of celebration and unity. “The song reflects the happiness and joy and the identity of the Brazilian people, and that’s what’s being carried around the world,” Telo said.

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Antonio Dyggs, Sharon Acioly & Michel Telo

 

Ai Se Eu Te Pego (Michel Teló)


Nossa, nossa
Assim você me mata
Ai, se eu te pego,
Ai, ai, se eu te pego

Delícia, delícia
Assim você me mata
Ai, se eu te pego
Ai, ai, se eu te pego

No Sábado na balada
A galera começou a dançar
E passou a menina mais linda
Tomei coragem e comecei a falar

Nossa, nossa
Assim você me mata
Ai, se eu te pego
Ai, ai se eu te pego

Delícia, delícia
Assim você me mata
Ai, se eu te pego
Ai, ai, se eu te pego

No Sábado na balada
A galera começou a dançar
E passou a menina mais linda
Tomei coragem e comecei a falar

Nossa, nossa
Assim você me mata
Ai, se eu te pego
Ai, ai se eu te pego

Delícia, delícia
Assim você me mata
Ai, se eu te pego
Ai, ai, se eu te pego

Nossa, nossa
Assim você me mata
Ai, se eu te pego
Ai, ai se eu te pego

Delícia, delícia
Assim você me mata
Ai, se eu te pego
Ai, ai, se eu te pego

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Inna - Ai Se Eu Te Pego

 

If I Catch You (Michel Telo)


Ow, wow, this way you're gonna kill me
Oh, if I catch you
Oh, my God if I catch you

Delicious, delicious
This way you're gonna kill me
Oh, if I catch you
Oh, my God, if I catch you

Saturday at the party
Everybody started to dance
Then the prettiest girl past in front of me
I got closer and started to say...

Wow, wow, this way you're gonna kill me
Oh, if I catch you
Oh, my God, if I catch you

Delicious, delicious
This way you're gonna kill me
Oh, if I catch you
Oh, my God if I catch you

Saturday at the party
Everybody started to dance
Then the prettiest girl past in front of me
I got closer and started to say...

Wow, wow, this way you're gonna kill me
Oh, if I catch you
Oh, my God, if I catch you

Delicious, delicious
This way you're gonna kill me
Oh, if I catch you
Oh, my God if I catch you

Wow, wow, this way you're gonna kill me
Oh, if I catch you
Oh, my God, if I catch you

Delicious, delicious
This way you're gonna kill me
Oh, if I catch you
Oh, my God if I catch you 

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Ai Se Eu Te Pego

 

 

Michel Teló & Neymar - Ai Se Eu Te Pego

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Latin French, Italian Notes Sun, 20 Aug 2017 14:08:52 +0000