Music Notes The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes.html Sat, 27 May 2017 01:03:03 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Zbigniew Wodecki 6.05.1950 – 22.05.2017 http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/28-polish/21600-the-voice-of-poland-natalia-sikora-cry-baby.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/28-polish/21600-the-voice-of-poland-natalia-sikora-cry-baby.html Zbigniew Wodecki (6.05.1950 – 22.05.2017)


Zbigniew Wodecki – Let It Heal In Us (1995)

 

 

Zbigniew Wodecki – Chalupy Welcome To (1985)

 

 

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Polish Notes Fri, 12 May 2017 20:28:30 +0000
Smoke Gets in Your Eyes http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/21579-smoke-gets-in-your-eyes.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/21579-smoke-gets-in-your-eyes.html Smoke Gets in Your Eyes

"Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" is from Kern's musical Roberta, his last big Broadway venture. Based on the Alice Duer Miller novel “Gowns by Roberta,” it is a sophisticated comedy about an American football player and a Russian princess. The song that carried the show was "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes," which, in earlier incarnations, had been intended as a fast tap dance number in Show Boat, then as a march for an NBC radio series. It was lyricist and librettist Otto Harbach's idea to slow the song down and to add a lyric based on an old Russian proverb. Beautiful Ukranian-born Tamara Drasin was chosen to play the part of Princess Stephanie and to sing "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes," and it is she who we hear on this recording. In the show Tamara accompanied herself on guitar, but on this recording she is accompanied by a dance orchestra. Since Harbach's staging called for a jazz band onstage, the dance band accompaniment may not be totally out of place here.

Smoke Gets in Your Eyes

With music by Jerome Kern, lyrics by Otto Harbach, and starring Bob Hope, 'Roberta' became one of the most popular Broadway musicals from the 1930s. Its success came in the early and worst years of the depression when poor box office receipts were mercilessly closing most shows. So well did 'Roberta' go over, in fact, that it was brilliantly adapted to the screen in 1935 in a version starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers.

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Jerome Kern, Otto Harbach - Roberta 1933

 

Jerome Kern (1885-1945) is arguably the father modern American musical theater. Born in New York of German heritage, he attended the New York College of Music and began to break into Broadway theater during the first decade of the century by having songs of his interpolated into shows. Kern really entered the history books with “Show Boat”(1927), the first truly modern American musical, with an integrated story and such memorable songs as "Ol' Man River" and "Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man."

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Jerome Kern

 

Like many of his contemporaries, Kern divided his time between Broadway and Hollywood in the '30s, after sound came into the movies. Music composed by Jerome Kern has been popular with jazz artists for so long it's hard to imagine how horrified Kern was by the liberties jazz interpreters took with his finely-crafted melodies. Kern worked steadily -- he wrote or contributed to 37 shows during his career -- and was beginning work on Annie Get Your Gun when he died suddenly in 1945. He left behind one of the richest catalogs of show music in history.

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Tamara Drasin

 

Born in Salt Lake City, in 1873, Otto Harbach studied at the Collegiate Institute, then at Knox College before becoming an English professor. He was on the staff of Whitman College from 189 5-1901, then moved to New York. Harbach met composer Karl Hoschna and the two became a songwriting team, scoring their first hit with 1908's "Cuddle Up a Little Closer," from their score for Broadway's ‘The Three Twins.’ The duo collaborated on more successful shows until Hoschna's death in December 1911. After Hoschna was gone, Harbach began working with composer Rudolf Friml. In 1920, Harbach teamed up with another lyricist-librettist, Oscar Hammerstein II, for the most successful period of Harbach's career.

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Otto Harbach

 

Besides his three main collaborators, Harbach also wrote with many others over the years, including Herbert Stothart, Vincent Youmans, George Gershwin, Sigmund Romberg, and Jerome Kern. Some of Harbach's best-known songs are "Every Little Movement" (1910), "Sympathy" (1912), "The Love Nest" (1920), "Rose-Marie" (1924), "The Desert Song" (1926), "Yesterdays" and "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes," (1933). Many of the musicals that Harbach worked on were later turned into movies.

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Gertrude Niesen - Smoke Gets In Your Eyes, 1933

 

Eighty three years ago - in January 1934 - Paul Whiteman and his Orchestra had the Number One record in America. And 58 years ago - that would be January 1959 - the Platters had the Number One record in America.

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Paul Whiteman and his Orchestra

 

"Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" undertook an interesting journey before reaching the Platters. After the song made its debut in the 1933 musical Roberta, the composition was released as a single later that year by Gertrude Niesen. Two years later it appeared in the 1935 movie adaptation, this time performed by Irene Dunne. The 1952 remake found Kathryn Grayson performing the ballad, and her operatic voice beautifully graced the song's lovely melody. But the Platters' take represents a change in sound, when a more unrestrained approach courtesy of R&B found its way to popular music.

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The Platters

 

Their version is truly marvelous, thanks in large part to Tony Williams' rich lead vocal and arranger David Carroll's lush orchestration. The group's exquisite harmonies inject doo-wop into the ballad, thereby modernizing the Broadway tune. But it's Williams' intense performance that transforms "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" into something more, a torch song oozing longing and sensuality. His voice dips and soars, alternates in tone and volume, dramatizing the lyrics. As Williams' voice reaches a crescendo at the song's end, his passion emanates through the speakers, releasing both the agony and ecstasy that previous versions do not reveal.

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The Platters sing Smoke Gets in Your Eyes

 

When the group was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1990, the museum cited the Platters for best representing a "golden era when pop, rhythm & blues and rock and roll flowed together in perfect harmony." Indeed, the Platters effectively bridged these genres.

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The Platters - Smoke Gets in Your Eyes, Mercury 1958

 

This is the song at its pop pinnacle, but it also works very well with jazz singers and instrumentalists, the first being Paul Whiteman and his Orchestra, with a vocal performance from Bob Lawrence. Other early covers of the song include that of the Tommy Dorsey orchestra, who released their contemporary version in 1938, with His Master's Voice. During the mid-to-late 1930s Larry Adler and Henry Hall recorded live radio performances of the song on BBC Radio broadcasts. Art Tatum performed "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" in the 1930s, contributing to the song's popularity. However, it is unclear whether Tatum recorded the song during that decade.

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Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers - Roberta, 1935

 

In 1941 the Benny Goodman Orchestra first performed the song during recorded radio performances with Helen Forrest, then began performing the song with her replacement Peggy Lee. Glenn Miller conducted his rendition of the song at Abbey Road Studios in 1944. Owing to his sudden death later that year, his orchestral version of the song was not released until 1995. On October 30, 1946 Nat "King" Cole recorded the song, with Oscar Moore playing guitar and Johnny Miller playing bass as the King Cole Trio.

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Irene Dunne

 

In 1950 Charlie Parker and Jo Stafford each released versions of the song on their respective albums, Bird at St. Nick's and Autumn in New York. Thelonious Monk released the song in 1954 on his album Monk. On his 1955 album Clifford Brown with Strings, Clifford Brown released a cover of the song. Dinah Washington released the song in 1956, on her album Dinah!. In 1958 Sarah Vaughan released her rendition on her album, No Count Sarah. In 1961 Cannonball Adderley released the song on his album African Waltz. Bandleader Ray Conniff first released his arrangement of the song in 1962, on his double album The Ray Conniff Hi-Fi Companion; it became one of the signature songs of his career.

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Kathryn Grayson

 

It was an odd song for 1959. But then it was an odd song for 1934. "Smoke Gets In Your Eyes" isn't one of those "timeless" ballads, like "It Had To Be You" or "My Funny Valentine". It sounded old even when it was new. Even 80 years ago, it didn't talk the way pop songs were meant to talk. Nevertheless, it lives on in all of its numerous versions as a wonderfully romantic song that sounds like falling in love itself.

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Sarah Vaughan sings Smoke Gets In Your Eyes

 

Smoke Gets In Your Eyes lyrics


They asked me how I knew
My true love was true
Oh, I of course replied
Something here inside cannot be denied

They said someday you'll find
All who love are blind
Oh, when your heart's on fire
You must realize
Smoke gets in your eyes

So I chaffed them and I gaily laughed
To think they could doubt my love
Yet today my love has fade away
I am without my love

Now laughing friends deride
Tears I can not hide
Oh, so I smile and say
When a lovely flame dies
Smoke gets in your eyes
Smoke gets in your eyes

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Smoke Gets In Your Eyes

 

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Pop and Misc. Notes Mon, 08 May 2017 20:57:30 +0000
Po Dikim Stepyam Zabaikalya (By the wild steppes of the Transbaikalia) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/21490-po-dikim-stepyam-zabaikalya-by-the-wild-steppes-of-the-transbaikalia.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/21490-po-dikim-stepyam-zabaikalya-by-the-wild-steppes-of-the-transbaikalia.html Po Dikim Stepyam Zabaikalya (By the wild steppes of the Transbaikalia)

The song “Po Dikim Stepyam Zabaikalya” was composed by convicts in Siberia. Siberia is an extensive geographical region, by the broadest definition is also known as North Asia. Siberia has been historically part of Russia since the 17th century. The territory of Siberia extends eastwards from the Ural Mountains to the watershed between the Pacific and Arctic drainage basins. Transbaikalia, or Dauria is a mountainous region to the east of or "beyond" Lake Baikal in Russia. Dauria, is derived from the ethnonym of the Daur people. It stretches for almost 1,000 km from north to south from the Patomskoye Plateau and North Baikal Plateau to the Russian border. The Transbaikal region covers more than 1,000 km from west to east from Baikal to the meridian of the confluence of the Shilka and Argun Rivers.

Po Dikim Stepyam Zabaikalya (Brodyaga)

“Po Dikim Stepyam Zabaikalya” is a Russian folk song. The song was known since 1880s, when it appeared and proliferated among prisoners of Siberian penitentiaries. In 1908 it was published under the title of "Brodyaga" (The Tramp), by the Swedish composer Wilhelm Harteveld, who had collected it in 1906, during a trip to Siberia.

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Wilhelm Harteveld

 

The words author was printed to be I. K. Kondratiev, an expert on songs and a Russian Empire writer, who published several studies on Russian songs. There are few data about his biography. Ivan Belousov states that Kondratyev was a member of Vasily Surikov’s circle. Both Belousov and Korney Chukovsky were highly critical of Kondratyev’s work. Kondratyev wrote a novel Saltychikha, stories, plays, poetry, translations. He also wrote the lyrics for the best known of these being “Charming Eyes.” He is also credited with the lyrics of the song “On the wild steppes of Transbaikalya”. His authorship can't be proven though, because the poem is not included in his last published volume of poems "Under the noise of the Oak Groves" (1898).

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I. K. Kondratiev

 

Siberia is and was rich in its nature and its natural resources. But the temperatures that can reach in winters to -60°C made the living conditions almost unbearable. The first Russian prison camp in Siberia arose at the end of the 17th century as the two double tsars, Ivan V and Peter I who reigned between 1682 en 1696, made a proclamation in which was captured that some death sentences could be put into community service. This prison labour would take place in a so-called Katorga, a remote penal camp with minimum facilities. Over the next 130 years about 1.2 million prisoners were sent to Siberia, where they were put to work in the mining, but also in agriculture, because during summers the temperature in Siberia can raise up to +30°C, or in logging. Others were required to help with the construction of new infrastructure, including the 2000 km-long Amur Cart Road and the Trans-Siberian Railway.

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Prisoners builiding the Ussuri Railroad

 

A large percentage of the political prisoners tried to escape from the camps. It was very hard to catch a runaway, but the chances were also real that the escaped prisoner would be drowned in the river, or frozen to death in the primeval forests. The passionate craving for freedom has been well described by Dostoyevski. “At the first song of the lark throughout all Siberia and Russia, men set out on the tramp; God’s creatures, if they can break their prison and escape into the woods.... They go vagabondising where they please, wherever life seems to them most agreeable and easy; they drink and eat what they can find; at night they sleep undisturbed and without a care in the woods or in a field;... saying good night only to the stars…”

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Brodyaga (Vagabond)

 

“Po dikim stepyam Zabaikalya” (Russian: По диким степям Забайкалья) also known as “Brodyaga” (Russian: Бродяга) says about an escaped prisoner, who crosses the Baikal and meets his family. The song was recorded at the beginning of the 20th century by Nadezhda Plevizkaya and Semion Sadovnikov. A recording of this song performed by Peter Leshchenko was published in 1940s in Bucharest. In 1946 the Soviet songstress Lidia Ruslanova recorded the song. It was also been performed by the Piatnizkiy Choir. The Polish singer Czesław Niemen included the song in his Russian album in 1973. Zhanna Bichevskaya recorded the song for her album in 1980.

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Peter Leshchenko

 

The song remains in the repertoire of various Russian artists. There are several versions, which differ slightly in words or expressions. Most musicians omit some verses. The following is the most common version. (The verses in italics are those most often omitted):

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Lake Baikal

 

По диким степям Забайкалья (Russian lyrics)

1
По диким степям Забайкалья,
Где золото роют в горах,
Бродяга, судьбу проклиная,
Тащился с сумой на плечах.

2
Идёт он густою тайгою,
Где пташки одни лишь поют,
Котел его сбоку тревожит,
Сухие коты ноги бьют.
3
На нем рубашонка худая,
И множество разных заплат,
Шапчонка на нем арестанта
И серый тюремный халат.

4
Бежал из тюрьмы тёмной ночью,
В тюрьме он за правду страдал.
Идти дальше нет уже мочи –
Пред ним расстилался Байкал.
5
Бродяга к Байкалу подходит,
Рыбацкую лодку берёт
И грустную песню заводит,
Про Родину что-то поёт.

6
"Оставил жену молодую
И малых оставил детей,
Теперь я иду наудачу,
Бог знает, увижусь ли с ней!"

7
Бродяга Байкал переехал,
Навстречу - родимая мать.
"Ах, здравствуй, ах, здравствуй, мамаша,
Здоров ли отец мой да брат?"
8
"Отец твой давно уж в могиле,
Землею сырою лежит,
А брат твой давно уж в Сибири,
Давно кандалами гремит".

9
"Пойдём же, пойдём, мой сыночек,
Пойдём же в курень наш родной,
Жена там по мужу скучает,
И плачут детишки гурьбой".	

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Zabaikayle, Uranium Mine

 

Transliteration

1
Po dikim stepyam Zabaikalya,
Gde zoloto royut v gorakh,
Brodyaga, sudbu proklinaya,
Tashilsya s sumoi na plechakh.

2
Idyot on gustoyu taigoyu,
Gde ptashki odni lish poyut,
Kotel ego sboku trevozhit,
Sukhie koty nogi byut
3
Na niom rubashonka khudaya,
I mnozhestvo rasnykh zaplat,
Shapchonka na nem arestsanta
И seryi tyuremnyi khalat.

4
Bezhal iz tyurmy tyomnoi nochyu,
V tyurme on za pravdu stradal.
Idti dalshe net uzhe mochi –
Pred nim rasstilalsya Baikal.
5
Brodyaga k Baikalu podkhodit,
Rybatzkuyu lodky beryot
I grustnuyu pesnyu zavodit
Pro Rodinu chto-to poyot.

6
"Оstavil zhenu moloduyu
I malykh ostavil detei,
Teper ya idu naudachu,
Bog znayet, uvizhus li s nei!"

7
Brodyaga Baikal pereyekhal,
Navstrechu - rodimaya mat.
"Аkh, zdravstvuy, аkh zdravstvuy, mamasha,
Zdorov li otets moi i brat?"
8
"Otets tvoi davno uzh v mogile
Zemlioyu syroyu lezhit
А brat tvoi davno uzh v Sibiri,
Davno kandalami gremit".

9
"Poidyom zhe, poidyom, moi synochek
Poidyom zhe kuren nash rodnoi
Zhena tam po muzhu skuchayet,
Plachut detishki gurboi".

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Zabaikayle

 

By the wild steppes of the Transbaikalia (English lyrics)

1
On the wild steppes of Transbaikalia,
Where people dig for gold in the mountains,
A vagrant, bemoaning his fate,
Is wandering with a bag on his back.

2
He walks through the thick taiga,
Where only a few birds sing,
He carries a tin can on his side,
His feet are strapped in dry skins.
3
He wears a worn-out shirt
And a lot of different patches.
The cap on his head is a convict’s cap
And he wears a grey convict’s uniform.

4
He escaped from prison during a dark night
Where he was imprisoned for defending the truth.
But he could not go any further
In front of him was Lake Baikal.
5
The vagrant walks to the shore
And climbs in to a fisherman's boat.
He starts to sing a sad song
Telling something about his native land.

6
"I left my wife when she was young
And left her with my small children,
Now I wander aimlessly,
God knows, whether I shall meet her again!"

7
He crosses the lake,
His mother comes to meet him.
”O my dear mother let me embrace you,
Are my father and my brother well?”
8
"Your father has been dead for a long time;
He now rests in the damp earth.
And your brother is serving his sentence,
Wearing chains, somewhere in Siberia."

9
"Let's go, let’s go, my son,
Let's go home to our house,
Where your wife misses her husband,
And all your little children are crying."

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Lake Baikal

 

 

 

 

 

Лидия Русланова По диким степям Забайкалья

Lidia Ruslanova – Po dikim stepyam Zabailayla

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Pop and Misc. Notes Fri, 21 Apr 2017 15:08:33 +0000
Brockes Passion (by Stölzel) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/3-classical/21402-brockes-passion-by-stoelzel.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/3-classical/21402-brockes-passion-by-stoelzel.html Brockes Passion (by Stölzel)

The Brockes-Passion can be considered the archetype of the German Passion oratorio. As such, it served as a model and source of inspiration for famous later masterpieces, enjoying uninterrupted popularity throughout the 18th century when no less than 11 composers, including Handel and Telemann, set it to music. The superb version by Reinhard Keiser fellow citizen of Brockes in Hamburg, is the first (1712). Four at that time known settings, by Keiser, Telemann, Händel and Mattheson, were performed over four evenings in 1719, 1722, 1723, and 1730.

Brockes Passion (by Stölzel)

The German poet, Barthold Heinrich Brockes, was an almost exact contemporary of J.S. Bach. He was born in Hamburg in 1680 and lived to 1747. Although we should call his specifically poetic works "minor", Brockes was an accomplished and influential figure in pre-Enlightenment Germany: he translated Alexander Pope and James Thomson's "Seasons". From a literary standpoint Brockes's most important and, indeed, voluminous work—nine sturdy volumes—is his “Irdisches Vergnugen in Gott” ( ''Earthly Contentment in God''). For many eighteenth-Century composers, however, the importance of Brockes as a writer lay in his Passion oratorio libretto, “Der fur die Sunden der Welt gemarterte und sterbende Jesus” ( ''Jesus martyred and dying for the wickedness of the world'').

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Barthold Heinrich Brockes

 

In Brockes' version of a passion, a tenor Evangelist narrates, in recitative passages, events from all four Gospels' accounts of Jesus' suffering and death. Persons of the Gospel story (Jesus, Peter, Pilate, etc.) have dialogue passages, also in recitative; a chorus sings passages depicting the declamation of crowds; and poetic texts, sometimes in the form of arias, sometimes that of chorales (hymn-like short choral pieces), reflect on the events. Some of the arias are for the persons of the Passion, Jesus himself, Peter, etc., but Mary the mother of Jesus, who does not appear in the Gospel accounts of the Passion, also has a singing part, and fictitious "characters", The Daughter of Zion, four solo Believing Souls, and A Chorus of Believing Souls, also observe and comment.

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Barthold Heinrich Brockes

 

Gottfried Heinrich Stölzel (1690-1749) was a prolific composer of stage works, oratorios, masses, cantatas, and various instrumental works, little of his output has survived ; for example, only 12 of his 85 known secular cantatas, and fragments from only 10 of his 442 sacred cantatas, are extant. At least 18 orchestral suites and over 90 vocal serenatas are completely lost. Part of this is due to the fact that his music quickly became unfashionable after his death.

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Gottfried Heinrich Stölzel

 

Although highly regarded prior to the Neapolitan conquest of north European opera, in modern times Stölzel was known until quite recently from a handful of works, primarily the aria "Bist du bei mir", often mistakenly attributed to J.S. Bach, and a concerto for six trumpets. Regarding "Bist du bei mir", there is nothing in the few other recorded works by Stölzel.

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Brockes-Passion, 1712

 

That the Brockes-Passion was able to survive is something that we owe to a fortunate series of circumstances. Stölzel sent a copy of the passion to Sonderhausen, presumably in 1735. After several performances at the court there (such as is indicated by the parts, some of which have come down to us in multiple copies), it was stored away with numerous other compositions by him in a container. The container ended up behind the organ, and soon nobody remembered that it was there. It was not until 1870 that the court organist Heinrich Frankenberger and the later Bach biographer Philipp Spitta rediscovered it. Another hundred years would go by before a musicologist would take a closer look at Stölzel. Fritz Hennenberg's dissertation of 1965 includes a catalogue of Stölzel's cantatas and makes some remarks about the passion.

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Gottfried Heinrich Stölzel

 

In 1996 Ludger Rémy undertook a closer examination of the sources and did some research into the background of the Gotha passion performances. After some 250 years the passion was performed again for the first time in 1997.

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Brockes-Passion, 1716

 

In the personal foreword to his recording of Stölzel's Brockes-Passion (CPO, 1998), Ludger Rémy writes: "When I read the first pages of the score manuscript from Sondershausen, I was overcome by all sorts of emotions and felt no little shock. Here was a work that had been lying dormant for over 250 years, and it had an inner strength and power to it that have continued to hold me under their spell ever since then. Incredible music...and after reading it I was a changed man.

Ever since then I hove regarded the Brockes Passion by Gottfried Heinrich Stölzel as one of the most moving and genuinely human pieces of music that I have ever performed or had the good fortune to hear, and I reckon Stölzel among the truly great masters of the Central German Baroque, one who is perhaps even superior to most other composers of those times in his effect on heart and soul. I believe that the helpless silence and perplexity of humanity in face of the unchangingness of existence has only rarely found such eloquent expression in music."

 

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Ludger Rémy

 

The conductor Ludger Rémy uses a first-rate period-instrument small ensemble, good chamber choir and a superb roster of vocal soloists; some of them are familiar from recordings of Bach's vocal works. Among them are soprano Dorothee Mields, with angelic voice and dramatic expression, the earthier and no-less impressive soprano Constanze Backes, the native-sounding strong-voiced counter-tenor Henning Voss, the tenors Knut Schoch (who sang the lion's share of tenor parts in Leusink's Bach cantata cycle) as the Evangelist, and Andreas Post in most of the arias, and the dignified, authoritative and reliable as ever Klaus Mertens (who sang all the bass parts in Koopman's Bach cantata cycle) as Jesus.

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Stölzel - Brockes-Passion, album

 

There is the only one recording of Stölzel's Brockes-Passion. Why has not any other conductor took upon himself recording this work since 1997 ?

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Rubens - The Crucified Christ

 

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Classical Notes Tue, 04 Apr 2017 21:21:38 +0000
I’ll Play The Blues For You http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/1-blues/21316-ill-play-the-blues-for-you.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/1-blues/21316-ill-play-the-blues-for-you.html I’ll Play The Blues For You

By 1970s, Albert King was releasing one album a year. His albums were steady sellers, consistently entering the US Billboard 200 and the US R&B Charts. Although Albert was most popular with blues fans, he’d also built up a following amongst rock fans. However, not many people had Albert King pegged as a soul singer, that is not until the release of his 1972 album ‘I’ll Play the Blues For You.’ This might not have happened if fate hadn’t intervene. Albert was in Stax’s Memphis studios, searching for a song to record for his forthcoming album. Someone, Albert can’t remember who, suggested a Jerry Beach penned track, “I’ll Play the Blues For You.” This was added to the other six tracks that Albert recorded for his ‘I’ll Play the Blues For You,’ his fifth studio album for Stax.

I’ll Play The Blues For You

Accompanying Albert King on ‘I’ll Play the Blues For You,’ were two different rhythm sections, The Bar-Kays and The Movement. Adding their inimitable sound were The Memphis Horns, who later, would play on so many Hi Records’ albums.

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Albert King

 

Jerry Marlon Beach was born in Oklahoma City on December 11, 1941, where his father was stationed with the U.S. Army. He was descended from pioneering families in Shelby County, Texas. Jerry graduated from Bossier High School in 1960, and he was already sitting in with local bands playing guitar and singing. By the mid-60s, he and Danny Harrelson were headlining local clubs as "Danny & Jerry". He was a fixture and favorite on the regional music scene for 56 years in several bands. He dedicated every Monday night for 30 years to hosting a Blues Jam every week. He also taught guitar lessons for many years.

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Jerry Beach

 

In 1972, the late Albert King recorded Jerry's "I'll Play the Blues For You", which became a #1 R&B hit and has been covered by many artists. Jerry was nominated for a Grammy for the song. [First recording by Geater Davis (1969)].

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I’ll Play the Blues For You, disc, 1972

 

When ‘I’ll Play the Blues For You’ was released in the autumn of 1972, it proved to be the most commercially successful album of Albert King’s career so far. Not only did it reach number 140 in the US Billboard 200, but reached number eleven in the US R&B Charts.

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I’ll Play the Blues For You, album, 1972

 

That lengthy title song is virtually King’s manifesto. With its spoken-word rap section and a creamy vocal, it’s just one of many highlights here. King had sung standards earlier in his career, and his voice wasn’t always that of a blues shouter, but a richly textured instrument. Naturally, King’s famous electric blues guitar – the guitar which has influenced legends like Jimi Hendrix and Eric Clapton – is out front all over this record, as it should be. The songwriting (from a variety of contributors) is taut, though, and King’s solos never feel self-indulgent.

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Albert King

 

“I’ll Play The Blues For You” is a great song that is a little more sophisticated than a lot of blues songs you’ll find. It doesn’t use a strict 12-bar format. In fact, the B section/turnaround/bridge is fairly unique. It’s a 6-5-4-5 sequence. But it’s a great line for soloing over.

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Joe Bonamassa plays ‘I’ll Play the Blues For You’

 

“I’ll Play the Blues for You,” produced and arranged for King by Allen Jones and Henry Bush, was a landmark. It provided King with a new signature song via the title track, as well as showcasing all sides of his musical prowess.

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Gary Moore plays ‘I’ll Play the Blues For You’

 

King influenced guitarists such Eric Clapton, Jerry Garcia and Stevie Ray Vaughan. Among a long list of accomplishments, King recorded a tribute album to Elvis Presley and even played with the great Steve Cropper as well as the Hi Records gang through the years. King died in 1992 of a massive heart attack.

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Albert King

 

I’ll Play The Blues For You lyrics


If you're down and out and you feel real hurt
Come on over to the place where I live
And all your loneliness I'll try to soothe
I'll play the blues for you

Don't be afraid come on in
You might run across some of your old friends

All your loneliness I gotta soothe
I'll play the blues for you

I got no big name and I ain't no big star
I play the blues for you on my guitar
All your loneliness I'll try to soothe
I 'll play the blues for you

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I’ll Play The Blues For You painted by David Gerald

 

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Blues Notes Sun, 19 Mar 2017 22:13:15 +0000
Mercy, Mercy, Mercy http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/25-jazz/21214-mercy-mercy-mercy.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/25-jazz/21214-mercy-mercy-mercy.html Mercy, Mercy, Mercy

By the early 1960s hard bop was proudly displaying its affinity with R&B. At the forefront of the "soul jazz" movement was Cannonball Adderley, a dynamic alto saxophonist who made his reputation playing alongside John Coltrane in Miles Davis's extraordinary bands of the late 1950s. He played with Miles Davis as a sideman, including the ‘Kind of Blue’ album. After he left Miles Davis, Cannonball started his own successful quintet. Cannonball viewed himself as a jazz educator, always trying to teach people about jazz and bringing younger players in his band.

Mercy, Mercy, Mercy

One of those young players was Joe Zawinul, who later headed one of the greatest fusion bands ever, Weather Report. While in Cannonball's band, Joe wrote “Mercy, Mercy, Mercy.”

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Cannonball Adderley

 

Cannonball formed his own quintet with brother Nat in 1959 and subsequently won over audiences with such successful soul-jazz crossover recordings as 1960's ‘Dem Dirty Blues’ and 1961's ‘Nancy Wilson and Cannonball Adderley.’ The Adderley brothers (Cannonball on alto and Nat on cornet) were real pioneers in developing soul jazz; their quintet was incorporating soul sounds into its style back in the 1950s. Joining the Adderleys are Zawinul alternately on piano and electric piano, Victor Gaskin on bass, and Roy McCurdy on drums.

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Cannonball & Nat Adderley

 

The tune “Mercy, Mercy, Mercy,” was written by Joe Zawinul in 1966, and was recorded on Cannonball Adderley’s album “Mercy, Mercy, Mercy! ‘Live at The Club’.” “The Club” was the former Club DeLisa on the South Side of Chicago, whose owner, E. Rodney Jones, was a friend of Adderley’s and got Adderley to go along with a clever bit of marketing for his venue. Jones wrote the liner notes to the album and spun a nice tale about how Capitol Records set up its equipment in his club one night and it just happened to be the night when Adderley’s band was in such incredible form that they decided to make an album out of it. In reality, the album was recorded at Capitol’s studio in Hollywood with an audience invited in to provide the “live” feel. Legend has it that the electric piano Zawinul used to record “Mercy, Mercy, Mercy” was previously used by Ray Charles.

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Chicago, Club De Lisa, 1954

 

The song was a surprise commercial success, reaching No.2 on the Soul chart and No. 11 on the Billboard Hot 100 charts in 1967. “Mercy, Mercy, Mercy” is not a blues, although it is given that sense by Zawinul’s particularly inventive chord progression. Harmony of the tune has a strong Blues and Gospel sound. The chord progression oscillates between Bb and Eb, which is the four chord in the key of Bb, for the first 15 bars. The lack of much harmonic change, allows the soloist to explore a wide array of scale choices. Initially, try improvising on the tones of the major pentatonic scale (1-2-3-5-6); these are the tones of the melody in a different order. The next area to explore is the Blues scale (Bb-Db-Eb-E-F-Ab). Using a combination of these two choices will work well. The previously mentioned scales are just two of many choices. The final 5 bars start by going up to the five chord (similar to a Blues), then travels to the two chord, the three chord and lastly six to five, before returning to the top of the form. All the chords in the last five bars are contained within the key of Bb.

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Mercy, Mercy, Mercy! ‘Live at The Club’

 

"Mercy Mercy Mercy" is a great tune. In February of 1967, Johnny “Guitar” Watson & Larry Williams wrote lyrics to “Mercy, Mercy, Mercy,” scoring a hit on the R & B charts. The Buckinghams recorded the tune in August of 1967, which climbed to #5 on the pop charts. The Mauds also recorded the song the same year with lyrics by Curtis Mayfield, but the release of this version was somewhat overshadowed by the success of The Buckinghams’ cover.

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The Buckinghams, single, 23 June 1967

 

Originally from Vienna, Zawinul was a pioneer in the jazz fusion genre and known for incorporating electric keyboards and synthesizers in his interweaving of jazz, rock and world music elements.

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Joe Zawinul

 

The Buckinghams - "Mercy Mercy Mercy", lyrics


My baby she may not a-look
Like one of those bunnies out of a Playboy Club
But she got somethin' much greater than gold
Crazy 'bout that girl 'cause she got so much soul

I said she got the kind of lovin'
Kissin' and a-huggin'
Sure is mellow
Glad that I'm her fellow and I know
That she knocks me off my feet
Have mercy on me
'Cause she knocks me off my feet
There is no girl in the whole world
That can love me like you do

My baby when she walks by
All the fellows go, ooooooo, and I know why
It's simply 'cause that girl she looks so fine
And if she ever leaves me
I would lose my mind

She got the kind of lovin'
Kissin' and a-huggin'
Sure is mellow
Glad that I'm her fellow and I know
That she knocks me off my feet
Have mercy on me
'Cause she knocks me off my feet, hey
There is no girl in the whole world
That can love me like you do

Yeah, everybody in the neighborhood
Will testify that my girl she looks so good
And she's so fine
She'd give eyesight to the blind
And if she ever leaves me I would lose my mind

She got the kind of lovin'
Kissin' and a-huggin'
Sure is mellow
Glad that I'm her fellow and I know
That she knocks me off my feet
Have mercy on me
'Cause she knocks me off my feet
There is no girl in the whole world
That can love me like you do

Baby, yeah, you got that soulful feel
Yeah, it's all right
Mercy, mercy

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Cannonball Adderley Quintet

 

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Jazz Notes Wed, 01 Mar 2017 23:19:44 +0000
J’Attendrai (Tornerai) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/27-latin/21142-jattendrai-tornerai.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/27-latin/21142-jattendrai-tornerai.html J’Attendrai (Tornerai)

One of the most wonderful songs is the French song “J’attendrai”. Translated, it means “I Will Wait”. It’s a beautiful song about waiting for a loved one to return. Recorded in 1938 (in French) by an singer called Rina Ketty, it became hugely popular at the time and later came to represent the start of the Second World War. It became a counterpart to Lale Andersen's “Lili Marleen” in Germany and Vera Lynn's “We'll Meet Again in Britain.”

J’Attendrai (Tornerai)

Rina Ketty (1911 - 1996), whose real name was Cesarina Picchetto, was an Italian singer. She went to Paris in the 30s. In 1938 and 1939, she made her breakthrough with songs like “Sombreros et mantilles” and “J'attendrai.” Despite the popularity of these Chansons during World War II, she was not able to stay in the spotlights after 1945. In 1954 she moved to Canada and in 1965 she returned to France but was unable to revive her pre-war success.

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Rina Ketty

 

Rina Ketty's Italian accent highlighting the French text of the song, worked wonderfully on the radio of those days, but also on various subsequent recorded versions. Her version was followed the same year by one of Belgian chanteuse Anne Clercy, and both Tino Rossi and Jean Sablon recorded it in 1939. When France was occupied in 1940, it quickly became the big war song, with the love song's title being interpreted as meaning waiting for peace and/or liberation.

 

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Rina Ketty - J'attendrai, 1938

 

"J'attendrai" is actually a French version of the Italian song "Tornerai" (Italian for "You Will Return") composed by Dino Olivieri (music) and Nino Rastelli (lyrics). ‘Tornerai’ is the title of a piece of light music written in 1936. Dino Olivieri was born on December 5, 1905 in Senigallia, Marche, Italy. He died on January 24, 1963 in Milan, Lombardy, Italy. Nino Rastelli was born on January 1, 1913, Milano and died on October 4, 1962, Rome. French lyric written by Louis Poterat, was really an adaptation whilst keeping the sentiment of the original lyric.

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Nino Rastelli

 

"Tornerai" was first recorded in 1937 by both Carlo Buti and Trio Lescano (accompanied by the Italian jazz quartet Quartetto Jazz Funaro), and become a huge hit in Italy. Carlo Buti (Florence, 1902 - Montelupo Fiorentino, 1963) was an Italian singer known as "the Golden Voice of Italy." He retired in 1956 after having recorded 1574 songs. At the time, he was the most recorded voice in Italian music history. His unique warm and melodic "tenorino" style of high quasi-falsetto phrasing sung in the "mezza voce" made him an international success.

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Carlo Buti

 

Trio Lescano was a vocal trio singing close harmony. The trio became extremely popular in Italy in the 1930s and 1940s. The trio was an Italian version of American groups such as the Boswell Sisters, the Andrews Sisters and was formed by three Dutch sisters whose names were italianized into Alessandra, Giuditta and Caterinetta Lescano. Directed by maestro Carlo Prato and thanks to the radio, they became immediately so famous that even Benito Mussolini, passing by their balcony one day, recognized them and stopped to greet them.

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Trio Lescano

 

Dino Olivieri, composer and conductor, said to be inspired from the ‘Humming Chorus’ of Puccini's Opera "Madame Butterfly". The ‘Coro a bocca chius’ (‘Humming Chorus) has become one of the most famous of opera excerpts. What makes this three-minute chorus so enchanting? There’s its musical beauty, but also its sense of calm, such a contrast to the passion of Cio-Cio-San (Butterfly). This melody, a rare example of an operatic vocalise (wordless song), is doubled by solo viola d’amore – an archaic instrument with a distinct sound, used only this once in the opera.

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Dino Olivieri

 

The French version of this Italian song became so well known across Europe that it was often called "J'attendrai" even when recorded instrumentally, such the two versions recorded by Django Reinhardt and Stéphane Grappelli in 1938, or referred to as the original source when sung in other languages. An extremely popular version was recorded by Dalida for her 1975 album J'attendrai.

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Dalida - J'Attendrai, album

 

Tornerai lyrics


Tornerai da me, perchè l'unico sogno sei nel mio cuore
Tornerai, tu perché senza i tuoi baci languidi, non vivrò
Passa il tempo e tu, dove sei, con chi sei, tu non pensi a noi
Ma io so che da me, tornerai.

Tornerai da me, perchè l'unico sogno sei nel mio cuore
Tornerai, tu perché senza i tuoi baci languidi, non vivrò
Passa il tempo e tu, dove sei, con chi sei, tu non pensi a noi
Ma io so che da me, tornerai

La notte e i giorni, tu non ci sei, vicino a me
Coi sogni miei, dimmi quand'è che tornerai

Tornerai da me, perchè l'unico sogno sei nel mio cuore
Tornerai, tu perché senza i tuoi baci languidi, non vivrò
Passa il tempo e tu, dove sei, con chi sei, tu non pensi a noi
Ma io so che da me, tornerai, ma io so che da me, tornerai.

Passa il tempo e tu, dove sei, con chi sei, tu non pensi a noi
Ma io so che da me, tornerai.

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Carlo Buti - Tornerai, 1937

 

J'attendrai lyrics


J'attendrai
Le jour et la nuit, j'attendrai toujours
Ton retour
J'attendrai
Car l'oiseau qui s'enfuit vient chercher l'oubli
Dans son nid
Le temps passe et court
En battant tristement
Dans mon cœur si lourd
Et pourtant, j'attendrai
Ton retour

Les fleurs palissent
Le feu s'éteint
L'ombre se glisse
Dans le jardin
L'horloge tisse
Des sons très las
Je crois entendre ton pas
Le vent m'apporte
Des bruits lointains
Guettant ma porte
J'écoute en vain
Helas, plus rien
Plus rien ne vient

J'attendrai
Le jour et la nuit, j'attendrai toujours
Ton retour
J'attendrai
Car l'oiseau qui s'enfuit vient chercher l'oubli
Dans son nid
Le temps passe et court
En battant tristement
Dans mon cœur si lourd
Et pourtant, j'attendrai
Ton retour

Reviens bien vite
Les jours sont froids
Et sans limite
Les nuits sans toi
Quand on se quitte
On n'oublie tout
Mais revenir est si doux
Si ma tristesse
Peut t'émouvoir
Avec tendresse
Reviens un soir
Et dans tes bras
Tout renaîtra

Le temps passe et court
En battant tristement
Dans mon cœur si lourd
Et pourtant, j'attendrai
Ton retour

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Tino Rossi - J'attendrai, 1939

 

 

Giacomo Puccini:

Madama Butterfly - Humming Chorus

 

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Latin French, Italian Notes Wed, 15 Feb 2017 21:51:50 +0000
Save the Last Dance for Me http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/21071-save-the-last-dance-for-me.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/21071-save-the-last-dance-for-me.html Save the Last Dance for Me

“Save the Last Dance for Me” by the Drifters was a joint enterprise by the two greatest songwriting teams of the early rock era: it was written by Pomus and Shuman, and produced by Lieber and Stoller. No wonder it was a massive hit in 1960 in the US and UK. And it certainly didn't hurt having Ben E King – later most famous for ”Stand By Me” – singing lead. The Drifters had already used strings on their records, most famously on “There Goes My Baby,” the first fully-orchestrated rock hit, but not like this – the soaring, swirling violins underline the yearning in King's gravelly, sad, yet sweeping vocals.

Save the Last Dance for Me

One night, Pomus found a wedding invitation in a hatbox, and back came his most vivid memory from his wedding: watching his brother Raoul dance with his new wife while Doc, who had polio, sat in his wheelchair. His wife, Willi Burke, however, was a Broadway actress and dancer. Inspired, he stayed up all night writing the words to this song on the back of the invitation. The song gives his perspective of telling his wife to have fun dancing, but reminds her who will be taking her home and "in whose arms you're gonna be."

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Willi Burke and Doc Pomus Wedding

 

Mort Shuman had played him a soaring Latin melody that afternoon, and he wanted the words to sound like a poem translated into English - something along the lines of Pablo Neruda. By the second verse, a hint of jealousy and vulnerability creeps in with the lyrics, "If he asks if you're all alone, can he take you home, you must tell him no." Pomus ended his night of songwriting by writing down the words that would become the title: "Save The Last Dance For Me."

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Save The Last Dance For Me, single 1960

 

Together, Pomus and Shuman wrote the words and music to such hits as "Little Sister," "Suspicion," "Can't Get Used to Losing You," "Surrender," "Viva Las Vegas," and many more. After securing their own office in the Brill Building, the team continued to crank out hit after hit; Presley alone ended up recording more than 20 of their songs throughout his career, including items like "Mess of Blues." In addition, Pomus and Shuman also wrote songs for Fabian ("Turn Me Loose" and "I'm a Man"), Bobby Darin ("Plain Jane") and Dion, for whom they wrote "Teenager in Love."

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Mort Shuman and Doc Pomus

 

Perhaps no group in the history of Rock is more protean than The Drifters. Founded in 1953 by the late, great Clyde McPhatter as a Rhythm’n’Blues outfit, they quickly changed personnel and style to become a bunch of Doo-Woppers, before metamorphosing once again to appeal to the Rock’n’Roll market. A complicated set of circumstances put Benjamin Nelson, aka Ben E. King, in the lead spot of The Drifters, a group that started many years earlier. All the former personnel were fired and a new lineup emerged from the old Five Crowns with King as lead tenor. Leiber and Stoller produced the session that gave us this classic beauty - complete with a full-blown orchestra, previously unheard of in rock 'n' roll.

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The Drifters, Ben E King left

 

But there is a melancholy undertone – the girl in the song is a flirt and the singer is begging her to be faithful to him at the last. But he doesn't sound too hopeful. The tune, the vocals, the narrative, the arrangement – all are perfect. It is the perfect pop song.

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Lieber and Stoller

 

When Rolling Stone compiled the votes of nearly 200 music-industry heavyweights to create its 2004 list of the “500 Greatest Songs Of All Time,” The Drifters’ 1960 R&B ballad “Save The Last Dance For Me” secured spot #182. In the accompanying commentary, the magazine asserted the song “made the end of the party sound like the essence of true romance.”

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“Save The Last Dance For Me” was the only number-one hit for The Drifters—even “Under The Boardwalk” only reached number four—and to this day, it’s a mainstay on wedding playlists. But in the harsh reality of life off the dance floor, lyricist Pomus and his dancing bride Burke divorced about five years after “Save the Last Dance For Me” sashayed to the top of the charts. Perhaps they should have seen it coming.

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Save The Last Dance For Me, lyrics


You can dance every dance with the guy who gives you the eye
Let him hold you tight

You can smile every smile for the man who held your hand
'Neath the pale moonlight

Chorus: But Don't forget who's taking you home
And in whose arms you're gonna be
So darling, save the last dance for me

Oh I know that the music is fine like sparkling wine
Go and have your fun

Laugh and sing but while we're apart
Don't give your heart to anyone

Chorus: But Don't forget who's taking you home
And in whose arms you're gonna be
So darling, save the last dance for me

Baby don't you know I love you so
Can't you feel it when we touch
I will never never let you go
I love you oh so much

You can dance, go and carry on
Till the night is gone and it's time to go

If he asks if you're all alone can he take you home
You must tell him no

Chorus: Cause Don't forget who's taking you home
And in whose arms you're gonna be
So darling, save the last dance for me

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Last Dance, Painted by Amanda Jackson

 

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Pop and Misc. Notes Wed, 01 Feb 2017 22:24:34 +0000
Largo Al Factotum from The Barber of Seville http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/3-classical/20995-largo-al-factotum-from-the-barber-of-seville.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/3-classical/20995-largo-al-factotum-from-the-barber-of-seville.html Largo Al Factotum from The Barber of Seville

Young Count Almaviva is in love with Rosina, ward of the cantankerous Dr. Bartolo. With the help of some local musicians, he serenades her outside her balcony window (“Ecco ridente”), but she does not appear. Despairing, he dismisses the band. Just as they disperse, he hears someone approaching and hides. It is Figaro, barber and factotum extraordinaire, who will take on any job as long as he is well paid (“Largo al factotum”). Having recognized Figaro, Almaviva emerges from hiding and lays out his problem. The Count is in luck, for Figaro is frequently employed in Bartolo’s house as barber, wigmaker, surgeon, pharmacist, herbalist, veterinarian—in short, as jack-of-all-trades.

Largo Al Factotum

Rossini was composing an opera based on the first play of Beaumarchais famous trilogy of plays: Le Barbier de Séville, Le Marriage de Figaro, and La Mère Coupable. Twenty years earlier, Mozart had composed his opera The Marriage of Figaro, and comparisons between ‘Barber’ and ‘Figaro’ continue to this day. Furthermore, there was an earlier “Barbiere de Siviglia”,composed by Giovanni Paisello in 1776.

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Beaumarchais - Le Barbier de Séville, 1776

 

Like many great composers, Gioachino Rossini demonstrated musical genius at a young age. His first opera was produced when he was only 18. His first big hit was “Tancredi” in 1813 when he was 21, followed by ‘Barber’ at age 23. Quite possibly that “The Barber of Seville” was the fastest opera ever written. It is said that Rossini composed ‘Barber’ in 13 days. In any case, as it was commissioned by Duke Cesarini, the impresario of the Teatro Argentina, on December 26, 1815, it had to have been written between that day and its première on February 5, 1816, only 40 days later.

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Young Gioachino Rossini

 

Everybody know Rossini’s aria. Figaro is one of the most widely recognized opera characters and his aria “ Largo al factotum” has, no doubt, been the aria used most in cartoons. For some people, their one and only opera reference may come from this aria!

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Largo al factotum, score

 

Factotum - an employee who does all kinds of work. Figaro, in’Largo al factotum del città’ (Make way for the factotum of the city), explains his ability to do everything for everybody in the opera, if not in the entire city of Seville.

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Tito Gobbi - Largo al factotum

 

Typically, Figaro sings this aria alone onstage at the first entrance of the title character; the repeated "Figaro"s before the final patter section. Due to the constant singing of triplets in 6/8 meter at an allegro vivace tempo, the piece is often noted as one of the most difficult baritone arias to perform. This, along with the tongue-twisting nature of some of the lines, insisting on Italian superlatives (always ending in "-issimo"), have made it a pièce de résistance in which a skilled baritone has the chance to highlight all of his qualities.

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Mario del Monaco - Largo al factotum

 

“The Barber of Seville” is almost 200 years old but is perpetually young. “Largo al factotum” is so familiar that it’s hard to imagine how new and different from anything before it must have seemed to audiences in the second decade of the 19th century.

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Gioachino Rossini

 

Largo al factotum (Italian)


Largo al factotum della città.
Presto a bottega che l'alba è già.
Ah, che bel vivere, che bel piacere
per un barbiere di qualità! di qualità!
	
Ah, bravo Figaro!
Bravo, bravissimo!
Fortunatissimo per verità!

Pronto a far tutto,
la notte e il giorno
sempre d'intorno in giro sta.
Miglior cuccagna per un barbiere,
vita più nobile, no, non si da.
	
Rasori e pettini
lancette e forbici,
al mio comando
tutto qui sta.
V'è la risorsa,
poi, del mestiere
colla donnetta... col cavaliere...
	
Tutti mi chiedono, tutti mi vogliono,
donne, ragazzi, vecchi, fanciulle:
Qua la parrucca... Presto la barba...
Qua la sanguigna...
Presto il biglietto...
Qua la parrucca, presto la barba,
Presto il biglietto, ehi!
	
Figaro! Figaro! Figaro!, ecc.
Ahimè, che furia!
Ahimè, che folla!
Uno alla volta, per carità!
Ehi, Figaro! Son qua.
Figaro qua, Figaro là,
Figaro su, Figaro giù.
	
Pronto prontissimo son come il fulmine:
sono il factotum della città.
Ah, bravo Figaro! Bravo, bravissimo;
a te fortuna non mancherà.

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Placido Domingo - Largo al factotum

 

Largo al factotum (English translation)


Make way for the factotum of the city,
Hurrying to his shop for it's already dawn.
Ah, what a fine life, what fine pleasure
For a barber of quality!

Ah, bravo Figaro!
Bravo, bravissimo!
Most fortunate indeed!

Ready to do everything
Night and day,
Always on the move.
A cushier fate for a barber,
A more noble life, is not to be had.

Razors and combs,
Lancets and scissors,
At my command
Everything's there.
Here are the tools
Of my trade
With the ladies...with the gentlemen...

Everyone asks for me, everyone wants me,
Ladies, young lads, old men, young girls:
Here is the wig... The beard is ready...
Here are the leeches...
The note is ready...
Here is the wig, the beard is ready,
The note is ready, hey!

Figaro! Figaro! Figaro!, etc.
Dear me, what frenzy!
Dear me, what a crowd!
One at a time, for pity's sake!
Hey, Figaro! I'm here.
Figaro here, Figaro there,
Figaro up, Figaro down.

Swifter and swifter, I'm like a thunderbolt:
I'm the factotum of the city.
Ah, bravo Figaro! Bravo, bravissimo,
You'll never lack for luck!

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Gioachino Rossini

 

 

Largo Al Factotum from The Barber of Seville (Andre Rieu)

 

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Classical Notes Tue, 17 Jan 2017 14:42:20 +0000
Midnight Blues (Snowy White and Gary Moore too) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/1-blues/20900-midnight-blues-snowy-white-and-gary-moore-too.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/1-blues/20900-midnight-blues-snowy-white-and-gary-moore-too.html Midnight Blues (Snowy White and Gary Moore too)

In June 1990 Roger Waters, having split from the Pink Floyd, asked Snowy White to perform with him on the spectacular ‘The Wall’ show in Berlin. White can be seen in the documentary Roger Waters: The Wall. His blonde hair is easily recognizable, as is his gold Les Paul. “It’s quite interesting, because they must have filmed thousands of hours backstage, every show – for months, years. It was a well-oiled machine, and never difficult at all. Even if it wasn’t mine, it was a pleasure playing that really great music.” In 1991 Waters again called upon Snowy, this time to play at the ‘Guitar Legends’ concert in Seville as part of Expo. After this concert Snowy decided that it was time that he returned to the mainstream of things so he set about putting down songs that he had been writing during the previous few years.

Midnight Blues

What from his own catalog would he recommend to someone seeking samples of his quieter, bluesier side?

“There are a lot of things I think sound pretty good,” Snowy said. “But, one that seems very popular, with a lot of downloads on YouTube and comments, is ‘Midnight Blues.’ When I did my first album as The White Flames, I said, ‘To hell with the record companies, to hell with radio play. Forget all that, we’re just going to play for ourselves.’ And I’m really pleased with that song and the album No Faith Required.”

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Roger Waters & Snowy White, "The Wall"

 

Taken from the “No Faith Required” album, “Midnight Blues” sets a quiet mood which is interesting with all of the fire and brimstone of a massive rock show but draws the crowd through subtler means. John “Rabbit” Bundrick’s organ delivers a gospel-like quality well matched to White’s dry talk-singing style. When the impact is due Jeff Allen’s drums produce a thunderous roar as the sustained guitar notes soar above, touching down softly to a cathedral-esque atmosphere and a fading of sound into the swimming reverberation. A mainstay in White Flames Band sets since its inception, “Midnight Blues” manages to deliver on that late night smoky bar mood the title promises.

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Snowy White & The White Flames - No Faith Required

 

 

Spring 1989. Gary Moore was touring across Europe promoting his latest album ‘After The War,’ his fifth rock album for Virgin since 1982's ‘Corridors Of Power’. Sales and profile were growing with each album, culminating in ‘Wild Frontier’ in 1987. But Gary was tiring of the 1980s rock treadmill; the emphasis on soulless fret-melting guitar, big hair and looking serious in daft pop videos. He realised, too, that he was repeating himself as a songwriter. He needed to take some risks if he was to move on – but which way to turn?

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Gary Moore

 

Sitting in the tune-up room loosening up before a gig in Germany with his long-time bass player Bob Daisley , the answer came. “We were messing about playing bits and pieces of blues,” says Daisley. “Stuff from the Bluesbreakers’ Beano album. And then it came to me. I said to Gary, ‘Why don’t we do a blues album?’”

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Gary Moore - Midnight Blues

 

1990's “Still Got The Blues”album was an abrupt and risky game-changer that reignited the tradition of blistering British blues guitar. The album features two of the finest blues guitarists in the world, namely Albert King and Albert Collins, plus an appearance by George Harrison who wrote the song ‘That Kind Of Woman.’ The slow-uplifting motion of ‘Midnight Blues’ and the grounding grind of the Albert King tribute ‘King Of The Blues’ shows Moore playing at two ends of the blues spectrum and coping with it admirably.

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Gary Moore - Still Got The Blues

 

One thing’s for sure, Gary Moore was a worthy recipient of the most famous Les Paul on the planet. Unforeseen financial problems forced Moore to sell it. An American collector Melvyn Franks bought it, but the guitar has come home. Airey says he heard Joe Bonamassa play “Midnight Blues” on it at the Royal Albert Hall and he “just sat there and burst into tears”.

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Les Paul

 

The album had a broader impact, too. While the international white blues scene was dominated by British guitarists in the 1960s and 1970s; the likes of Stevie Ray Vaughan and Jeff Healey captured the territory in the 1980s. “Still Got The Blues” put British blues playing back on the map, inspired a new generation of guitar players and provided much of the repertoire for the UK pub blues scene of the 1990s.

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Joe Bonamassa at Royal Albert Hall

 

Snowy White - Midnight Blues lyrics


This is my blues
Cause I'm back then on my own again
This is the blues I'm playing

Yes it's the final thing
When the night is cold and lonely
This is the midnight blues

This is the midnight blues
For the girl I left behind me
Ain't it the final thing

This is the blues
Just a feeling deep inside of me
This is the midnight blues

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Snowy White

 

Gary Moore - Still Got The Blues lyrics


Used to be so easy
to give my heart away.
But I've found out the hard way
there's a price you have to pay.
I found out that love, is no friend of mine
I should've known time after time

So long
it was so long ago.
But I've still got the blues for you.

Use to be so easy
Fall in love again
But I found out the hard way, it's
a road that leads to pain.
I found out that love
was more than just a game
you play on to win
but you lose just the same.

So long
it was so long ago.
But I've still got the blues for you.

So many years since I've seen your face,
but You will in my heart
there's an empty space
where you used to be.

So long
it was so long ago.
But I've still got the blues for you.

Though the days come and go
There is one thing I know
I've still got the blues for you.

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Midnight Blues

 

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Blues Notes Fri, 30 Dec 2016 21:43:02 +0000