Latin, French, Italian The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/latin-french-italian/381.html Mon, 26 Oct 2020 02:19:07 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Putumayo Presents - Brasileiro (1999) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/latin-french-italian/381-putumajo/24365-putumayo-presents-brasileiro-1999.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/latin-french-italian/381-putumajo/24365-putumayo-presents-brasileiro-1999.html Putumayo Presents - Brasileiro (1999)

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1 	–Silvia Torres 	Take Saravá 	3:33
2 	–Celso Machado 	Despedida 	5:11
3 	–Nazaré Pereira 	Clarão De Lua 	2:00
4 	–João Bosco 	Vatapá 	3:25
5 	–Rosa Passos 	Aguas De Março 	2:56
6 	–Jorge Ben 	O Namorado Da Viuva 	2:02
7 	–Clara Nunes 	Canto Das Três Racas 	4:27
8 	–Chico César 	Mama África 	3:47
9 	–Zeca Baleiro 	Éssas Emoções! 	3:43
10 	–Martinho Da Vila 	Visgo De Jaca 	3:02
11 	–Beth Carvalho 	Dança De Solidão 	2:49
12 	–Chico Buarque 	Cantando No Toró 	2:46
13 	–Geraldo Azevedo 	Berekeré 	5:19

 

The great thing about Putumayo's world music compilations of the '90s was the label's tendency to make such unlikely choices. If a Putumayo compilation focused on Celtic music, many of the artists wouldn't be Irish or Scottish -- and if the focus was salsa, Putumayo wasn't about to limit itself to big stars out of Cuba and Puerto Rico. A collection of Brazilian pop that spans 1974-1999, Brasileiro isn't as much of a musical roller coaster as some might expect from Putumayo -- you would have expected the collection to aim for maximum diversity and jump from forro, lambada and tropicalismo to bossa nova and serteneja before spotlighting a rap group from Bahia. But while Brasileiro isn't as far-reaching as it could have been, it's enjoyable and satisfying. Anyone who's seriously into Brazilian pop should be familiar with Beth Carvalho, João Bosco, Jorge Ben, Chico Buarque, and the late Clara Nunes, but Putumayo also turns its attention to some artists who weren't huge names in Brazil when the compilation came out, including Zeca Baleiro, Chico César (whose "Mama Africa" combines Afro-Brazilian music with reggae) and Rosa Passos, who embraces the Portuguese lyrics to the Antonio Carlos Jobim standard, "Waters of March." ---Alex Henderson, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Putumayo Mon, 12 Nov 2018 13:45:24 +0000
Putumayo Presents - Brazilian Lounge (2006) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/latin-french-italian/381-putumajo/13011-putumayo-presents-brazilian-lounge-2006.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/latin-french-italian/381-putumajo/13011-putumayo-presents-brazilian-lounge-2006.html Putumayo Presents - Brazilian Lounge (2006)


1. Brigas Nunca Mais - Paula Morelenbaum
2. Meu Esquema - Mundo Livre
3. Ha Dias - Luca Mundaca
4. Previsao - Bossacucanova
5. Agua De Coco - Marcos Valle
6. Mariana - Bia
7. Parece Mentira - Katia B
8. E Depois... - Bid
9. August Day Song (Remixed By King Britt) - Bebel Gilberto
10. Como Vou Fazer (Remix) - Dois Irmaos
11. Os Grilos - Marcela
12. Saudade Fez Um Samba – Marissa

 

Putumayo's latest excursion into chill-out features twelve urbane tracks that, even at their most laid-back (and Brazilians have raised this state of being to an art form) are saturated with a languid, sweaty tropical ardor. Icy, metronome-like beats and electronica are powerless against a Carioca heat-wave, just as a cold Brahma cerveja (beer), while momentarily refreshing, cannot affect prevailing weather patterns. But the irrepressively creative mixmasters of São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro seem to revel in these very incongruities, frosting florid acoustic sounds and warmly human vocals with subtle yet transformative computer-generated wizardry. Notable tracks include "E Depois" by singer/actor Seu Jorge (City Of God, The Life Aquatic With Steve Zizzou) and emerging star Luca Mundaca's "Há Dias." In Bebel Gilberto's "August Day Song," romance is compared to a drenching downpour; her slightly nostalgic style often evokes that of her father, sixties icon, João Gilberto. Additional reasons to purchase the album -- the trilingual liner notes offer a recipe for the national caipirinha cocktail and a portion of profits from the CD will be donated to Rukha, an organization dedicated to rescuing Brazil's street children. ---Christina Roden, Editorial Reviews

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Putumayo Sat, 20 Oct 2012 18:39:37 +0000
Putumayo Presents Acoustic France (2008) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/latin-french-italian/381-putumajo/9009-putumayo-presents-acoustic-france-2008.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/latin-french-italian/381-putumajo/9009-putumayo-presents-acoustic-france-2008.html Putumayo Presents Acoustic France (2008)

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01. Les Escrocs - Assedic (4:25)
02. Thomas Dutronc - J'Suis Pas D'Ici (2:09)
03. Sandrine Kiberlain - Le Quotidien (2:57)
04. Pascal Lejeune - Bilingue In Paris (3:13)
05. JP Nataf - Mon Ami D'en Haut (3:44)
06. Constance Amiot - Clash Dans Le Tempo (2:49)
07. Gordon Sanchez - Les Aleas De L'Hiver (2:35) play
08. Carla Bruni - Raphael (2:26)
09. Rose - Sombre Con (3:33)
10. Gerard Pitiot - Couplet De La Rue De Bagnolet (2:27)
11. Romane - Passion (2:22) play
12. Rupa & The April Fishes - Maintenant (4:11)

 

Putumayo found itself with a hit when it released an album of French café music, so the next logical step is of course to add an entry to their acoustic line with a French entry. French café music itself is heavy with acoustic formats, chanson and gypsy jazz high in its formats. Here those are thoroughly represented, along with some more modern elements in the singer/songwriter vein. The album opens with a fairly Brazilian piece courtesy of Les Escrocs, fitting sociopolitical outrage into a relaxed acoustic format surprisingly well. Thomas Dutronc stutters out a nice bit of gypsy jazz, keeping accompaniment on guitar himself. Actress Sandrine Kiberlain contributes a piece of striking pop, and New Brunswick native Pascal Lejeune creates a bit of classic French café culture that could just as easily have come from Brassens or Gainsbourg. J.P. Nataf invokes elements of the Beatles in a more folk-infused ballad, Parisian (by way of Le Cote d'Ivoire and Maryland) Constance Amiot provides what may be the highlight of the album in a heartfelt but fairly complex piece of contemporary singer/songwriter goodness, and the short-lived group Gordon Sanchez contributes a worthwhile piece. Carla Bruni adds in a breathy, seductive, chanson ballad pre-Sarkozy (and indeed dedicated to a previous lover) that could almost have come from a Francophone Jewel in its vocal delivery. The delivery of Rose is fairly forgettable amongst the rest of the album, especially given the impassioned delivery of Gérard Pitiot in what would seem to be a slightly modernized chanson. After another romp in the realm of gypsy jazz courtesy of Romane, this time with a heavier Spanish influence, the album ends on the decidedly multicultural Rupa & the April Fishes and a milonga in French that doesn't quite fit anywhere in the more restrained French music with its Argentinean pathos, but does end the album on a strong note. The French language lends itself well to acoustic music, and the selection of artists present on this compilation capitalizes on that marriage of aesthetics perfectly. An excellent primer in both contemporary French music and in more historic stylings, by way of their modern interpreters and standard bearers. ---Adam Greenberg, Rovi

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Putumayo Sat, 23 Apr 2011 19:16:54 +0000
Putumayo Presents Cafe Cubano (2008) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/latin-french-italian/381-putumajo/684-cafecunano.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/latin-french-italian/381-putumajo/684-cafecunano.html Putumayo Presents Cafe Cubano (2008)


1. José Conde y Ola Fresca • El Chacal 
2. Ignacio "Mazacote" Carrillo • Lágrimas Negras 
3. Pedro Luis Ferrer feat. Lena Ferrer • Ay, Mi Vidita 
4. René Ferrer • Como A Cada Manana 
5. La Orquesta Mágica De La Habana • Morenita 
6. Germán Obregón • Pincel Campesino 
7. Armando Garzón • Escándalo 
8. Asere • Corazón 
9. Félix Baloy • Después de esta Noche 
10. Kelvis Ochoa • Fué Una de Mambo

 

Moving along their trail of café music from around the world, Putumayo put together a compilation of relaxed, sentimental Cuban music that packs a pretty serious punch. There are a few heavy hitters on the album, but very few will have any name recognition outside of a few dedicated aficionados. After an opening track from Miami-based José Condé, Afro-Cuban All Star Ignacio Carrillo dusts off a beautiful old Miguel Matamoros number with a perfect tone. Pedro Luis Ferrer (now making a name on the world market) contributes a number, as does Rene Ferrer, with an outstandingly touching bit of nueva trova. After a quick Buena Vista-style piece featuring Adriano Rodriguez, German Obregón contributes a lilting guajira, with its characteristic string work. Armando Garzón's bolero evokes the nightclub exoticism of the 1950s, the younger Asere contribute a mix of bolero and son, and one more bolero in the vein of a Beny Moré track brings the album up to the end of the classic stylings. To finish off the rounds, Kelvis Ochoa presents something more in the realm of the singer/songwriter style gaining ground in Cuba bit by bit. It's a completely relaxed album, and a completely relaxing one, with outstanding musical quality throughout. This isn't the Buena Vista Social Club sound that many may be expecting from a compilation of Cuban music -- there is very little son, and essentially no rhumba. Just plenty of soul. ---Adam Greenberg, Rovi

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Putumayo Thu, 15 Oct 2009 13:55:57 +0000
Putumayo Presents French Cafe (2003) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/latin-french-italian/381-putumajo/9096-putumayo-presents-french-cafe-2003.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/latin-french-italian/381-putumajo/9096-putumayo-presents-french-cafe-2003.html Putumayo Presents French Cafe (2003)

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1. Fibre De Verre - Paris Combo
2. Marilou Sous La Neige - Serge Gainsbourg
3. Si La Photo Est Bonne - Barbara			play
4. Juste Quelau'un De Bien - Enso Enso
5. Je M'Suis Fait Tout Petit - Georges Brassens
6. Elaeudanla Teiteia - Jane Birkin
7. La Mer Opale - Coralie Clement
8. Ondule - Mathieu Boogaerts
9. Un Jour Comme Un Autre - Brigitte Bardot	play
10. On N'a Pas Besoin - Paris Combo
11. Mal O Mains - Sanseverino
12. En Douce - Baguette Quartette
13. La Fee Clochette – Polo

 

Although far from definitive (no Edith Piaf in sight!), this enchanting compilation delivers a perfect aural snapshot of what spending a late summer afternoon in a French cafe actually feels like. The supreme elegance and understated approach that lie at the core of these 13 tracks will delight fans of sophisticated pop. As is the case with previous Putumayo releases, the sequencing is seamless, combining the endearingly old-fashioned flavor of George Brassens with the iconoclastic romanticism of George Gainsbourg and the sultry whispers of a youthful Brigitte Bardot. Better yet, the disc spends some valuable time introducing listeners to a new generation of French musicians who have embraced the traditional chanson format while incorporating fresh elements into the mix. Try the light-as-a-feather caress of female vocalist Enzo Enzo, the sweet playfulness of the electronica-informed Mathieu Boogaerts, and the irrepressible optimism of Paris Combo--a jazzy quintet that represents the French cafe ambiance at its cosmopolitan best. --Ernesto Fechner

 

Serge Gainsbourg (or Gainsbarre, as they call him in the Caribbean) is one of the creepiest musical perverts ever known. He's also one of France's great musical geniuses, so go figure. Putumayo had the guts to put him on the disc and the good taste to select a beautiful, melancholy, and touching song: "Marilou sous la neige".

How do you narrow down the brilliant Barbara to a single song? Everything about her was always just so: the right enunciation, hitting the notes perfectly, every hair in place, her make-up impeccable. Putumayo chose "Si la photo est bonne", and it fits right into the album without leaving me drooling for more (although more would be nice).

The collection is called "French Cafe", so you should have a pretty good idea what you're going to get. The question is, did Putumayo choose the tracks well? ABSOLUTELY. This is one of their real winners. It creates a perfect mood, laid-back and content, neither too melancholy nor too zealous.

Just the thing for cruising the Pacific Coast Highway through Laguna Beach, the sun and waves and palm trees and thirty dollar pizzas and rich ladies in high heels on the beach.

Or you might want to put it on while you houseclean, because it's not so brooding you'll collapse in tears among the cinders, but neither is it so vigorous you'll look like a overprogrammed robot. You'll just think: "Hell, why not vacuum in pearls?" ---Rebecca Whiting

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Putumayo Wed, 11 May 2011 08:35:13 +0000
Putumayo Presents Paris (2006) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/latin-french-italian/381-putumajo/9022-putumayo-presents-paris-2006.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/latin-french-italian/381-putumajo/9022-putumayo-presents-paris-2006.html Putumayo Presents Paris (2006)

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01. Thomas Fersen - Au Cafe de la Paix (4:02)
02. Coralie Clement - Samba de Mon Coeur Qui Bat (3:52)
03. Karpatt - Dites Moi Tu (4:26)
04. Carla Bruni - Quelqu'un M'a Dit (2:43) play
05. Pascal Parisot - Je Reste au Lit (3:53)
06. Keren Ann - Jardin d'Hiver (2:56)
07. Tryo - Serre-Moi (3:46)
08. Paris Combo - Lettre A P... (3:29)
09. Presque Oui - L'ongle (2:59) play
10. Amelie-Les-Crayons - Ta P'tite Flamme (3:52)
11. Myrtille - Les Pages (2:37)
12. Aldebert - Carpe Diem (3:31)

 

Following the successful French Café compilation, Putumayo here updates the French sound, but in a tricky way. The sound on this album is again chanson, the music of the French café culture. Now though, it's the core of la nouvelle scène instead: younger, more world-influenced artists performing chanson with their own touches and flair. The sound is an excellent one. While many of the males evoke Serge Gainsbourg and the females Edith Piaf to some degree, there's a contemporary feel. The samba is more prominent, with lilting acoustic guitars and the occasional homage to Astrud Gilberto. The sounds -- once epitomized by Georges Brassens -- are given a less folk-inspired feel in favor of a more urban one, but the emotions are similar. There's weariness, heartbreak, longing, and occasionally outright madness inherent in the lyrics and the emotive qualities of the vocals. While chanson is perhaps one of the best examples of a dated music (if one hears chanson, it's obviously in a period format, on a scratchy record, etc.), this compilation shows off what's new. While entirely deferential (and referential) to the old masters, there's just enough updating to create that contemporary aspect, but not so much as to destroy the simple pleasure of French café music. An excellent introduction to the field of French music at large, but especially chanson. ---Adam Greenberg, Rovi

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Putumayo Mon, 25 Apr 2011 18:34:18 +0000
Putumayo Presents: Afro-Latin Party (2005) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/latin-french-italian/381-putumajo/19793-putumayo-presents-afro-latin-party-2005.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/latin-french-italian/381-putumajo/19793-putumayo-presents-afro-latin-party-2005.html Putumayo Presents: Afro-Latin Party (2005)

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1. Betece - Africando
2. Ritmo Con Ache - Jose Mangual Jr.
3. Cuentame Que Te Paso - Pepe & The Bottle Blondes
4. Babalu - Ska Cubano
5. Mandali - Africando
6. Morenita - Cubismo
7. Demal - Africando
8. Cogele El Gusto - Chico Alvarez
9. La Grev' Bare Mwen - Ronald Rubinel's Salsa Kolor
10. Samba Luku Samba - Ricardo Lemvo

 

Croatian salsa, Cuban ska, and Oregonian mambo!?!? These are three of the unlikely gems listeners will find on Afro-Latin Party. What started out as an effort to provide the perfect soundtrack to a Latin dance party became a tribute to the global appreciation and realization of the musical ricochet between Cuba and Africa.

Central to the Afro-Latin phenomenon is Africando, who provide three songs on Afro-Latin Party, each with a different African lead singer. In the 1960s and 1970s, the biggest names in African music—including such heavyweights as Youssou N’Dour and Salif Keita—were performing Latin music, thanks to recordings that came over from abroad. Cultural exchange between Cuba and the socialist governments in Mali and other parts of West Africa was a regular phenomenon. Performers like the Fania All Stars and Celia Cruz toured Africa and became musical icons.

In 1992, legendary Africando founders Ibrahim Sylla and Boncana Maïga traveled to New York to record with top local salsa musicians, many who were taken by surprise by these Africans performing and their phonetically learned Spanish lyrics. Interestingly, many of the band members on the three Africando tracks here, also play on other tracks on Afro-Latin Party. ---Editorial Reviews, amazon.com

 

Putumayo Presents: Afro-Latin Party might give the idea of frantic, sweaty rhythms, and mambos and salsas at hyperspeed. Instead, this collection focuses more on the genre called son, with some low-key salsa and rumba thrown in for good measure. Africando, the superstar band made up of West African and Latin musicians, claims most of the honors, with three out of ten tracks, highlighting the transatlantic connection and the supreme sense of musicianship. The biggest surprise, however, is Cubismo, who might be from Croatia, but who create a very convincing Cuban sound on "Morenita." Ska Cubano bring a slight touch of ska to the proceedings on the campy "Babalu," while Ronald Rubinel's Salsa Kolor bring Caribbean color from Martinique. In other words, Cuban music doesn't just belong in Cuba any more, and Latin music can't be restricted to the Americas (although this compilation does mostly draw from there). It's all good, well-played stuff, and might get people dancing. But ultimately it seems that tracks have been chosen for functionality within the idea of the compilation rather than their own outstanding qualities (which is possibly fair enough), and end up slightly anonymous. ---Chris Nickson, Rovi

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Putumayo Mon, 30 May 2016 14:31:11 +0000
Putumayo Presents: Baila - A Latin Dance Party (2006) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/latin-french-italian/381-putumajo/19554-putumayo-presents-baila-a-latin-dance-party-2006.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/latin-french-italian/381-putumajo/19554-putumayo-presents-baila-a-latin-dance-party-2006.html Putumayo Presents: Baila - A Latin Dance Party (2006)

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1 	–Raul Paz 	Mua Mua Mua 	2:40
2 	–Africando All Stars 	Son Fo 	4:48
3 	–La-33 	Que Rico Boogaloo 	3:48
4 	–Gabriel Rios 	Bones Bugalú 	3:18
5 	–Spanish Harlem Orchestra 	Escucha El Ritmo 	5:50
6 	–Calle Real 	Hoah 	4:08
7 	–Ricardo Lemvo And Makina Loca 	Mama Kiyelele 	3:52
8 	–Los Pinguos 	Tierra Santa 	3:25
9 	–NG La Banda 	La Cachimba 	2:23
10 	–Yerba Buena 	El Burrito 	3:56
11 	–Brooklyn Funk Essentials 	Mambo Con Dancehall 	2:46

 

Putumayo's bread and butter lies in Latin releases, and as they get bigger they also seem to get better at picking out a proper variety that can meld together into a coherent compilation while still retaining the ideal of being particularly worldly. Here, they do it again with an omnipresent groove. The pieces here clump pretty closely around the Cuban styles, but the bands are as far flung as one would expect from Putumayo. The album opens with a slick number from Raul Paz, a Cuban living in Paris. Senegalese son follows quickly, performed flawlessly. Soon these are followed by a contemporary version of a boogaloo (with hints of Rob Thomas perhaps?), a proper old-school salsa, and some updated timba (from Sweden, no less). The first departure from straightforward Cuban sounds doesn't come until midway through the album, with the addition of a soukous motive mixed into a strong salsa from Ricardo Lemvo (and largely in Lingala!). Right after that though, the departures from Cuba becomes stronger, with los Pinguos, who slyly convert a bit of Argentine folk into reggae, and then into a more Cuban sound. The album finishes with a collection of more contemporary versions -- NG la Banda plays some more timba, Yerba Buena updates the New York sound a bit, and Brooklyn Funk Essentials incorporate whatever they like. It's a nice album overall. The parts don't always make sense separately, but they fit together stylistically into a journey of Cuban music paradoxically more separable into time frames than into geographical frames. ---Adam Greenberg, Rovi

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Putumayo Thu, 14 Apr 2016 15:55:21 +0000
Putumayo Presents: Islands (1997) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/latin-french-italian/381-putumajo/19757-putumayo-presents-islands-1997.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/latin-french-italian/381-putumajo/19757-putumayo-presents-islands-1997.html Putumayo Presents: Islands (1997)

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  1. Danca Ma Mi Criola - Tito Paris
  2. Me Ki Sa Oule - Kali
  3. Bomba Te Traigo Yo - Jose Gonzales Y Banda Criolla
  4. Falso Testemunho - Maria Alice
  5. Veinte Anos - Los Traditionales De Carlos Puebla
  6. Mbo Hahita Avao - D'Gary & Jihe
  7. Sonegaly - Tarika
  8. E Iti Taurua - Bobby & Angelo
  9. Olinda Road - Hapa
  10. Mix Up World - Quito Rymer

 

Why is it that island cultures so often create the most magical, deeply individual sounds? Is it because they are usually miles away from corrupting outside influences? Perhaps it is due to the fact that they are forced to create music from their own inner resources. The powerful voices of Jamaican reggae, Cuban rumba, and Puerto Rican salsa have been joined on the world stage by Cape Verdean morna and Hawaiian slack-key guitar, and the hits just keep on coming. The tunes on this set are not terribly revealing about their place of origin, but plenty of likable grooves turn up, primarily dance-oriented party fodder. It's like a casual tourist's piña colada-fueled vacation fantasy: a very pretty and colorful interlude that doesn't have much to do with real life in either place. It's perfect for lazy summer days and nights, ethnic banquets, and tropical-themed celebrations. ---Christina Roden, amazon.com

 

A relatively loosely fitting concept for an album, this one from Putumayo's shelves is filled with songs from artists who live on islands (e.g., Caribbean, Pacific, East African). The album starts out with a little dance from Tito Paris (from Cape Verde). Also representing Cape Verde later on is Maria Alice, who puts out something a little closer to Portuguese fado (understandable, given her location). Representing the Caribbean are Kali from Martinique, who provides a slickly produced dance number, Puerto Rico's Jose Gonzalez, who provides a little more of a hybrid dance/traditional sound, and Quito Rymer, a bar owner from the Virgin Islands, with a heavily reggae-tinged sound. From Madagascar, both D'Gary & Jihe (legends in their own land) and Tarika (apparently without her constant associate, Sammy) provide tracks. Finally, from the Pacific, a pair of similar duos provide tracks: Bobby & Angelo from Tahiti and Hapa from Hawaii, both of whom have created something of a half-traditional popular form of music on their respective islands. Overall, the music isn't bad at all but, after making use of such a generalized categorization as islands, much worthwhile music has been left out. Better compilations, etc., are available for any given one of the bands or locales, and those may be better picks for anyone who already has any idea whatsoever as to what they enjoy. --- Adam Greenberg, Rovi

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Putumayo Mon, 23 May 2016 15:39:41 +0000
Putumayo Presents: Latin Beat (2011) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/latin-french-italian/381-putumajo/19678-putumayo-presents-latin-beat-2011.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/latin-french-italian/381-putumajo/19678-putumayo-presents-latin-beat-2011.html Putumayo Presents: Latin Beat (2011)

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1. Goza - Moneda Dura
2. Locuraleza - Jontre
3. Jarocha - Locarno
4. Tequila (Gardener of Delight Mix Radio Edit) - Tape Five
5. Guajira - Grupo Lokito
6. En Movimiento (Una Mas Trio Remix) - Mr. Confuse
7. Asi Sin Querer - Digitano
8. La Cumbia Lounge - Charanga Cakewalk
9. Del Ray - Sola Rosa
10. Echele Guarapo (feat. Adriano Rodriquez) - Edesio
11. Pelo Shao (feat. Andrea Ruilova) - Sarazino
12. Bonita Mente - Bonita Suerte

Dan Storper - Executive Producer, Song Selection

 

Putumayo does its usual thang in compiling a series of global tracks that all represent the inroads made into Latin music by other forms rather than the other way around. Predictably, the results are mixed. These tracks, which come from Cuba, the U.S., New Zealand, Colombia, Spain, Ecuador, and even an amalgam from the U.K., Colombia, and Africa's Congo, all begin as Latin grooves, from cumbias to sons, to merengues and rumbas, and are added to by modern -- sometimes synthetic -- percussion, multi-layered vocals, keyboards, and guitars, while retaining their root Afro-Latin sounds. The best moments here are from Spain's Digitano on "Así Sin Querer," with its trip-hop and DJ beats meeting fado head-on in a seductive, sultry meld; Colombia's Profetas with "Chocolate," which uses rumba, jazz, and hip-hop with a gorgeous collaboration between singers and rappers and numerous instrumentalists; and Cuba's Calle 66 with "Quédate Donde Estás," with its big rhythms above a near traditional son. In a sense, given the name recognition of most of the artists here (all of whom have had hit singles and appear on other comps regularly), this is more for fans of Putumayo than those of "Latin beat." ---Thom Jurek, Rovi

 

A nice, multi-textured mix of traditional Latin dance styles -- son, cumbia, reggae, flamenco -- mixed with traces of dancetronica, funk, pop, hip-hop and rock. I like that most of the songs seem to come from a more traditional, Latin-American base, rather than adding "Latin spice" to modern pop songs: the groove is both heavier and more subtle, and several tracks have a pleasantly narcotic, hypnotic groove. Some artists, like Grupo Lokito, play straight-up old-school son while others, such as New Zealand's Sola Rosa tweak things around and bend your ears a bit. Not surprisingly, Columbia and Cuba are the best represented countries, although Spain, the US and UK also get their licks in... I would have enjoyed a bit of Mexico's "Nortec" scene in the mix (some amazing stuff happening there!) but like many Putumayo sets, this can point you in some interesting directions. If you like old-school, but have new ears, you could give this a spin and see what happens. ---DJ Joe Sixpack, Slipcue Guide To World Music

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Putumayo Sun, 08 May 2016 15:59:38 +0000