Jazz The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/500.html Tue, 07 Jul 2020 21:04:29 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Julie London - Best 20 (1988) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/500-julielondon/7940-julie-london-best-20.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/500-julielondon/7940-julie-london-best-20.html Julie London - Best 20 (1988)

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01. I left my heart in San Fransisco
02. Cry Me A River play
03. Never On Sunday
04. Amor
05. Misty
06. Fly Me To The Moon
07. Charade
08. A Taste Of Honey
09. In The Still Of The Night
10. The End Of The World
11. Love Letters play
12. Fascination
13. A Boy On A Dolphin
14. The Days Of Wine And Roses
15. Sway (Quien Sera)
16. Slightly Out Of Tune (Desafinado)
17. Theme From A Summer Place
18. Besame Mucho
19. My heart belongs to daddy
20. Vaya Con Dios

 

Julie London (September 26, 1926 – October 18, 2000) was an American singer, game show panelist and prolific character actress of stage, film and television. Best known for her smoky, sensual voice, she was at her singing career's peak in the 1950s. Her acting career lasted more than 35 years, concluding with the female lead role of nurse Dixie McCall on the television series Emergency! (1972–1979), co-starring her best friend Robert Fuller and her real-life husband Bobby Troup.

 

Julie London, właśc. Gayle Peck (ur. 26 września 1926, zm. 18 października 2000) – amerykańska aktorka i piosenkarka jazz-pop. Największe triumfy święciła w latach 50. XX wieku. Nagrała ponad 30 albumów, a jej kariera aktorska trwała niemal 40 lat. Jej drugim mężem był Bobby Troup, autor m.in. "Route 66" i "The Girl Can't Help It". Jednym z jej przebojów była piosenka "Cry Me a River" (1955).

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Julie London Mon, 17 Jan 2011 19:44:14 +0000
Julie London - Feeling Good (1965) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/500-julielondon/14122-julie-london-feeling-good-1965.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/500-julielondon/14122-julie-london-feeling-good-1965.html Julie London - Feeling Good (1965)

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A1	My Kind of Town	 	2:56
A2	Girl Talk	 	2:32
A3	King of the Road	 	2:25
A4	I Bruise Easily	 	3:37
A5	Feeling Good	 	3:03
B1	Watermelon Man	 	2:35
B2	She's Just a Quiet Girl (Mae)	 	2:40
B3	Summertime	 	3:10
B4	Hello Dolly!	 	3:00
B5	Won't Someone Please belong to Me	 	3:42

Personnel:
    Jack Wilson - piano and organ
    Teddy Edwards - sax
    John Gray - guitar
    Jimmy Bond - bass
    Earl Palmer – drums

 

Feeling Good pairs Julie London with arranger Gerald Wilson, who jettisons the spare ambience of her previous records in favor of a dynamic, big-band-inspired approach that casts the singer in an entirely different light. Make no mistake -- London's purring vocals are as sultry as ever, but they also boast a new playfulness that's undeniably appealing. Much of the material originates from the mid-'60s hit parade, including buoyant renditions of "King of the Road" and "Watermelon Man," but the highlights capture the full scope of London's rapturous femininity. "Girl Talk" warmly satirizes the ever-growing vogue for gossip, while "I Bruise Easily" is a sharply etched portrait of the mating dance. --- Jason Ankeny, Rovi

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Julie London Fri, 17 May 2013 16:07:56 +0000
Julie London - Julie Is Her Name (1955) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/500-julielondon/11184-julie-london-julie-is-her-name-1955.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/500-julielondon/11184-julie-london-julie-is-her-name-1955.html Julie London - Julie Is Her Name (1955)

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1.Say It Isn't So
2. It Never Entered My Mind 
3.Easy Street
4. 'S Wonderful
5. No Moon at All 
6.Laura										play
7. Gone with the Wind
8. Cry Me a River
9. I Should Care
10.I'm in the Mood for Love
11. I'm Glad There Is You
12. Can't Help Lovin' That Man
13. I Love You
14. Blue moon [2:31]
15. What is this thing called love [1:47]
16. How long has this been going on [2:46]
17. Too good to be true [2:42]
18. Spring is here [2:08]
19. Goody goody [2:18]
20. The one I love belongs to somebody Else [2:04]	play
21. If i'm lucky [2:18]
22. Hot Toddy [1:50]
23. Little white lies [2:49]
24. I guess i'll have to change my plan [1:47]
25. I got lost in his arms [2:05]

 

Julie is Her Name is one of the two best Julie London albums. London is accompanied by guitar player, Barney Kessel. In most of her later albums, Julie is accompanied by a full orchestra. These orchestras tended to over-shadow her beautiful voice. She sounds better with just a guitar. Her next album, 'Lonely Girl,' (she sings with guitarist Al Viola) is as good or better. ---amazon.com

Although she's now in her senior citizen years, listen to Julie London's stunning 1955 debut, and you'll still think she's one of the hottest creatures on two legs. "The girl with the come hither voice" is how the original liner notes described it, and London's sultry vocals simply oozed it. With the first track--which became her first single--London's legend was etched in stone. "Cry Me a River" became one of the greatest torch songs of all-time, and while it's been reinterpreted over the last 40 years by everyone from Streisand to Joe Cocker, the song forever belongs to London. The other standards here--from the likes of Irving Berlin, Kern & Hammerstein, and the Gershwins--are nothing to slouch at, and one listen to her version of "I'm in the Mood for Love," and you just may be, too. She's semi-famous for being the ex-Mrs. Jack (Dragnet) Webb and, later, Mrs. Bobby ("Route 66") Troup--but genuinely forever famous for this LP. Female lounge singers have been trying to sound just like her ever since. --Bill Holdship, Editorial reviews

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Julie London Tue, 20 Dec 2011 09:16:12 +0000
Julie London - Sophisticated Lady (1962) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/500-julielondon/11221-julie-london-sophisticated-lady-1962.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/500-julielondon/11221-julie-london-sophisticated-lady-1962.html Julie London - Sophisticated Lady (1962)

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01. Sophisticated Lady 				play
02. Blame It on My Youth 
03. Make It Another Old-Fashioned, Please 
04. You're Blase 
05. Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered 
06. Spring Can Really Hang You up the Most 
07. Remind Me 
08. When She Makes Music 
09. When the World Was Young 
10. If I Should Lose You 
11. Where Am I to Go 
12. Absent Minded Me				play

 

"Sophisticated" is the right word to describe Julie London's cool vocal approach; it can be shoved into the background, but if you listen closely there's a lot of turmoil going on under its seemingly calm surface. Similar to Chet Baker's unruffled way with a lyric, London's self-described "thimble full of a voice" ends up describing how pain hasn't quite iced over all her emotions rather than proving how unfeeling she is. Also like Baker, so many of her best recordings are steeped in the style and mood of laid-back West Coast jazz. "Sophisticated Lady" is one of a string of records London cut in the early '60s with less of a jazz feel than most of her sessions from the '50s, but it's still a worthy album. If it's not exactly an essential session, it is a good one, and the backing orchestra is to blame for the album's shortcomings -- not the vocalist. The charts balance a mellow -- very mellow -- kind of 1940s-era swing feeling (think of Tommy Dorsey or Glenn Miller doing a slow-dance number) with heavy string statements and semi-classical passages. They aren't particularly obtrusive or bad charts, but they are undistinguished, and the arranger for the date doesn't even get a credit on the album sleeve. It's these arrangements, not London's vocal performance, that make this a mediocre, but still worthy, album. (To hear how this approach is done correctly, just listen to Nelson Riddle's beautiful and more jazz-flavored work on Frank Sinatra's exquisite "Nice 'N' Easy" album.) That's not to say it's not a good disc, though, and standout tracks include Cole Porter's witty "booze as a cure for heartache" number "Make It Another Old-Fashioned Please" and three songs by writers associated with cool jazz. The Wolf/Landesman cut "Spring Can Really Hang You up the Most" has deservedly earned its status as a standard, but the neglected "Absent Minded Me" by Bob Merrill and Bobby Troup's "Where Am I to Go" deserve to be rediscovered and more widely recorded. --- Nick Dedina, AMG

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Julie London Fri, 23 Dec 2011 09:22:32 +0000
Julie London - The Ultimate Collection (2006) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/500-julielondon/11398-julie-london-the-ultimate-collection-3cd-2006.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/500-julielondon/11398-julie-london-the-ultimate-collection-3cd-2006.html Julie London - The Ultimate Collection (2006)

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CD1
01. Sophisticated Lady [0:02:36]
02. Cry Me A River [0:02:50]
03. Boy On A Dolphin [0:02:12]
04. Around Midnight [0:02:54]
05. Love For Sale [0:02:39]
06. You'd Be So Nice To Come Home To [0:02:15]
07. Blue Moon [0:02:32]							play
08. Days Of Wine And Roses [0:02:54]
09. My Heart Belongs To Daddy [0:02:42]
10. When I Fall In Love [0:03:23]
11. Two Sleepy People [0:03:16]
12. The More I See You [0:03:03]
13. 'S Wonderful [0:01:35]
14. One For My Baby [0:04:09]
15. Moments Like This [0:02:40]

CD2
01. Fly Me To The Moon [0:02:36]
02. I Love You [0:01:52]
03. Let There Be Love [0:02:04]
04. Mad About The Boy [0:02:13]
05. Sentimental Journey [0:02:27]
06. There Will Never Be Another You [0:03:16]
07. Vaya Con Dios [0:02:41]
08. Our Day Will Come [0:02:21]
09. In The Wee Small Hours Of The Morning [0:02:50]
10. I'm In The Mood For Love [0:02:30]				play
11. Goodbye [0:02:24]
12. Easy Street [0:03:16]
13. Every Time We Say Goodbye [0:04:25]
14. Give A Little Whistle [0:03:07]
15. Black Coffee [0:02:58]

CD3
01. Call Me Irresponsible [0:02:50]
02. Diamonds Are A Girls Best Friend [0:02:02]
03. Hot Toddy [0:01:52]
04. I've Got A Crush On You [0:02:14]
05. Baby Wont You Please Come Home [0:02:12]
06. Bewitched [0:02:53.67]
07. I Left My Heart In San Franscisco [0:02:49]
08. I Should Care [0:03:19]
09. Love Letters [0:02:53]						play
10. Must Be Catchin [0:02:09]
11. It Could Happen To You [0:03:12]
12. Memphis In June [0:02:00]
13. If I'm Lucky [0:02:19]
14. I Got It Bad [0:03:58]
15. You Made Me Love You [0:02:16]

 

This 3-disc set is exceptional value for Julie London fans, comprising tracks from the early years of her recording career, through the Liberty singles as well as her Capitol recordings. Julie London's sultry, come-hither vocal delivery is evident throughout such numbers as "'Round Midnight", "When I Fall in Love", "In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning", "Hot Toddy" and "I Got it Bad". There are also fun numbers like "Give a Little Whistle" and "My Heart Belongs to Daddy".

Julie London was her own worst enemy when it came to her musical career; she never felt that her voice was special, nor did she think her overall musicality as good as other jazz singers of the period. While she did have some healthy competition from such singers as June Christy, Rosemary Clooney and Peggy Lee, Ms London managed to hold her own, garnered a legion of devoted fans, and recorded many chart albums. A fantastic gift for the Julie London fan in your house! --- Byron Kolln, amazon.com

 

Julie London (September 26, 1926 – October 18, 2000) was an American singer and actress. She was best known for her smoky, sensual voice. London was at her singing career's peak in the 1950s. Her acting career lasted more than 35 years. It concluded with the female lead role of nurse Dixie McCall on the television series Emergency! (1972–1979), co-starring her best friend Robert Fuller and her real-life husband Bobby Troup, and produced by her ex-husband Jack Webb.

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Julie London Sun, 15 Jan 2012 19:51:31 +0000
Julie London – About The Blues (1957) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/500-julielondon/979-aboutblues57.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/500-julielondon/979-aboutblues57.html Julie London – About The Blues (1957)

Side 1:
01) Basin Street Blues
02) I Got A Right To Sing The Blues
03) A Nightingale Can Sing The Blues
04) Get Set For The Blues
05) An Invitation To The Blues
06) Bye Bye Blues

Side 2:
01) Meaning Of The Blues
02) About The Blues
03) Sunday Blues
04) The Blues Is All I Ever Had
05) Blues In The Night
06) Bouquet Of Blues

Julie London - Vocals
Russell Garcia - Arranger, Conductor

 

Julie London wasn't really a jazz singer, but she possessed a definite jazz feeling and many of her finest albums (such as Julie Is Her Name and Julie...At Home) feature small-group jazz backings. About the Blues was aimed at the 1950s pop market, but it may just be her best orchestral session. Since downbeat torch songs were London's specialty, the album features an excellent selection of nocturnal but classy blues songs that play to her subtle strengths instead of against them. Likewise, Russ Garcia's clever arrangements bleed jazz touches and short solos over the solitary strings and big-band charts. Like June Christy, London usually included a couple of new songs in with a selection of standards, and her husband, Bobby Troup, wrote two excellent numbers for the album. One of them, the emotionally devastating "Meaning of the Blues," is the album's highlight, and was turned into a jazz standard after Miles Davis recorded it the same year for Miles Ahead. ---Nick Dedina, Rovi

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Julie London Sun, 18 Oct 2009 21:01:01 +0000
Julie London – In Person: Julie London At The Americana (1964) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/500-julielondon/3406-julie-london-in-person-at-the-americana-1964.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/500-julielondon/3406-julie-london-in-person-at-the-americana-1964.html Julie London – In Person: Julie London At The Americana (1964)

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Side 1:
01) Opening - Lonesome Road
02) Send For Me
03) My Baby Just Cares For Me
04) The Trolley Song
05) Daddy
06) Medley

Side 2:
01) Kansas City
02) Bye Bye Blackbird
03) By Myself
04) I Love Paris
05) Gotta Move
06) Cry Me A River
07) The Man That Got Away - Closing
Julie London - Vocals Don Bagley - Arranger, Conductor

 

Well into her mid-thirties, Julie London was also well past her commercial prime when she cut this live album for release in 1964. Actually, she had mounted something of a comeback the previous year with the LPs The End of the World and The Wonderful World of Julie London, both of which made the charts for her after a gap of six years from her 1955-1957 commercial heyday, but Julie London, released earlier in 1964, had not charted. London's film work was also at a low ebb; she had not appeared onscreen since 1961's The George Raft Story. But this was all the more reason to emphasize the personal appearance aspect of her career by recording a live album. Cut at the Royal Box of the Americana Hotel in New York City, this LP might as well have come from Las Vegas, since it was a glitzy affair that surrounded the star with a big band and a bevy of backup singers. She borrowed from Judy Garland for "The Trolley Song" (a number largely taken over by the choral accompaniment) and "The Man That Got Away," while her husband Bobby Troup provided his 1941 hit "Daddy" and 1948's "Baby, Baby All the Time," the latter in a medley with "Basin Street Blues" and "St. Louis Woman." London was at her best in the sexy, playful "Daddy," which brought out her personality. One could only imagine that there was a stage show to accompany these numbers that would have made the performance even more compelling, but London was still able to convey her breathy, bluesy charm. By 1964, that charm was coming to seem adult more in the sense of "aging" rather than "provocative," not only because of the singer's advancing years but because she, like everyone in her area of musical entertainment, was being marginalized by the Beatles and their ilk. So, Julie London in Person at the Americana seemed somewhat old-fashioned even on the day it was released. ---William Ruhlmann, Rovi

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Julie London Fri, 05 Feb 2010 15:00:11 +0000
Julie London – Julie - Love On The Rocks (2006) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/500-julielondon/7323-julie-london-julie-love-on-the-rocks-2006.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/500-julielondon/7323-julie-london-julie-love-on-the-rocks-2006.html Julie London – Julie - Love On The Rocks (2006)

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01. Somebody Loves Me (3:01)
02. Dream Of You (2:42)
03. Daddy (2:17)
04. Bye Bye Blackbird (2:33) play
05. Free And Easy (2:18)
06. All My Life (3:06)
07. When The Red Red Robin Comes A Bob Bobobbin’ Along (1:43)
08. Midnight Sun (2:29)
09. You’re Getting To Be A Habit With Me (2:29)
10. Don’cha Go ‘Way Mad (2:38)
11. (Back Home) In Indiana (2:54)
12. For You (2:42)
13. Love On The Rocks (2:39) play
14. Guess Who I Saw Today (3:07)
15. Where Are You (2:34)
16. How Did He Look (2:36)
17. What’s New (2:36)
18. A Cottage For Sale (2:33)
19. The End Of A Love Affair (2:17)
20. I’ll Be Seeing You (2:08)
21. Where Did The Gentleman Go (2:56)
22. Don’t Worry ‘Bout Me (2:37)
23. The Man That Got Away (3:36)
24. Willow Weep For Me (3:21)

Tracks 1 to 12 from the 1958 Liberty/EMI Records release “Julie” (LRP-3096).
Tracks 13 to 24 from the 1963 Liberty/EMI Records release “Love On The Rocks” (SLBY-1113).

 

Julie London had her critics and plenty of them, not only among those who didn’t like her style of music, but also among those who think that plenty of other people could do better. Sure, Julie’s voice had its limitations, but Julie knew that and invariably recorded material that showed her voice to best advantage. As a consequence, her album were filled with romantic ballads and those presented in this twofer are no exception. Julie’s music changed through the years, with the very sparse backing of her early albums giving way to a more substantial orchestral backing, but Julie’s sultry voice was always the dominant instrument throughout. The contrast in musical backing is illustrated here, with the first album, Julie, dating from 1957 and the second, Love on the rocks, dating from 1963. There’s a further contrast provided by the moods of the respective album, with the first album being mainly upbeat and the second album being all about heartbreak. Although some of the songs will be very familiar to fans of the Great American Songbook, there are plenty of less famous songs including at least one original song on each album from the pen of Julie’s husband and record producer, Bobby Troup.

The first album opens with Somebody loves me, from a 1924 Broadway musical. Two instrumental versions (Paul Whiteman, Ray Miller) were enormously popular that year, while two vocal versions (Marion Harris, Cliff Edwards) were successful in 1925. Another popular song from the twenties featured here is Bye bye blackbird., which was originally successful for Gene Austin in 1926. (It is worth noting that Gene Austin was the most popular singer in America during the late twenties and his other successes included Yes sir that’s my baby, Five feet two eyes of blue, Tonight you belong to me, My blue heaven and Carolina moon, all of which have stood the test of time well even though Gene Austin himself is largely forgotten.) Completing a trio of twenties classics is When the red red robin comes a bob bobbin’ along. Several singers were successful with this song in 1926, none more so than Al Jolson. Doris Day had a minor hit when reviving it in 1953. From the thirties, there’s the classic You’re getting to be a habit with me. Diana Krall fans know this song from her album, Love scenes, but Bing Crosby was the original artist in 1933, it being one his early successes that laid the foundation for a great career. There are many other great, if less famous, songs, on this album.

The second album is a concept album based on the title track. As you can imagine, all the songs are very sad, exploring the different emotions and events in the life of a spurned woman. I don’t know what inspired Julie to record this album. Perhaps it was about her first husband (Bobby Troup was her second), but whatever the reason, Julie was, as ever, in top form when recording it. Among the great songs here are What’s new?, I’ll be seeing you, Don’t worry ’bout me and Willow weep for me, but there are many other wonderful songs including my favorite here, A cottage for sale, which was originally successful for Guy Lombardo in 1930.

Julie recorded many excellent albums and the two presented here are among the best. Most of her albums have now appeared on CD, showing that her music remains popular despite the critics. ---Peter Durward Harris

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Julie London Fri, 05 Nov 2010 21:04:36 +0000
Julie London – Swing Me An Old Song (1959) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/500-julielondon/980-swingmoldsong.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/500-julielondon/980-swingmoldsong.html Julie London – Swing Me An Old Song (1959)

Side 1:
01) Comin' Thru The Rye
02) Cuddle Up A Little Closer
03) After The Ball
04) Be My Little Bumble Bee
05) Camptown Races
06) Old Folks At Home

Side 2:
01) Darktown Strutters' Ball
02) How Come You Do Me Like You Do
03) Row Row Row
04) By The Beautiful Sea
05) Bill Bailey Won't You Please Come Home
06) Three O'Clock In The Morcing

 

Everyone seems to have forgotten that rock & roll wasn't doing so hot with white audiences at the tail end of the 1950s until the Beatles hit the scene and had everyone going electric again. Instead of rockabilly, folk music and Dixieland jazz were huge in 1959 and young audiences were getting into old-time songs that their parents and grandparents knew. Swing Me an Old Song was Julie London's Dixieland-spiced folk revival effort. If it doesn't actually play to her strengths to be cast as a sexed-up version of Burl Ives, it takes some kind of real talent to be able to coo such hoary chestnuts as "Camptown Races" and "Row, Row, Row, Your Boat" without embarrassing yourself too much. Thankfully, the song selection on most of the album is better than these two egregious examples of stale singalongs that should never have made it outside of summer camp. Tracks like "Cuddle up a Little Closer" and "Darktown Strutters Ball" fit London like a satin glove, as does her downbeat take on "Bill Bailey, Won't You Please Come Home" (though she would cut an even better version of this on her 1966 release For the Night People). During the same year as Swing Me an Old Song, London also cut the cool jazz album Julie...at Home (which may just be her single finest work) and Your Number Please..., a swank orchestral set of standards. People often mention Julie London's limited vocal range, but it's surprising how far that her talent could stretch. ---Nick Dedina, Rovi

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Julie London Sun, 18 Oct 2009 21:02:16 +0000
Julie London – The Very Best Of (2005) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/500-julielondon/981-verybestjulielondon.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/500-julielondon/981-verybestjulielondon.html Julie London – The Very Best Of (2005)

CD1
01. Fly Me To The Moon
02. Cry Me A River
03. Blue Moon
04. Sway
05. My Heart Belongs To Daddy
06. When I Fall In Love
07. Can't Help Lovin' That Man
08. Misty
09. Lover Man
10. Desafinado
11. Girl Talk
12. Let There Be Love
13. Wives And Lovers
14. In The Wee Small Hours Of The Morning
15. Making Whoopee
16. The Good Life
17. The More I See You
18. A Taste Of Honey
19. Go Slow
20. You And The Night And The Music
21. Black Coffee
22. Basin Street Blues
23. Blues In The Night
24. 'Round Midnight
25. As Time Goes By

CD2
01. Can't Get Used To Losing You
02. September In The Rain
03. Mad About The Boy
04. Love Letters
05. I Left My Heart In San Francisco
06. Diamonds Are A Girls Best Friend
07. Goody Goody
08. Days Of Wine And Roses
09. You'd Be So Nice To Come Home To
10. Light My Fire
11. Here's That Rainy Day
12. Body & Soul
13. God Bless The Child
14. They Can't Take That Away From Me
15. Our Day Will Come
16. I've Got You Under My Skin
17. The End Of The World
18. One For My Baby
19. Love For Sale
20. Sentimental Journey
21. I've Got A Crush On You
22. Call Me Irresponsible
23. You Made Me Love You
24. Nice Girls Don't Stay For Breakfast
25. Ev'ry Time We Say Goodbye

 

A sultry, smoky-voiced master of understatement, Julie London enjoyed considerable popularity during the cool era of the 1950s. London never had the range of Ella Fitzgerald or Sarah Vaughan, but often used restraint, softness, and subtlety to maximum advantage. An actress as well as a singer, London played with heavyweights like Gregory Peck and Rock Hudson in various films, and was married to Jack Webb of Dragnet fame for seven years before marrying songwriter Bobby Troup ("Route 66"). London performed her biggest hit, "Cry Me a River," in the Jayne Mansfield film The Girl Can't Help It. After recording her last album, Yummy, Yummy, Yummy, in 1969, she continued to act -- playing a nurse on the NBC medical drama Emergency from 1974-1978. Despite her "sex symbol" image -- London was known for her sexy LP covers, which make them collector's items -- she was surprisingly shy, and left show biz altogether in the late '70s. In the mid-'90s London suffered a stroke, which led to a half-decade of poor health and ultimately contributed to her death on October 18, 2000. ---Alex Henderson, Rovi

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Julie London Sun, 18 Oct 2009 21:04:20 +0000