Jazz The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/2284.html Thu, 18 Apr 2024 06:17:35 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Earl 'Fatha' Hines - The Classic Years (2001) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/2284-earl-hines/8089-earl-fatha-hines-the-classic-years-2001.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/2284-earl-hines/8089-earl-fatha-hines-the-classic-years-2001.html Earl 'Fatha' Hines - The Classic Years (2001)

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1.Earl, The
2.Smoke House Blues
3.Ridin'A Riff
4.Father's Gateway, The
5.Harlem Lament
6.Piano Man
7.Chimes In Blues
8.A Monday Date
9.Rosetta
10.Honeysuckle Rose
11.Blues In Thirds
12.Cavernism
13.Solid Mama
14.Stowaway
15.Boogie Woogie On St. Louis Blues play
16.57 Varieties
17.Weatherbird
18.Chicago Rhythm play

 

Kolekcja nagrań wielkiego jazzowego pianisty, zarówno solowych, granych w małych składach, jak i jego orkiestry.

 

Earl Kenneth Hines, universally known as Earl "Fatha" Hines, (December 28, 1903 – April 22, 1983) was "one of a small number of pianists whose playing shaped the history of jazz". In 1925, after much debate, Hines moved to Chicago, Illinois, then the world's "jazz" capital, home (at the time) to Jelly Roll Morton and King Oliver. In the poolroom at Chicago's Musicians' Union on State & 39th, Earl Hines met Louis Armstrong. Hines was 21, Armstrong 24. They played together at the Union piano. Armstrong was astounded by Hines's avant-garde "trumpet-style" piano-playing, often using dazzlingly fast octaves so that on none-too-perfect upright pianos (and with no amplification) "they could hear me out front" - as indeed they could.

On 28 December 1928 the always-immaculate Hines opened at Chicago's Grand Terrace Cafe leading his own big band, the pinnacle of jazz ambition at the time "All America was dancing" - and for the next 12 years and through the worst of the Great Depression and Prohibition Earl Hines was "The Orchestra" in The Grand Terrace. At the start of 1948, Hines rejoined Armstrong (rather, he now came to feel, as a "sideman") in Armstrong's "small band", The All Stars and stayed, not entirely happily, through 1951. In 1964 Hines was "suddenly rediscovered" following a series of 'recitals' at The Little Theatre in New York that Dance had cajoled him into. They were the first piano 'recitals' Hines - always thinking of himself as "just a band pianist" - had ever given. These 'recitals' caused a sensation.

From then until he died twenty years later Hines recorded endlessly both solo and with jazz notable. He played solo in The White House (twice) and played solo for The Pope—and played (and sang) his last show in San Francisco a few days before he died in Oakland, quite likely somewhat older than he had always maintained.

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Earl Hines Tue, 01 Feb 2011 10:10:04 +0000
Earl Hines - Concert (1966) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/2284-earl-hines/9354-earl-hines-concert-1970.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/2284-earl-hines/9354-earl-hines-concert-1970.html Earl Hines - Concert (1966)

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01 - I've Got a World On a String		play
02 - I Cover the Waterfront
03 - Rosetta
04 - I Know a Little Bit
05 - A Kiss To Build a Dream On			play
06 - Do You Know What's Means To Miss New Orleans
07 - St. Louis Blues (Boogie Woogie On)

Earl Hines – piano
Richard Davis – bass
Elvin Jones - drums

Vinyl LP recorded live in Scandiano, Reggio Emilia, Italy on 14th February 1966

 

Earl Hines has been called the first modern jazz pianist. His style differed from other pianists of the Twenties in his use of what were then considered unusual rhythms and accents. Jelly Roll Morton had set the direction of Jazz piano in the early part of the decade, but after 1926 Hines was at the forefront of the Hot Jazz style.

1928 was a productive year for Hines. He recorded his first ten piano solos including versions of "A Monday Date," "Blues in Thirds" and "57 Varieties." Hines worked much of the year with Jimmie Noone's Apex Club Orchestra. Hines joined Louis Armstrong on the Hot Five and Hot Seven recording sessions, playing on the classic "West End Blues," "Fireworks," "Basin Street Blues" and composing " A Monday Date." On his birthday that year, Hines debuted with his first big band. Earl would continue to lead his own big bands until 1948. In 1940 Billy Eckstine became the band's popular singer and in 1943 both Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker were added.

In 1948 Hines joined the Louis Armstrong's All-Stars and played with them for three years. In 1951, Hines moved to California and formed a Hot Jazz band to cash in on the Dixieland revival that was going on at the time. He continued the Dixieland band throughout the Fifties, but by the early Sixties, Hines was pretty much out of the Jazz mainstream and forgotten. In 1964 he staged a major comeback that lasted through the rest of his career.

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Earl Hines Thu, 02 Jun 2011 08:34:56 +0000
Earl Hines - Piano Man! (1994) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/2284-earl-hines/14539-earl-hines-piano-man-1994.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/2284-earl-hines/14539-earl-hines-piano-man-1994.html Earl Hines - Piano Man! (1994)

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1. Piano Man
2. Fireworks
3. Skip the Gutter
4. Two Deuces
5. Weather Bird
6. Every Evening
7. Smoke-House Blues
8. Honeysuckle Rose
9. Blues in Thirds (Caution Blues)
10.Save It Pretty Mama
11.A Monday Date
12.Stowaway
13.Chimes in Blues
14.Fifty-Seven Varieties
15.Love Me Tonight
16.The Father's Getaway
17.Chicago Rhythm
18.Rosetta
19.Cavernism
20.Harlem Lament
21.Ridin' a Riff
22.Solid Mama
23.Comin' in Home
24.The Earl
25.Boogie Woogie on St. Louis Blues

1 - Earl Hines and his Orchestra. Rec. 1939, NY
2-3 - Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five Rec. 1928, Chicago
4 - Louis Armstrong (trumpet), Earl Hines (piano)
Rec. as 2-3
5 - Jimmy Noone's Apex Club Orchestra Rec. as 2-3
6 - Omer Simeon (clarinet), Earl Hines (piano)
Rec as 2-3
7 - Earl Hines Quartet Earl Hines (piano),Budd Johnson
(tenor sax),Omer Simeon (clarinet),Wallace Bishop
(drums) Rec. 1929, Chicago
8 - Sidney Bechet (clarinet),Earl Hines (piano),Baby
Dodds (drums) Rec. 1937, Chicago
9 - Sidney Bechet and his New Orleans Feetwarmers
Sidney Bechet (clarinet,soprano sax),Earl Hines (piano)
Rex Stewart (cornet),John Lindsay (bass),Baby Dodds
(drums) Rec. 1940, NY
10-13 Earl Hines - piano solo Rec. 10 - 1940, 11-13 - 1928
14-25 Earl Hines and his Orchestra Rec. 1928-1941

 

Earl Hines has been called the first modern jazz pianist. His style differed from other pianists of the Twenties in his use of what were then considered unusual rhythms and accents. Jelly Roll Morton had set the direction of Jazz piano in the early part of the decade, but after 1926 Hines was at the forefront of the Hot Jazz style. Hines started playing professionally around 1921 in Pittsburgh. In 1923 Hines moved to Chicago where he worked with Deppe's Seranaders, Erskine Tate's Vendome Orchestra and with Carroll Dickerson. He met Louis Armstrong in 1926, at the local musician's union hall and the two became friends. Hines worked briefly in Louis Armstrong's Stompers and along with Zutty Singleton and Armstrong tried unsuccessfully to manage their own club together in Chicago. 1928 was a productive year for Hines. He recorded his first ten piano solos including versions of "A Monday Date," "Blues in Thirds" and "57 Varieties."

Hines worked much of the year with Jimmie Noone's Apex Club Orchestra. Hines joined Louis Armstrong on the Hot Five and Hot Seven recording sessions, playing on the classic "West End Blues," "Fireworks," "Basin Street Blues" and composing " A Monday Date." On his birthday that year, Hines debuted with his first big band. Earl would continue to lead his own big bands until 1948. In 1940 Billy Eckstine became the band's popular singer and in 1943 both Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker were added.

In 1948 Hines joined the Louis Armstrong's All-Stars and played with them for three years. In 1951, Hines moved to California and formed a Hot Jazz band to cash in on the Dixieland revival that was going on at the time. He continued the Dixieland band throughout the Fifties, but by the early Sixties, Hines was pretty much out of the Jazz mainstream and forgotten. In 1964 he staged a major comeback that lasted through the rest of his career. --- redhotjazz.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Earl Hines Sat, 03 Aug 2013 16:16:53 +0000
Earl Hines ‎– Earl Hines Plays Cole Porter (1996) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/2284-earl-hines/24335-earl-hines--earl-hines-plays-cole-porter-1996.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/2284-earl-hines/24335-earl-hines--earl-hines-plays-cole-porter-1996.html Earl Hines ‎– Earl Hines Plays Cole Porter (1996)

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1 	You Do Something To Me 	7:38
2 	Night And Day 	9:48
3 	Rosalie 	4:05
4 	I've Got You Under My Skin 	8:11
5 	I Get A Kick Out Of You 	4:10
6 	What Is This Thing Called Love 	4:59
7 	Easy To Love 	7:38

Earl Hines - piano

 

1974 was a watershed year in the career of Earl Hines. Sixteen LPs were issued that year under his name, including this, his only record of Cole Porter songs. At the age of 71, his pianistic powers remained undiminished and Porter's melodically and harmonically rich songs provided the perfect vehicle for Hines's fertile imagination to take wing. The full range of his enviable technique—in another age he could have been a classical virtuoso—is on display for all to admire: perfectly articulated trills, roulades, tremolos, broken chords, rubato, a seemingly inexhaustible variety of touch, and of course, his unmatched rhythmic daring.

Porter's songs are illuminated in previously unimagined ways—a true meeting of minds and a heady cocktail that leaves one a bit giddy but happily so. Any of these recordings could serve as a master class in the art of jazz piano or improvisation in general. Excellent liner notes and a selected discography by noted jazz scholar Dan Morgenstern. ---newworldrecords.org

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Earl Hines Tue, 06 Nov 2018 09:19:55 +0000