Jazz The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/1145.html Tue, 09 Aug 2022 02:38:37 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Lee Morgan - Dizzy Athmosphere (1957) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/1145-lee-morgan/12029-lee-morgan-dizzy-athmosphere-1957.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/1145-lee-morgan/12029-lee-morgan-dizzy-athmosphere-1957.html Lee Morgan - Dizzy Athmosphere (1957)

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01. Dishwater (take 4) 12:05
02. Someone I Know (take 6) 3:59
03. D. D. T. (take 5) 4:04
04. Whisper Not (take 5) 5:55
05. About Time (take 5) 3:14
06. Day By Day (take 2) 3:26
07. Rite Of Swing (take 3) 3:14
08. Over The Rainbow (take 4) 4:18
09. Someone I Know (previously unreleased, take 3, alternate) 4:07
10. Whisper Not (previously unreleased, take 3-, alternate) 6:01
11. Over The Rainbow (previously unreleased, take 3, alternate) 4:34

Musicians:
Lee Morgan- (Trumpet);
Wynton Kelly- (Piano);
Billy Mitchell- (Tenor Sax);
Billy Root- (Baritone Sax);
Al Grey- (Trombone);
Paul West- (Bass);
Charles Persip- (Drums).

 

This somewhat obscure Lee Morgan set (originally cut for Specialty and made available on CD in the OJC series) features the trumpeter with other then-current members of the Dizzy Gillespie big band: trombonist Al Grey, tenor saxophonist Billy Mitchell, baritonist Billy Root, pianist Wynton Kelly, bassist Paul West, and drummer Charlie Persip. With arrangements provided by Benny Golson and Roger Spotts, the music is modern bop for the period. Highlights include the ten-and-a-half-minute "Dishwater," "Over the Rainbow," and what was probably the first-ever version of Golson's "Whisper Not." Morgan plays extremely well throughout the spirited set, and he was just 18 at the time ---Scott Yanow, AMG

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Lee Morgan Wed, 11 Apr 2012 15:36:29 +0000
Lee Morgan - Indeed! (1957) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/1145-lee-morgan/25860-lee-morgan-indeed-1957.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/1145-lee-morgan/25860-lee-morgan-indeed-1957.html Lee Morgan - Indeed! (1957)

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1 	Roccus	8:15
2 	Reggie Of Chester	4:51
3 	The Lady	6:44
4 	Little T (a.k.a. The New Message)	8:20
5 	Gaza Strip	3:52
6 	Stand By	5:48
7 	Little T (Alternate Take)	8:07

Alto Saxophone – Clarence Sharpe
Bass – Wilbur Ware
Drums – "Philly" Joe Jones
Piano – Horace Silver
Trumpet – Lee Morgan

Originally Recorded on November 4, 1956 at the Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, New Jersey
Originally issued in 1956 as Blue Note BLP 1538 

 

Lee Morgan hadn’t even celebrated his 20th birthday when he ventured into Rudy Van Gelder’s recording studio at Hackensack, New Jersey, on 29 September 1957, to record The Cooker. Originally from Philadelphia, Morgan (1938-1972) was a wunderkind trumpeter who idolised Clifford Brown (the groundbreaking hard bop horn blower who had perished in a car accident in 1956) and served his musical apprenticeship playing in the horn section of a short-lived big band led by another notable trumpeter – a puff-cheeked wind machine who went by the name of Dizzy Gillespie. That was in 1956, when Morgan was just 18.

Later the same year, he was offered a recording contract by New York’s Blue Note Records, then the leading jazz indie label, and recorded his inaugural LP for them, Lee Morgan Indeed!. There followed a spate of intense recording activity that saw the young trumpet prodigy record five more LPs within a period of ten and a half months. But as well as leading his own projects, news of Morgan’s prodigious, preternatural talent spread fast and he found himself recording as the trumpet foil to tenor saxophonist Hank Mobley, who was also signed to Blue Note. And, perhaps more significantly, just four days before he went to record what became The Cooker, Morgan was in Van Gelder Studio playing alongside rising tenor star and fellow Philadelphian John Coltrane, featuring on what is universally acknowledged as the saxophonist’s first truly great album, Blue Train. ---Charles Waring, udiscovermusic.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Lee Morgan Wed, 18 Sep 2019 14:59:46 +0000
Lee Morgan - Lee-Way (1960) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/1145-lee-morgan/6156-lee-morgan-lee-way-1960.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/1145-lee-morgan/6156-lee-morgan-lee-way-1960.html Lee Morgan - Lee-Way (1960)

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1 These Are Soulful Days 9:26
2 The Lion And The Wolff 9:43
3 Midtown Blues 12:11
4 Nakatini Suite 8:17

Personnel:
Lee Morgan (trumpet);
Jackie McClean (alto saxophone);
Bobby Timmons (piano);
Paul Chambers (bass);
Art Blakey (drums).

 

This date was one of trumpeter Lee Morgan's more obscure Blue Note sessions, but fortunately, it has been reissued on CD. Matched with altoist Jackie McLean, pianist Bobby Timmons, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Art Blakey, Morgan interprets two of Cal Massey's compositions, McLean's "Midtown Blues" and his own blues "The Lion and the Wolf." The music is essentially hard bop with a strong dose of soul; the very distinctive styles of the principals are the main reasons to acquire this enjoyable music. ---Scott Yanow, Rovi

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Lee Morgan Sun, 25 Jul 2010 12:52:32 +0000
Lee Morgan - The Cooker (1957) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/1145-lee-morgan/12009-lee-morgan-the-cooker-1957.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/1145-lee-morgan/12009-lee-morgan-the-cooker-1957.html Lee Morgan - The Cooker (1957)

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01 - A Night In Tunisia
02 - Heavy Dipper
03 - Just One Of Those Things
04 - Lover Man
05 - New-Ma
06 - Just One Of Those Things (Alternate Take)	

Personnel: 
Lee Morgan (trumpet); 
Pepper Adams (baritone saxophone); 
Bobby Timmons (piano); 
Paul Chambers (bass instrument); 
Philly Joe Jones (drum).

 

Although Lee Morgan had already made a handful of albums at the age of 19, The Cooker (1957) represents his throwing down the gauntlet as successor to Clifford Brown's vacated throne. It's close to being a pure bebop session, suggestive of a date like For Musicians Only (Verve, 1956), on which Gillespie, Stitt and Getz set some sort of record for NPS (notes per second). At the same time, the precocious trumpeter, already brimming with confidence, is not about to get reckless: he pulls a punch or two, most notably on the opening "Night in Tunisia."

Bebop was a musical language about comparisons, and Morgan was keenly aware of his predecessors. Charlie Parker's incredible four-bar break at the end of the sixteen-bar tag of Gillespie's signature piece on the 1947 Carnegie Hall concert (Diz 'N Bird at Carnegie Hall, Blue Note, 1997) had come to represent the gold standard of jazz improvisation, which Morgan had only begun to approach on his solo performances of the tune with the Gillespie big band (Dizzy Gillespie at Newport, Verve, 1957). And though Clifford Brown's version is equal parts inspired invention and stunning virtuosity (Art Blakey, A Night at Birdland, Vol. 1, Blue Note, 1954), the naked four-bar break is given to Lou Donaldson's alto saxophone, with arguably embarrassing results.

Morgan slyly eludes trouble yet takes the listener by surprise when he omits all but the tag's challenging four bars, which he then "wastes" by simply having bass and drums mark time. The listener's letdown is quickly offset, however, by a blistering trumpet solo starting on the first beat of the main chorus, demonstrating why the rising star chose such a deliberative tempo: almost the entirety of his two-chorus solo is played in double time. As dazzling as his execution is, Morgan has one more deception up his sleeve. On both the earlier Gillespie recording and a later Art Blakey date (A Night in Tunisia, Blue Note, 1960), the trumpeter makes sure he gets his piece said on the A7 altered chord of the tune's cadenza: on this occasion, he takes a complete pass!

The characteristically showy side of Morgan is in evidence on his "Heavy Dipper," an infectious, medium-tempo swinger. Anticipating trademark mannerisms—clipped notes, upward slurs, half-valving, triple-tonguing—his solo is still as flowing as it is playful.

The tempo of "Just One of Those Things" breaks the sound barrier while exposing one of the still-maturing musician's weaknesses: if a turn of phrase sounds good once, certainly playing it a few more times can't be a bad idea. Unfortunately, the effect of these ramped-up, "treadmill" moments can get uncomfortably close to "Carnival of Venice" showpiece territory. The alternate take of the tune proves more musically substantive, though the ballad number—the bebopper's requisite "Lover Man"—does little to advance the newcomer's cause.

Pepper Adams is an unrelenting juggernaut on the date, pushing the leader to rise to each challenge. Bobby Timmons, Paul Chambers and Philly Joe Jones supply all of the heat required for this cooking session, otherwise judiciously staying clear of the head chef, who serves up cuisine likely to impress even the fastidious gourmet. ---Samuel Chell, allaboutjazz.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Lee Morgan Sat, 07 Apr 2012 15:19:09 +0000
Lee Morgan - The Procrastinator (1995) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/1145-lee-morgan/22393-lee-morgan-the-procrastinator-1995.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/1145-lee-morgan/22393-lee-morgan-the-procrastinator-1995.html Lee Morgan - The Procrastinator (1995)

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1 	The Procrastinator 	8:05
2 	Party Time 	6:00
3 	Dear Sir 	6:53
4 	Stopstart 	6:09
5 	Rio 	6:10
6 	Soft Touch 	7:00

Lee Morgan (trumpet)
Wayne Shorter (tenor saxophone)
Bobby Hutcherson (vibraphone)
Herbie Hancock (piano)
Ron Carter (bass)
Billy Higgins (drums)

Rec. July 14, 1967 - October 10, 1969, 
New York, NY
Van Gelder Studios, Englewood Cliffs, NJ

 

It is surprising that Lee Morgan's The Procrastinator was not released when it was recorded in 1967 for the sextet (which includes Wayne Shorter, vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson, pianist Herbie Hancock, bassist Ron Carter and drummer Billy Higgins) lives up to their potential on a well-rounded set of originals by Morgan and Shorter. The music ranges from the funky "Party Time" (which sounds like it could have been written by Horace Silver) to more explorative pieces. ---Scott Yanow, AllMusic Review

 

Surely one of Morgan’s finest sessions, insanely cheap as a two-fer, should be on everyone’s shelf, no excuses. It’s the dream team of Hancock, Shorter, Carter, Hutcherson and Higgins, and the compositions are enormously strong. It was recorded around the same time as Miles was recording Nefertiti, so those tunes must have been going through the minds of Carter ,Hancock and Shorter as they ran with The Procrastinator, must have given their playing some edge, and rubbed off on Morgan.

The Procrastinator is swinging, bluesy, cool, adventurous and unstoppable listening, every track is a delight. It may well be Morgan’s “best album” (1,000 upticks), his compositions got more confident and original, though the idea of “best” is an unhelpful qualifier in jazz. Like the Mona Lisa is Da Vinci’s best painting, you don’t look at any others? It’s a conversation point, not a voting booth.

The second track Party Time was my second pick, followed by all the rest. No duds, everyone deserves repeated play, repeatedly. The idea that this session had to wait to 1978 to be released is simply outrageous. The fact you can pick it up on vintage vinyl for less than $20, for two LPs not one, is more than outrageous, it’s positively criminal. Some times the best things in life are next-to-free. Just not very often. Seize the day. ---londonjazzcollector.wordpress.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Lee Morgan Fri, 13 Oct 2017 13:32:01 +0000
Lee Morgan - The Rajah (1966) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/1145-lee-morgan/21129-lee-morgan-the-rajah-1966.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/1145-lee-morgan/21129-lee-morgan-the-rajah-1966.html Lee Morgan - The Rajah (1966)

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01 - A Pilgrim's Funny Farm 
02 - The Rajah 
03 - Is That So 
04 - Davisamba 
05 - What Not My Love 
06 - Once In A Lifetime 

Lee Morgan - trumpet 
Hank Mobley - tenor sax 
Cedar Walton - piano 
Paul Chambers - bass 
Billy Higgins – drums

 

This long-lost Lee Morgan session was not released for the first time until it was discovered in the Blue Note vaults by Michael Cuscuna in 1984; it has still not been reissued on CD. Originals by Cal Massey, Duke Pearson ("Is That So") and Walter Davis, in addition to a couple of surprising pop tunes ("What Not My Love" and "Once in My Lifetime") and Morgan's title cut, are well-played by the quintet (which includes the trumpeter/leader, Hank Mobley on tenor, pianist Cedar Walton, bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Billy Higgins). Much of the music is reminiscent of The Jazz Messengers and that may have been the reason that it was lost in the shuffle for Morgan was soon investigating modal-oriented tunes. Despite its neglect, this is a fine session that Lee Morgan and hard bop fans will want. ---Scott Yanow, AllMusic Review

 

On Nov. 19, 1966, Lee Morgan headed out to Englewood Cliffs, N.J., and Rudy Van Gelder's recording studio with tenor saxophonist Hank Mobley, pianist Cedar Walton, bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Billy Higgins. When they arrived, the quintet recorded what I consider to be a perfect album. The songs were beautifully selected, the material was well rehearsed and the playing was pure bliss by all five musicians. Once they were done, Blue Note decided to shelve the album.

Why the album wasn't released in '66 remains a mystery. The good news for us is that re-issue producer Michael Cuscuna discovered the tape reels in the Blue Note vaults in 1984 and released the album the following year. Possible reasons why Blue Note would put the brakes on such a wonderful album include too many Blue Note albums coming out at the same time, a desire to release a different Morgan album instead, a conflict with one of Blue Note's other artists releasing an album, the group's inability to tour to promote the album, a failure to get rights clearance on one of the standards or a sonic flaw in a track that needed a re-take that the group didn't have time to correct at a later date. Or it was planned, delayed and then forgotten. And there are probably another 10 reasons that haven't been mentioned here.

What we do know is that The Rajah was released 12 years after Morgan was gunned down in 1972 by his common-law wife Helen at Slug's Saloon on East 3rd St. in New York. A blizzard had prevented the ambulance from arriving quickly, and Morgan bled to death. He was 33.

The Rajah features a relaxed, sophisticated sound with a laid-back, pulse-paced feel. Many of the songs have a light Latin rhythm that was in sync with the bossa nova craze of the day. The song lineup was Calvin Massey's A Pilgrim's Funny Farm, Morgan's The Rajah, Duke Pearson's Is That So?, Walter Davis's Davisamba and two standards—What Now My Love and Once In a Lifetime. Mobley is particularly sensual here, sailing through these calm waters like an early-morning tug while Morgan's horn is lyrical, bright and embracing. Walton on piano is exceptional, particularly with Chambers' thick bass and Higgins' gentle hard-bop rhythms.

I never tire of hearing this album. Michael Cuscuna tells me the following: "I have no idea why this album wasn't released. Lee was prolific, and a lot got left in the can, including a number of titles even better than this one. Alfred [Lion] never had a clear memory of why some things came out and some got left behind." ---Marc Myers, jazzwax.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Lee Morgan Mon, 13 Feb 2017 15:23:09 +0000
Lee Morgan - The Rumproller (1965) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/1145-lee-morgan/3783-lee-morgan-the-rumproller-1965.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/1145-lee-morgan/3783-lee-morgan-the-rumproller-1965.html Lee Morgan - The Rumproller (1965)

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1. The Rumproller
2. Desert Moonlight
3. Eclipso
4. Edda
5. The Lady
6. Venus Di Mildrew

Personnel:
Lee Morgan (trumpet);
Joe Henderson (tenor saxophone);
Ronnie Mathews (piano);
Victor Sproles (bass);
Billy Higgins (drums).

 

To follow up on his unexpected boogaloo hit "The Sidewinder," Lee Morgan recorded Andrew Hill's somewhat similar "The Rumproller" but this time the commercial magic was not there. However the trumpeter, tenor-saxophonist Joe Henderson, pianist Ronnie Mathews, bassist Victor Sproles and drummer Billy Higgins all play quite well on the title cut, two of Morgan's songs (the bossa nova "Eclipso" is somewhat memorable), a ballad tribute to Billie Holiday and Wayne Shorter's "Edda." This album is worth picking up but it is not essential. ---Scott Yanow, All Music Guide

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Lee Morgan Sun, 07 Mar 2010 13:23:04 +0000
Lee Morgan - The Sidewinder (1963) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/1145-lee-morgan/3252-lee-morgan-the-sidewinder.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/1145-lee-morgan/3252-lee-morgan-the-sidewinder.html Lee Morgan - The Sidewinder (1963)

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1. The Sidewinder
2. Totem Pole
3. Gary’s Notebook
4. Boy, What a Night
5. Hocus Pocus
6. Totem Pole (alternate take)
Musicians: Lee Morgan – trumpet Barry Harris – piano Joe Henderson – sax (tenor) Bob Cranshaw – bass Billy Higgins- drums

 

Carried by its almost impossibly infectious eponymous opening track, The Sidewinder helped foreshadow the sounds of boogaloo and soul-jazz with its healthy R&B influence and Latin tinge. While the rest of the album retreats to a more conventional hard bop sound, Morgan's compositions are forward-thinking and universally solid. Only 25 at the time of its release, Morgan was accomplished (and perhaps cocky) enough to speak of mentoring the great Joe Henderson, who at 26 was just beginning to play dates with Blue Note after getting out of the military. Henderson makes a major contribution to the album, especially on "Totem Pole," where his solos showed off his singular style, threatening to upstage Morgan, who is also fairly impressive here. Barry Harris, Bob Cranshaw, and Billy Higgins are all in good form throughout the album as well, and the group works together seamlessly to create an album that crackles with energy while maintaining a stylish flow. --- Stacia Proefrock, allmusic.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Lee Morgan Thu, 28 Jan 2010 18:36:36 +0000
Lee Morgan and Wayne Shorter - The Complete Shorter Sessions (2000) (6CD Box Set) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/1145-lee-morgan/11436-lee-morgan-and-wayne-shorter-the-complete-shorter-sessions-2000-6cd-box-set.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/1145-lee-morgan/11436-lee-morgan-and-wayne-shorter-the-complete-shorter-sessions-2000-6cd-box-set.html Lee Morgan and Wayne Shorter - The Complete Shorter Sessions (2000) (6CD Box Set)

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Disc 1:
01. Seeds of Sin - The Young Lions
02. Seeds of Sin [A] [Version] - The Young Lions
03. Scourin' - The Young Lions
04. Scourin' [A] [Version] - The Young Lions
05. Fat Lady - The Young Lions
06. Fat Lady [A] [Version] - The Young Lions				CD1  
07. Peaches and Cream [A] [Version] - The Young Lions
08. That's Right [A] [Version] - The Young Lions
09. Running Brook - Lee Morgan
10. Terrible "T" - Lee Morgan

Disc 2:
01. Mogie - Lee Morgan
02. Mogie - Lee Morgan
03. Mogie - Lee Morgan
04. Off Spring - Lee Morgan
05. Off Spring [Edit] - Lee Morgan
06. Bess - Lee Morgan
07. Bess - Lee Morgan
08. Running Brook - Lee Morgan
09. Running Brook - Lee Morgan
10. Terrible "T" - Lee Morgan
11. Terrible "T" - Lee Morgan

Disc 3:
01. I'm a Fool to Want You - Lee Morgan
02. I'm a Fool to Want You - Lee Morgan
03. I'm a Fool to Want You - Lee Morgan
04. Expoobident - Lee Morgan
05. Expoobident - Lee Morgan
06. Fire - Lee Morgan
07. Fire - Lee Morgan
08. Just in Time - Lee Morgan
09. Just in Time - Lee Morgan					CD1  
10. Triple Track - Lee Morgan
11. Triple Track - Lee Morgan
12. Easy Living - Lee Morgan
13. The Hearing - Lee Morgan
14. Lost and Found - Lee Morgan

Disc 4:
01. Blues a la Carte - Wayne Shorter
02. Blues a la Carte - Wayne Shorter
03. Harry's Last Stand - Wayne Shorter
04. Harry's Last Stand - Wayne Shorter
05. Down in the Depths - Wayne Shorter
06. Down in the Depths - Wayne Shorter
07. Pug Nose - Wayne Shorter
08. Pug Nose - Wayne Shorter
09. Black Diamond - Wayne Shorter
10. Black Diamond - Wayne Shorter
11. Mack the Knife - Wayne Shorter

Disc 5:
01. The Ruby and the Pearl - Wayne Shorter
02. The Ruby and the Pearl - Wayne Shorter
03. Pay as You Go - Wayne Shorter
04. Second Genesis - Wayne Shorter
05. Mr. Chairman - Wayne Shorter
06. Mr. Chairman - Wayne Shorter						CD1  
07. Tenderfoot - Wayne Shorter
08. Tenderfoot - Wayne Shorter
09. The Albatross - Wayne Shorter
10. The Albtross - Wayne Shorter
11. Getting to Know You [Alternate Take] - Wayne Shorter
12. Getting to Know You - Wayne Shorter
13. I Didn't Know What Time It Was - Wayne Shorter

Disc 6:
01. Black Orpheus [Alternate Take] - Wayne Shorter
02. Black Orpheus - Wayne Shorter
03. Dead End [Alternate Take] - Wayne Shorter
04. Dead End [Alternate Take] - Wayne Shorter
05. Dead End - Wayne Shorter
06. All or Nothing at All [Alternate Take] - Wayne Shorter
07. All or Nothing at All - Wayne Shorter
08. Calloway Went That-A-Way [Alternate Take] - Wayne Shorter
09. Calloway Went That-A-Way - Wayne Shorter
10. Wayning Moments [First Alternate Take] - Wayne Shorter
11. Wayning Moments - Wayne Shorter
12. Wayning Moments [Second Alternate Take] - Wayne Shorter
13. Moon of Manakoora [Alternate Take] - Wayne Shorter
14. Moon of Manakoora - Wayne Shorter
15. Powder Keg [Alternate Take] - Wayne Shorter
16. Powder Keg - Wayne Shorter
17. Devil's Island [Alternate Take] - Wayne Shorter
18. Devil's Island - Wayne Shorter

Personnel:
Jymie Merritt - Bass
Eddie Higgins - Piano
Art Blakey - Drums
Wayne Shorter - Sax (Tenor)
Bob Cranshaw - Bass
Art Davis - Bass
Marshall Thompson - Drums
Wynton Kelly - Piano
Bobby Timmons - Piano
Cedar Walton - Piano
Jimmy Cobb - Drums
Lee Morgan - Main Performer, Trumpet
Louis Hayes - Drums
Freddie Hubbard - Trumpet

 

Mosaic Records continues to repackage and remaster previously released and unreleased material by jazz legends past and present. Here, the ongoing saga continues with this sharply produced set featuring trumpeter Lee Morgan and saxophonist Wayne Shorter's recordings for the now defunct, Chicago, IL-based Vee-Jay recording label. With this six-CD compilation, the listener will find meticulously detailed annotations of the story behind Vee-Jay, chronological accounts of the musicians' backgrounds and basically what was transpiring during 1959 and 1961, which denotes the time frame of these sessions. The producers also provide an album index of the original recordings and a reference matrix of the personnel on a per-disc basis. And while Morgan was a rising star who had already released six LPs as a leader for Blue Note records, these works represent Shorter's initial dates as a leader. Here we find Morgan manning a front-line attack with either Shorter performing on tenor sax or his collaborations with alto saxophonist Frank Strozier, drummers Art Blakey, and Louis Hayes, pianist Bobby Timmons, and many others of note who appear throughout the entire scope of these discs.

Basically, the music is formulated from within the hard bop vein amid a number of medium-tempo and hard-swinging motifs, ballads, and alternate takes. Shorter proceeded to record a number of exceptional LPs for Blue Note Records, whereas, his already shining star had rapidly risen thanks to his affiliation with Miles Davis and collaboration with keyboardist Joe Zawinul in the pioneering fusion band Weather Report. Meanwhile, Morgan was viewed upon as being the logical successor to trumpeter Clifford Brown as he surged onward to record several timeless classics prior to his tragic death in 1972. Hence, this presentation supplies additional evidence to their everlasting influences as you are treated to Morgan's fluent lines, subtle inflections, radiant lyricism, and Shorter's sinewy attack, penetrating extended notes and optimal utilization of space.

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CD1 - CD3

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CD4 - CD6

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Lee Morgan Thu, 19 Jan 2012 09:44:40 +0000
Lee Morgan with Hank Mobley's Quintet - Introducing Lee Morgan (1956) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/1145-lee-morgan/26684-lee-morgan-with-hank-mobleys-quintet-introducing-lee-morgan-1956.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/1145-lee-morgan/26684-lee-morgan-with-hank-mobleys-quintet-introducing-lee-morgan-1956.html Lee Morgan with Hank Mobley's Quintet - Introducing Lee Morgan (1956)

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A1 Hank's Shout 7:00
A2 Nostalgia 8:47
B1 Bet 7:50
B2 Softly As In A Morning Sunrise 2:29
B3 P.S. I Love You 4:22
B4 Easy Living 2:49
B5 That's All 2:44 

Bass – Doug Watkins
Drums – Art Taylor
Piano – Hank Jones
Tenor Saxophone – Hank Mobley
Trumpet – Lee Morgan

 

Originally a Hank Mobley session, this is one of trumpeter Lee Morgan's earliest recordings. At the time Morgan (who was just 18) was very much under the musical influence of Clifford Brown although a bit of his own personality was starting to shine through. With the fine tenor of Mobley, pianist Hank Jones, bassist Doug Watkins and drummer Art Taylor, Morgan sounds quite comfortable playing bebop and participating in a ballad medley. This set (along with a previously unissued version of "Nostalgia") was later reissued as A-1 -- The Savoy Sessions. ---Scott Yanow, allmusic.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever (Bogdan Marszałkowski)) Lee Morgan Mon, 15 Mar 2021 09:40:36 +0000