Jazz The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz.html Thu, 21 Mar 2019 01:07:50 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Joni Mitchell - Shadows and Light (1980) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/4674-joni-mitchell/17429--joni-mitchell-shadows-and-light-1980-.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/4674-joni-mitchell/17429--joni-mitchell-shadows-and-light-1980-.html Joni Mitchell - Shadows and Light (1980)

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1. In France They Kiss On Main Street
2. Edith And The King Pin
3. Coyote			play
4. Free Man In Paris
5. Goodbye Pork Pie Hat
6. Jaco's Solo
7. The High And The Mighty
8. Third Stone From The Sun
9. Dry Cleaner From Des Moines
10. Amelia
11. Hejira
12. Black Crow
13. Furry Sings The Blues	play
14. Raised On Robbery
15. Why Do Fools Fall In Love
16. Shadows And Lights

Line-Up:
Joni Mitchell - electric guitar, vocals
Pat Metheny - lead guitar
Jaco Pastorius - bass
Don Alias - drums
Lyle Mays - keyboards
Michael Brecker - saxophone
The Persuasions - backing vocals 

 

Joni Mitchell's 1970s and '80s forays into jazzier territory may have distressed her folkie faithful, but they also resulted in some uncompromising, challenging, and, yes, entertaining music. Witness this 73-minute document from her '79 tour, which finds her backed by her greatest band ever, including guitarist Pat Metheny and the extraordinary bassist Jaco Pastorius, as well as Metheny cohort Lyle Mays (keyboards), Michael Brecker (sax), and Don Alias (drums). Mitchell's The Hissing of Summer Lawns-Hejira-Mingus period is heavily favored; there are two tunes from Court and Spark, but nothing earlier. It's not perfect--the film clips edited into the live tracks (at Mitchell's direction) are an annoying distraction (Rebel Without a Cause? Huh?). But by the time Mitchell, Mays, and vocal group the Persuasions finish a spine-tingling version of the title song, you'll have witnessed something special--and historic, as this was the only time this stellar crew toured together. --Sam Graham

 

Although this incredible live unit never recorded a proper studio album we do have this as a reminder of just what is possible. Joni the folkie briefly became Ms. Mitchell the jazz singer, supported by the formidable talents of Pat Metheny, Lyle Mays, Jaco Pastorius, Michael Brecker and Don Alias. Many of Mitchell's jazz flirtations are given the full treatment with musicians who understood both her and the genre. It is a staggering marriage of talents and wholly successful. There are even obligatory bonus solos from Pat and Don. They should have stayed together for at least another album.

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Joni Mitchell Sun, 08 Mar 2015 14:24:13 +0000
Les Brown And His Band Of Renown - Revolution In Sound (1962) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/1432-les-brown/22312--les-brown-and-his-band-of-renown-revolution-in-sound-1962.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/1432-les-brown/22312--les-brown-and-his-band-of-renown-revolution-in-sound-1962.html  

Les Brown And His Band Of Renown - Revolution In Sound (1962)

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01. This Could Be The Start Of Something (1:27)
02. Patricia (2:30)
03. The Man With The Golden Arm (2:02)
04. Unchained Melody (2:51)
05. Stompin' At The Savoy (2:35)
06. Lisbon Antigua (2:47)
07. Peter Gunn (2:42)
08. One O'Clock Jump (2:35)
09. Man With A Horn (3:03)
10. Calcutta (2:32)
11. Music Makers (2:54)
12. The Song From Moulin Rouge (2:21)
13. Tea For Two Cha Cha (2:34)
14. Little Brown Jug (2:26)

Alto Saxophone [1st] – Fred Haller
Alto Saxophone [3rd] – Frank Perry
Baritone Saxophone – Butch Stone
Bass – Don Bagley
Bass Trombone – Stumpy Brown
Celesta – Terry Trotter
Cello – Eleanor Slatkin, Jesse Ehrlich 
Drums – Bob Neel
Flute – Fred Haller
Guitar – Herb Elli), Tony Rizzi
Percussion – Gene Estes 
Piano – Terry Trotter
Tenor Saxophone [1st] – Johnny Newsome
Tenor Saxophone [2nd] – Abe Aaron
Timbales – Leobardo O. Acosta 
Trombone [1st] – Roy Main
Trombone [2nd] – John Wanner
Trombone [3rd] – J. Hill
Trumpet – Bill Mattison, Bobby Clark, Dick Collins, John Audino,
 Mickey McMahon, Ollie Mitchell, Uan Rasey
Tuba – Stumpy Brown
Viola – Alexander Neiman, Stan Harris
Violin – Amerigo R. Marino, Darrel Terwilliger, Felix Slatkin, Gerald Vinci,
 Jacques Gasselin, James Getzoff, John P. De Voogdt, Lou Klass, Mischa Russell

 

This was an interesting (if not wholly successful) concept album in its time -- utilizing stereo and some studio trickery, Les Brown and his band essentially emulate the kind of dance band showcase that one would have experienced in the 1930s, with a revolving bandstand. The result is that a piece fades as the platform "revolves" and the next outfit comes up, with its selection. It's hokey and silly, but it was something different in the use of stereo circa 1962, when such details mattered to a lot of potential record buyers. And the juxtaposing of pieces such as "The Man with the Golden Arm," "Unchained Melody," "Stompin' at the Savoy," and "One O'Clock Jump" allows Brown and company to show off their range (and that of the arrangers) to great effect, and the hi-fi sound is still mighty impressive. --- Bruce Eder, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Les Brown Thu, 28 Sep 2017 13:09:36 +0000
100 Soul Jazz (2016) CD1 http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/5512-100-soul-jazz/20540-100-soul-jazz-2016-cd1.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/5512-100-soul-jazz/20540-100-soul-jazz-2016-cd1.html 100 Soul Jazz (2016) CD1

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01. Herbie Hancock — Cantaloupe Island (05:29)
02. Marlena Shaw — California Soul (02:57)
03. James Brown — Papa's Got a Brand New Bag (04:38)
04. Roy Ayers Ubiquity — Everybody Loves the Sunshine (04:01)
05. Lee Morgan — The Sidewinder (10:27)
06. Marlena Shaw — Woman of the Ghetto (06:02)
07. Cannonball Adderley — Big City (Live) (Remastered) [Live] (03:20)
08. Nina Simone — I Put a Spell on You (02:38)
09. Grant Green — Cantaloupe Woman (Remastered) (05:32)
10. Ramsey Lewis Trio — Wade In the Water (03:29)
11. Ronnie Laws — Fever (03:30)
12. Willie Bobo — Evil Ways (02:39)
13. Etta James — A Sunday Kind of Love (03:16)
14. George Benson — Bluesadelic (04:16)
15. Al Jarreau — Cold Duck (03:45)
16. The J.B.'s — Use Me (03:48)
17. Eddie Henderson — Inside You (04:52)
18. Quincy Jones — What's Goin' on (09:53)
19. Lonnie Smith — Seesaw (Remastered) (05:54)
20. Hank Mobley — Recado Bossa Nova (08:13)

 

Soul-Jazz, which was the most popular jazz style of the 1960s, differs from bebop and hard bop (from which it originally developed) in that the emphasis is on the rhythmic groove. Although soloists follow the chords as in bop, the basslines (often played by an organist if not a string bassist) dance rather than stick strictly to a four-to-the bar walking pattern. The musicians build their accompaniment around the bassline and, although there are often strong melodies, it is the catchiness of the groove and the amount of heat generated by the soloists that determine whether the performance is successful. Soul-jazz's roots trace back to pianist Horace Silver, whose funky style infused bop with the influence of church and gospel music, along with the blues. Other pianists who followed and used similar approaches were Bobby Timmons, Junior Mance, Les McCann, Gene Harris (with his Three Sounds), and Ramsey Lewis. With the emergence of organist Jimmy Smith in 1956 (who has dominated his instrument ever since), soul-jazz organ combos (usually also including a tenor, guitarist, drummer, and an occasional bassist) caught on, and soulful players became stars, including Brother Jack McDuff, Shirley Scott, Jimmy McGriff, Charles Earland, and Richard "Groove" Holmes, along with such other musicians as guitarists Grant Green, George Benson and Kenny Burrell; tenors Stanley Turrentine, Willis "Gator" Jackson, Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis, David "Fathead" Newman, Gene "Jug" Ammons, Houston Person, Jimmy Forrest, King Curtis, Red Holloway, and Eddie Harris; and altoist Hank Crawford. Despite its eclipse by fusion and synthesizers in the 1970s, soul-jazz has stayed alive and made a healthy comeback in recent years. ---Rovi

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) 100 Soul Jazz Fri, 21 Oct 2016 14:48:14 +0000
100 Soul Jazz (2016) CD2 http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/5512-100-soul-jazz/20560-100-soul-jazz-2016-cd2.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/5512-100-soul-jazz/20560-100-soul-jazz-2016-cd2.html 100 Soul Jazz (2016) CD2

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21. Buddy Rich — Wack Wack (Live) (Remix) [Live] (03:17)
22. Grant Green — Walk In the Night (Live) (06:37)
23. Nina Simone — Sinnerman (10:23)
24. Chet Baker — Spinning Wheel (03:17)
25. Lee Morgan — Cornbread (09:03)
26. Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers — Dat Dere (08:48)
27. Ronnie Laws — Tidal Wave (04:13)
28. Wes Montgomery — California Dreaming (03:05)
29. The Jazz Crusaders — Hard Times (03:02)
30. George Duke & George Howard — One Last Time (05:11)
31. The Cannonball Adderley Quintet — Sticks (Live) (Remix) [Live] (03:55)
32. Candido Camero — Candido's Camera (04:06)
33. Gene Harris & The Three Sounds — Sittin' Duck (09:16)
34. Etta James — At Last (02:59)
35. Gene Harris & The Three Sounds — African Sweets (04:29)
36. Donald Byrd — Street Lady (05:40)
37. George Benson — I Got a Woman (04:59)
38. Roy Ayers — Hummin' In the Sun (03:45)
39. Gene Harris & The Three Sounds — Get Back (Live) (Remastered) (02:44)
40. Booker T. & The M.G.'s — Winter Wonderland (02:07)

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) 100 Soul Jazz Tue, 25 Oct 2016 15:40:05 +0000
100 Soul Jazz (2016) CD3 http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/5512-100-soul-jazz/20601-100-soul-jazz-2016-cd3-.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/5512-100-soul-jazz/20601-100-soul-jazz-2016-cd3-.html 100 Soul Jazz (2016) CD3

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41. Cal Tjader & Eddie Palmieri — Picadillo (07:04)
43. Al Jarreau — In My Music (04:06)
43. Grant Green — Ain't It Funky Now (09:58)
44. Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers — Moanin' (09:38)
45. Terry Callier — People Get Ready / Brotherly Love (06:49)
46. Grant Green — The Final Comedown (03:27)
47. Buddy Rich Big Band — Big Mama Cass (Live) (03:23)
48. Count Basie — Watermelon Man (03:11)
49. Ramsey Lewis Trio — A Hard Day's Night (04:58)
50. Cal Tjader — Doxy (04:19)
51. Cal Tjader — Ritmo Uni (03:51)
52. James Brown — Cold Sweat (05:03)
53. Grant Green — Sookie Sookie (Cliche Lounge (Live) (11:00)
54. Bobby Hutcherson — Ummh (07:49)
55. Trombone Shorty — In the 6Th (03:16)
56. Roy Ayers Ubiquity — Running Away (06:54)
57. Les McCann — Green, Green Rocky Road (02:45)
58. Pat Martino — Four on Six (06:02)
59. Donald Byrd — (Fallin' Like) Dominoes (Remastered) (04:33)
60. Grant Green — California Green (Remastered) (06:22)
61. Al Jarreau — Scootcha-Booty (04:26)

 

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) 100 Soul Jazz Wed, 02 Nov 2016 16:30:34 +0000
100 Soul Jazz (2016) CD4 http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/5512-100-soul-jazz/20621-100-soul-jazz-2016-cd4.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/5512-100-soul-jazz/20621-100-soul-jazz-2016-cd4.html 100 Soul Jazz (2016) CD4

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61. Al Jarreau — Scootcha-Booty (04:26)
62. Herbie Hancock — Edith and the Kingpin (feat. Tina Turner) (06:32)
63. Willie Bobo — Sunny (02:45)
64. Buddy Rich — The Nitty Gritty (Live) (Remixed & Remastered) [Live] (04:08)
65. Lonnie Smith — Slouchin' (Remastered) (06:53)
66. Nina Simone — Take Care of Business (02:04)
67. Wes Montgomery — O Morro Nao Tem Vez (04:45)
68. Quincy Jones — Superstition (04:31)
69. Chet Baker — Love For Sale (13:04)
70. Hank Mobley — The Dip (07:57)
71. Roy Ayers Ubiquity — I Still Love You (04:12)
72. The Cannonball Adderley Quintet — Hummin' (Live) (06:36)
73. Grant Green — The Windjammer (05:38)
74. Cal Tjader — Soul Sauce (02:25)
75. Hank Mobley — Barrel of Funk (Remastered) (11:14)
76. Donald Byrd — Witch Hunt (09:43)
77. Nina Simone — Work Song (03:04)
78. Buddy Rich Big Band — Soul Kitchen (Live) (Remastered) [Live] (03:58)
79. Bobby Hutcherson — Goin' Down South (07:10)
80. Willie Bobo — Fried Neck Bones and some Homefries (03:01)

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) 100 Soul Jazz Sun, 06 Nov 2016 15:28:56 +0000
100 Soul Jazz (2016) CD5 http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/5512-100-soul-jazz/20651-100-soul-jazz-2016-cd5.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/5512-100-soul-jazz/20651-100-soul-jazz-2016-cd5.html 100 Soul Jazz (2016) CD5

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81. Lonnie Smith — Play It Back (09:36)
82. The Cannonball Adderley Quintet — Sack O' Woe (Live) (10:45)
83. George Benson — Thunder Walk (04:42)
84. Terry Callier — Do You Finally Need a Friend (05:45)
85. Chet Baker — Vehicle (02:44)
86. Donald Byrd — Black Byrd (07:20)
87. Ramsey Lewis — Spanish Grease (03:12)
88. Wes Montgomery & Jimmy Smith — Ogd (05:15)
89. James Brown — I Got You (I Feel Good) (02:47)
90. Eddie Henderson — Dr. Mganga (07:32)
91. Candido Camero, Grady Tate, Herbie Hancock, Kenny Burrell, Ron Carter & Stanley Turrentine — Bossa (Canto G Bossa) (08:00)
92. Blue Mitchell — Hi-Heel Sneakers (Remastered) (08:25)
93. Horace Silver — Sister Sadie (06:19)
94. Nina Simone — The Gal from Joe's (02:43)
95. The Jazz Crusaders — Jackson! (02:44)
96. Candido Camero — Broadway (04:10)
97. Fred Wesley & The J.B.'s — Watermelon Man (03:28)
98. Al Jarreau — Last Night (03:48)
99. Les McCann — Sad Little Girl (02:54)
100. Roy Ayers Ubiquity — Vibrations (03:06)

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) 100 Soul Jazz Sat, 12 Nov 2016 14:11:17 +0000
100 Years of Jazz - Disc 02: New Orleans/Chicago/New York (1999) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/6381-100-years-of-jazz/24355-100-years-of-jazz-disc-02-new-orleanschicagonew-york-1999.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/6381-100-years-of-jazz/24355-100-years-of-jazz-disc-02-new-orleanschicagonew-york-1999.html 100 Years of Jazz - Disc 02: New Orleans/Chicago/New York (1999)

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1. King Oliver's Creole Jazz Band – Chimes Blues (02:54)
2. Celestin's Original Tuxedo Jazz Orchestra – Station Calls (02:53)
3. Jelly Roll Morton, Johnny Dodds, Blind Blake & Jimmy Bertrand – South Bound Rag (03:19)
4. Freddie Keppard – Salty Dog (02:47)
5. Clarence Williams’ Blue Five – Wild Cat Blues (03:02)
6. Tommy Ladnier & Lovie Austin's Blues Serenaders – Travelling Blues (02:40)
7. Louis Armstrong and His Hot Five – West End Blues (03:11)
8. Louis Armstrong & Earl Hines – Weather Bird (02:43)
9. Piron's New Orleans Orchestra – Bouncing Around (02:45)
10. Jesse Stone and His Blues Serenaders – Starvation Blues (03:20)
11. King Oliver and His Dixie Syncopators – Tin Roof Blues (02:55)
12. Jelly Roll Morton Trio – Mr. Jelly Lord (02:52)
13. Jelly Roll Morton's Red Hot Peppers – Someday Sweetheart Blues (03:31)
14. Jimmie Noone & His Orchestra – Bump It (03:23)
15. Clarence Williams and His Orchestra – Long Deep and Wide (02:56)
16. Bertha "Chippie" Hill, Shirley Clay & Artie Starks – Trouble in Mind Blues (03:10)
17. Bessie Smith, Louis Armstrong, Charlie Green & Fletcher Henderson – Careless Love Blues (03:27)
18. Jelly Roll Morton – Mamie's Blues (03:17)
19. Pinetop Smith – Pinetop's Boogie Woogie (03:21)
20. The Washingtonians – East St. Louis Toodle-Oo (03:06)

 

When W. C. Handy, then living in Memphis, was invited to bring a 12-piece band to New York to record for Columbia, he could find only four musicians willing to make the trip. He traveled to Chicago to fill the remaining spots, but encountered hesitancy and suspicion there, too. “Like Memphians, Chicago musicians had never heard of a colored band traveling to and from New York to make records,” he later recalled. When Freddie Keppard had a chance to make the first jazz recordings for Victor in 1916, he also expressed reservations, but for a different reason. “Nothin’ doin’ boys,” he told his bandmates. “We won’t put our stuff on records for everybody to steal.”

Meantime, jazz was taking Chicago by storm. The greatest talents in New Orleans jazz set up shop in the Windy City during the years following World War I. Sidney Bechet moved to Chicago in 1917. Jelly Roll Morton had visited Chicago in 1914 and would later return for a long stay—the city served as his home base when he made his most important recordings in the 1920s. King Oliver first found widespread acclaim as a Chicago bandleader during that same period, and Louis Armstrong first came to public attention as a member of Oliver’s ensemble, while it was performing in Chicago.

Why did jazz ever leave New Orleans? Today, that city still tries to build tourism claims around its jazz heritage, but all the boasting and brochures can’t hide the fact that New Orleans’s jazz scene has been declining for almost 100 years. In 1918, Columbia Records tried to seize the momentum of the first jazz records by sending talent scout Ralph Peer to the Big Easy in search of recording acts, but Peer shocked the home office with his telegram after three weeks on the job: NO JAZZ BANDS IN NEW ORLEANS.

That was a slight exaggeration. A few outstanding jazz players still made their homes in New Orleans. Check out the music that trumpeter Sam Morgan later recorded for Columbia, which testifies to the homegrown talent that stayed in the Crescent City. Nonetheless, the most famous jazz musicians from New Orleans had already left home by the time the public started talking about the “Jazz Age,” and the city wouldn’t come to the forefront of the idiom again until the rise of Wynton Marsalis and others in the 1980s.

The usual reason given for the departure of the first generation of New Orleans talent is the closure of the city’s red-light district in 1917. Without brothels, the story goes, jazz musicians had no place to play. The real history is more complex. True, many musicians did lose gigs as a result of the navy’s determination to clean up New Orleans, but other factors contributed to this exodus, from the influenza epidemic that ravaged the city to sheer wanderlust. But the biggest reason jazz musicians had for moving to Chicago was the simple desire to escape the institutionalized racism of the South and find better economic opportunities. A half-million African-Americans eventually relocated from Southern states to Chicago—musicians, along with everyone else.

New York also saw its black population grow during this period, but its most significant contribution to the jazz idiom in the early 1920s came mainly from local talent. The first native New York jazz style was “Harlem stride,” a rambunctious piano music. The name refers to the striding motion of the performer’s left hand, which dances back and forth from the bottom of the keyboard to the middle register on every beat, as well as to the New York neighborhood where this performance style flourished.

New York native Thomas “Fats” Waller probably did more than anyone to prove that the city didn’t always need to import its jazz talent. He was the most famous of the Harlem stride players, but a host of other brilliant keyboardists—including James P. Johnson, Willie “The Lion” Smith, Donald Lambert, Luckey Roberts, and Art Tatum—were also major contributors to the movement. With the exception of Tatum, all these musicians were born in the Northeast.

I suspect that Duke Ellington’s decision to move from Washington, D.C., to Harlem in the early 1920s—in retrospect, a turning point in jazz history—was spurred by the vibrancy of the local piano tradition. At that juncture, Chicago still would have been the favored destination for most aspiring jazz talents, but as a professional pianist immersed in the stride tradition, Ellington had different priorities. ---Ted Gioia, city-journal.org

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) 100 Years of Jazz Sat, 10 Nov 2018 08:55:08 +0000
100 Years of Jazz - Disc 03: White Bands - Chicago - Dixieland (1999) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/6381-100-years-of-jazz/24387-100-years-of-jazz-disc-03-white-bands-chicago-dixieland-1999.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/6381-100-years-of-jazz/24387-100-years-of-jazz-disc-03-white-bands-chicago-dixieland-1999.html 100 Years of Jazz - Disc 03: White Bands - Chicago - Dixieland (1999)

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1. New Orleans Rhythm Kings – Weary Blues (02:49)
2. Bix Beiderbecke & Frankie Trumbauer and His Orchestra – Singin' the Blues (03:02)
3. Eddie Lang & His Orchestra – Walkin' the Dog (03:02)
4. Boyd Senter and His Senterpedes – Mobile Blues (03:12)
5. Original Memphis Five – The Great White Way Blues (04:21)
6. Ladd's Black Aces – Aunt Hagar's Children (03:19)
7. Hoagy Carmichael's Collegians – March of the Hoodlums (02:23)
8. Husk O'Hare's Super Orchestra of Chicago – Tiger Rag (02:36)
9. Charles Pierce Orchestra – Bull Frog Blues (02:59)
10. The Bucktown Five – Steady Roll Blues (02:36)
11. Joe Venuti's Blue Four – The Wild Dog (02:42)
12. Blind Willie Dunn's Gin Bottle Four – Jet Black Blues (03:04)
13. Gene Gifford and His Orchestra – Nothin' but the Blues (03:15)
14. Red McKenzie and the Mound City Blue Blowers – If I Could Be With You One Hour Tonight (03:24)
15. Wingy Manone and His Orchestra – Bouncin' in Rhythm (02:46)
16. Bud Freeman & His Summa Cum Laude Orchestra – I've Found a New Baby (02:42)
17. Eddie Condon and His Windy City Seven – Love Is Just Around the Corner (03:05)
18. Bud Freeman Trio – Swingin' Without Mezz (03:08)
19. Benny Goodman and His Boys – Wolverine Blues (02:51)
20. The Benny Goodman Trio – That's a Plenty (02:49)
21. Bix Beiderbecke – In a Mist (Bixology) (02:44)

 

Dixieland, in music, a style of jazz, often ascribed to jazz pioneers in New Orleans, La., but also descriptive of styles honed by slightly later Chicago-area musicians. The term also refers to the traditional jazz that underwent a popular revival during the 1940s and that continued to be played into the 21st century.

Chicago style, approach to jazz group instrumental playing that developed in Chicago during the 1920s and moved to New York City in the ’30s, being preserved in the music known as Dixieland. Much of it was originally produced by trumpeter Jimmy McPartland, tenor saxophonist Bud Freeman, clarinetist Frank Teschemacher, and their colleagues in imitation of the New Orleans Rhythm Kings (originally the Friar’s Society Orchestra, including Leon Rappolo, Paul Mares, George Brunis, and others), a white New Orleans band playing at Chicago’s Friar’s Society.

Though much like New Orleans style, Chicago style can sometimes be differentiated by its greater emphasis on individual solos, a less relaxed feeling, and a somewhat smaller reliance on elements of 19th-century black ethnic music. Comparisons between the two forms are difficult because little New Orleans style was recorded before 1923, by which time both the black and the white New Orleans bands had already been in Chicago long enough to influence each other as well as the Chicago audience; this ruled out the existence of recorded examples illustrating how New Orleans black bands originally differed from New Orleans white bands and how all differed from the native Chicago bands during their 1920s Chicago residence. These styles employed simple accompanying rhythms (often just a chord on each beat by piano, guitar, or banjo, with bass and drums) and improvised counterlines among the melody instruments (trumpet, clarinet, trombone, saxophone, and occasionally violin). Some choruses contained mutual embellishments, whereas most had some sort of solo in the foreground while backgrounds were partly or completely worked out by the musicians who were not soloing. The degree of complexity seems to have depended primarily on the particular interests of the leader. For example, Jelly Roll Morton, a black leader from New Orleans, worked out elaborate arrangements for his Chicago record dates, yet Louis Armstrong, another black New Orleans native, did not. Similarly, some recordings by the Austin High Gang, as McPartland and his fellow white players were often called, are quite elaborate, yet others by them are informal.

For decades, the Chicago style was kept alive through the work of Eddie Condon. ---britannica.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) 100 Years of Jazz Fri, 16 Nov 2018 14:04:49 +0000
100 Years of Jazz - Disc 04: Swing - Kansas City (1999) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/6381-100-years-of-jazz/24432-100-years-of-jazz-disc-04-swing-kansas-city-1999.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/jazz/6381-100-years-of-jazz/24432-100-years-of-jazz-disc-04-swing-kansas-city-1999.html 100 Years of Jazz - Disc 04: Swing - Kansas City (1999)

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1. Chick Webb and His Orchestra – Liza (All Clouds Roll Away) (02:50)
2. Ella Fitzgerald & Chick Webb – A-Tisket A-Tasket (02:37)
3. Bennie Moten and His Orchestra – Rhumba Negro (Spanish Stomp) (02:50)
4. Jimmie Lunceford and His Orchestra – Rhythm Is Our Business (03:17)
5. Jean Goldkette and His Orchestra – Birmingham Bertha (02:56)
6. McKinney’s Cotton Pickers – I'd Love It (03:06)
7. Fats Waller and His Rhythm – A Good Man Is Hard to Find (02:58)
8. Fats Waller, His Rhythm & His Orchestra – Jitterburg Waltz (03:21)
9. Benny Goodman and His Orchestra – All the Cats Join In (03:12)
10. Gene Krupa and His Orchestra – Let Me Off Uptown (03:04)
11. Luis Russell and His Burning Eight – Savoy Shout (03:00)
12. Count Basie & His Orchestra – Rock-a-Bye Basie (03:04)
13. Count Basie & His Orchestra – Harvard Blues (03:22)
14. Duke Ellington & His Orchestra – Mood Indigo (02:42)
15. Stuff Smith and His Onyx Club Boys – Twilight in Turkey (02:26)
16. Zutty Singleton & his Orchestra – King Porter Stomp (02:36)
17. Eddie Durham and His Band – Moten Swing (02:40)
18. Quintette du Hot Club de France – Minor Swing (03:15)
19. Billie Holiday & Frankie Newton and His Orchestra – Fine and Mellow (03:17)
20. Woody Herman & His Orchestra – Woodshopper's Ball (03:11)
21. Mary Lou Williams and Her Kansas City Seven – Harmony Blues (02:52)

 

Kansas City is world renowned for its rich jazz and blues legacy. Jazz in Kansas City was born in the 1920s and continues today in clubs and events held throughout the city. More than 40 area nightclubs feature jazz on a regular basis.

The roots of Kansas City jazz are quite varied. Blues singers of the 1920s and ragtime music greatly influenced the music scene. Settings such as dance halls, cabarets and speakeasies fostered the development of this new musical style. In the early days, many jazz groups were smaller dance bands with three to six pieces. By the mid-1920s, the big band became the most common. Territory bands also had an influential development on jazz. Many great musicians got their start in these bands, traveling up to 1,000 miles between jobs.

While jazz began in the 1920s with a bang, it flourished in the 1930s, mainly as a result of political boss Tom Pendergast. During prohibition, he allowed alcohol to flow in Kansas City. As an entertainment center, Kansas City had no equal during these dry times.

This "wide-open" town image attracted displaced musicians from everywhere in mid-America. Throughout the Depression, Kansas City bands continued to play while other bands across the nation folded. The city was shielded from the worst of the Depression due to an early form of New Deal-style public works projects that provided jobs, and affluence, that kept the dance-oriented nightlife in town swinging. Only in Kansas City did jazz continue to flourish. At one time, there were more than 100 night clubs, dance halls and vaudeville houses in Kansas City regularly featuring jazz music. Legends like Count Basie, Andy Kirk, Joe Turner, Hot Lips Page and Jay McShann all played in Kansas City. A saxophone player named Charlie Parker began his ascent to fame here in his hometown in the 1930s.

Kansas City’s 12th Street became nationally known for its jazz clubs, gambling parlors and brothels, earning the city the moniker, “The Paris of the Plains.” At its height, 12th Street was home to more than 50 jazz clubs. Just six blocks to the south, jazz also flourished at 18th & Vine, which became nationally respected as the epicenter of the city’s African-American community.

Another great outcome of Kansas City jazz was the jam session. After performances, musicians would get together to exchange ideas and experiment with new methods of playing. The best local and out of town musicians would take part in these jam sessions that lasted all night and well into the next day. ---visitkc.com

 

The Swing genre represents a golden age for jazz that showed its first signs in the mid-20s, but really peaked from the mid-30s to the mid-40s. Going well into the 20s, most jazz bands still played in New Orleans or Dixieland styles in which the musicians all improvised simultaneously while staying within the boundaries of the original tune's melody and harmony.

When cornetist Louis Armstrong joined Fletcher Henderson's Orchestra in 1924, the band's arranger, Don Redman, knew he had a rare talent on his hands and began to spotlight Armstrong's melodic skills. No longer would the entire band improvise, instead Armstrong would be given the freedom to take solos to new heights while the rest of the band supplied supporting riffs. This new approach to band arranging spread and reached the public at a time when people were looking for large orchestral bands that could provide an evening's worth of dance music. Thus the golden age for big band jazz was born.

From 1935 to about 1946 jazz dance bands led by the likes of Benny Goodman and Duke Ellington were the number one form of entertainment in the US. The swing era finally came to an end when new taxation laws on nightclubs made dance floors unprofitable and jazz became an entertainment for listening, not dancing. ---jazzmusicarchives.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) 100 Years of Jazz Sun, 25 Nov 2018 13:42:12 +0000