Classical The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/6436.html Wed, 01 Dec 2021 03:02:27 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Classical Music For Dummies (2010) CD1 - Middle Age, Renaissance, Baroque http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/6436-classical-music-for-dummies/24545-classical-music-for-dummies-2010-cd1-midle-age-renaissance-baroque.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/6436-classical-music-for-dummies/24545-classical-music-for-dummies-2010-cd1-midle-age-renaissance-baroque.html Classical Music For Dummies (2010) CD1 - Middle Age, Renaissance, Baroque

Image could not be displayed. Check browser for compatibility.


01. Chant Gregorien - Puer Natus in Bethleem - Les Moines de Silos
02. Palestrina - Missa Papae Marcelli - Sanctus (extr) - Willcocks,King's - Colege Choir Cambridge
03. Monteverdi - Madrigaux - 8e livre - Hor che'l ciel e la Terra (extr.) - Rooley
04. Lully - Bourgeois genrilhomme - Marche pour la ceremonie des Turcs - Savall
05. Charpentier - Te Deum H. 146 - Prelude - Christie
06. Couperin - Le Tic-toc-choc ou Les Maillotins - Cziffra
07. Rameau - La Poule - Cziffra
08. Pachelbel - Canon - Parrott
09. Purcell - Music for a while - Daniels,Ogden
10. Vivaldi - Gloria RV 589 - Gloria in excelsis Deo - Muti
11. Vivaldi - Mandoline RV 425 - 1er mvt - Allegro - Biondi,Scoramuzzino
12. Vivaldi - 4 Saisons - Printemps RV 269 - 1er mvt Allegro - Biondi
13. Vivaldi - 4 Saisons - Ete RV 315 - 3e mvt - Presto - Biondi
14. Bach - Jesus que ma joie demeure - Choral Cantate BWV 147 - Lipati
15. Bach- Passion selon St-Jean BWV 245 - 1. Herr unser Herrscher (extr) - Parrott
16. Bach - Clavecin bien tempere - Livre I - Prelude en Ut BWV 846 - Zacharias
17. Bach - Suite pour violoncelle 1 BWV 1007 - Prelude - Rostropovich
18. Bach - Brandebourgeois 2 BWV 1047 - 1er mvt - (Allegro) (extr.) - Age of Enlightnment
19. Bach - Clavier 4 BWV 1056 - 2e mvt - Adagio - Fray,Fray
20. Bach - Toccata & Fugue BWV 565 - Toccata - Rogg
21. Bach - Suite 3 BWV 1068 - 2. Air - Ledger
22. Jean-Chretien Bach - Adriano in Siria - Tutti nemeci, e rei - Rhorer,Jaroussky
23. Scarlatti - Sonate en Fam Kk 519 - Pletnev
24. Haendel - Messie HWV 56 - II - 39. Halleluja ! - Parrott,Taverner Choir
25. Haendel - Sarabande HWv 437 - Briger
26. Haendel - Feux d'artifice HWV 351 - 4. La Rejouissance - Menuhin
27. Haendel - Zadok le pretre HWV 258 (extr.) - Andrew Davis
28. Pergolesi - Stabat Mater - Stabat Mater dolorosa - Biondi,Reschman,Daniels

 

Medieval or Gothic (9th to 14th centuries):

Over the years many human endeavours have had the benefit of language. In particular a written language can convey a lot of information about past events, places, people and things. But it is difficult to describe music in words, and even more difficult to specify a tune. It was the development of a standard musical notation in the 11th century that allowed music to be documented in a physical form. Now music could be communicated efficiently, and succeeding generations would know something about the music of their ancestors.

Hildegard von Bingen - from a self-portrait It was the demands of the church that required a musical notation, and so the earliest written music was largely Church Music. The plainchant of this time was still unaccompanied, but new developments were starting to appear. The singing might alternate between two parts for solo singers or choirs, or two parts might be sung together in a style called Organum. In early Organum a second part simply followed the main part at a fixed interval so that the two parts moved in parallel. Later the supporting parts became more independent of the main one and this freedom led to early forms of harmony. Outside of the church's influence, Minstrels and Troubadours were entertaining in the castles of Europe, with music and song a key part of their unwritten repertoire.

Composers from this period were usually monks, and mostly their names were not written down. Among the few names we do know about today are Hildegard von Bingen (a nun and Abbess) and Guillaume de Machaut. Two examples of Gregorian Chant originating from this period are the Dies Irae (Day of Wrath) and the Pange Lingua (Tell Tongue

 

Renaissance (15th and 16th centuries):

The Rennaissance period is well-known as a time of rapid development in all forms of learning and the arts. There was a new self-sustaining freedom of expression which spread throughout much of Europe, and incubated many new ideas and schools of thought. The church was still very powerful and its influence was everywhere, yet the reformation brought a degree of freedom to religious thinking and changes to the demands for music during services. Martin Luther who was a central figure in the German Reformation was himself a composer. He encouraged the use of hymns during services and some hymns which we recognise today were written in this period. A shift in power also meant that the secular needs of the Royal Courts were as important as those of the church in sponsoring new musical material. So as well as music for the Mass, there were Motets and Madrigals setting texts and verse to music, as well as a number of dance forms. Music styles became more complex with multiple parts for different instruments and further developments in harmony. Instruments such as the recorder and lute were common as well as early versions of today's instruments. The creativity of this period was given further impetus by the invention of the printing press which brought standardisation to the previously hand-written forms of musical notation, and allowed many more copies to be made.

Key composers of this period include Thomas Tallis, William Byrd, John Taverner, Josquin des Prez and Giovanni Palestrina.

 

Baroque (1600 - 1750):

In the arts the word Baroque often implies elaborated decorated. This is certainly true of some of the music of the period, but there were also many fundamental changes in its structure. The church's influence continued to decrease, and some composers of the day had a degree of freedom beyond their normal duties of composing for religious and secular occasions. In terms of style, further advances were made in turning the earlier "organum" into the modern harmony of today. Harmony was often indicated by the use of a figured bass to accompany a melody. A figured bass is a baseline with harmonies stated but not fully written out, giving scope for a degree of improvisation.

Instrumental suites consisting of a number of movements based on dances, and concertos created the basis for the classical forms to come. Some preludes and all fugues used multiple independent parts in a technique known as polyphony or counterpoint, and the rise of opera married song and story-telling into a new art form. Replacing the modal system, a new form of keyboard tuning was introduced based on splitting octaves into 12 equal intervals. Called Equal Temperament or Well-Tempered, this enabled different keys to be used without distortion, and it was easier to modulate between keys.

All of these separate developments made this a time of rapid change which laid the foundation for the Classical period to come. Key composers of the Baroque era include Johann Sebastian Bach, George Frideric Handel, Johann Pachelbel, Georg Phillip Telemann, Jean-Philippe Rameau, Henry Purcell, Arcangelo Corelli, Antonio Vivaldi, Domenico Scarlatti, Allesandro Scarlatti, Tomaso Albinoni, Claudio Monteverdi, Marc-Antoine Charpentier and Francois Couperin. ---Jim Paterson, mfiles.co.uk

download (mp3 @320 kbs):

yandex mediafire ulozto gett

 

back

]]>
administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Classical Music For Dummies Mon, 17 Dec 2018 15:01:44 +0000
Classical Music For Dummies (2010) CD2 - Classical Style http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/6436-classical-music-for-dummies/24570-classical-music-for-dummies-2010-cd2-classical-style.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/6436-classical-music-for-dummies/24570-classical-music-for-dummies-2010-cd2-classical-style.html Classical Music For Dummies (2010) CD2 - Classical Style

Image could not be displayed. Check browser for compatibility.


01. Haydn - Trompette 1 - 3e mvt - Finale. Allegro - Muti-Andr?
02. Haydn - Sonate Piano.62 (Hob. XVI-52) - 3e mvt - Finale. Presto (extr.) - Pletnev
03. Boccherini - Quintette op. 11-5 G275 - 3e mvt - Menuet - Biondi
04. Mozart - Piano.21 KV 467 - 2e mvt - Andante - Zinman-Zacharias
05. Mozart - Piano.23 KV 488 - 2e mvt - Adagio - Zinman-Zacharias
06. Mozart - Sonate piano.11 KV 331 - 3e mvt - Alla Turca - Barenboim
07. Mozart - Requiem KV 626 - 7. Dies Irae - Giulini-Philharmonia Chorus
08. Mozart - Requiem KV 626 - 8. Lacrimosa - Giulini-Philharmonia Chorus
09. Mozart - Kleine Nachtmusik KV 525 - 1er mvt - Allegro (extr.) - Marriner
10. Mozart - Symphonie 25 KV 183 - 1er mvt - Allegro con brio - Marriner
11. Mozart - Symphonie 40 KV 550 - 1er mvt - Molto allegro - Marriner
12. Beethoven - Sonate piaNo.14 op. 27-2 Clair de Lune - 1er mvt - Adagio sostenuto - Kovacevich
13. Beethoven - Sonate piaNo.8 op. 13 Pathetique - 2e mvt - Adagio cantabile - Kovacevich
14. Beethoven - Symphonie 5 op. 67 - 1er mvt - Allegro con brio - Rattle
15. Beethoven - Symphonie 7 op. 92 - 2e mvt - Allegretto (extr.) - Rattle
16. Beethoven - Symphonie 9 op. 125 - 4e mvt - Ode a la joie - Rattle-Bonney-Remmert-Streit-Hampson-City of Birmingham Symphony Chorus
17. Beethoven - PiaNo.5 op. 73 Empereur - 2e mvt - Adagio un poco mosso - Vonk-Zacharias

 

Music from the Classical period is distinctive in style from what preceded and followed it. Some of the questions related to performance practice in Renaissance and Baroque music are less complex because at this point in Music history we have much clearer and more explicit indications from the composer concerning the tempo, dynamics, and expressive qualities of the Music under consideration.

Moreover, there have been public performances of this repertoire from the time of its composition to the present. This is both a help and a hindrance in light of the fact that through the last two centuries, certain Romantic conventions have become an accepted part of the performance of this music, and they are not always appropriate to authentic Classical style (this same Problem of inappropriate performance conventions added during the Romantic period exists with Baroque repertoire and, to a lesser extent, music from the Renaissance).

Classical choral music tends to be more homophonic and lighter in texture than that of the Baroque. This lightness needs to pervade the choral lines. There is still rhythmic energy and drive, but without the weightiness of Baroque music.

The lighter quality of Classical music also is derived from its slower harmonic movement. Baroque music, with its emphasis on vertical structure and use of figured bass and basso continuo, is characterized by frequent harmonic changes, sometimes on every beat. Classical music changes chords much less frequently, giving it a more graceful sweep and lightness of phrasing than that created by the pulsating feel of a harpsichordist realizing a Baroque figured bass part, supporting the choral singing with rapidly changing embellished chords. During the Classic period, the keyboard player was no longer typically the composer/ conductor, but instead was simply one of the players in the orchestra. The keyboard part should be much less obtrusive and less highly decorated than that of a Baroque work.

The choral music of the Classic period is generally conservative, and therefore often contains sections of free counterpoint, fugue, and use of continuo, reminiscent of the Baroque. This is particularly true in the music written in the early part of the period.

The Classical era was an era of formality. The music was characterized by careful attention to form and by elegance and restraint. The formal structure was based on the use of thematic development and harmonic structure.

The music of the Classical era is characterized by objectivity. While emotion is an important aspect of all music, in the Classical period, emotions were carefully controlled. This control is evident in the use of dynamics and expressive differences within sections or movements of a composition. The Baroque notion of terraced dynamics, coupled with the expression of a single emotion in a given section of a composition, was replaced by the classical trait of varying the emotional content of a given movement, section, or even a measure of a piece. Dynamically speaking, this was accomplished through the use of crescendo and decrescendo. ---cmed.faculty.ku.edu

download (mp3 @320 kbs):

yandex mediafire ulozto gett

 

back

]]>
administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Classical Music For Dummies Sat, 22 Dec 2018 13:27:17 +0000
Classical Music For Dummies CD 3 - The Rise of Romanticism (2010) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/6436-classical-music-for-dummies/24607-classical-music-for-dummies-cd-3-the-rise-of-romanticism-2010.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/6436-classical-music-for-dummies/24607-classical-music-for-dummies-cd-3-the-rise-of-romanticism-2010.html Classical Music For Dummies CD 3 - The Rise of Romanticism (2010)

Image could not be displayed. Check browser for compatibility.


01. Gluck - Orphee & Eurydice - Ballet des ombres heureuses - R. Capucon-Ducros
02. von Weber - Freischutz - Ouverture (extr.) - Keilberth
03. Rossini - La pie voleuse - Ouverture (extr.) - Giulini
04. Rossini - Guillaume Tell - Ouverture (extr.) - Giulini
05. Schubert - Trio 2 D 929 - 2e mvt - Andante con moto (extr.) - Braley-R. & G. Capucon
06. Schubert - Moment musical D 780-3 - Kovacevich
07. Schubert - Symphonie 5 D 485 - 1er mvt - Alelgro (extr.) - Beecham
08. Schubert - Quatuor 14 La jeune fille & la mort D 810 - 2e mvt - Andante con moto (extr.) - Alban Berg Quartet
09. Schubert - Sonate piaNo.20 D 959 - Andantino (extr.) - Zacharias
10. Schubert - Quintette La Truite D 667 - Theme (Andante) - Menuhin, piano-Quatuor Amadeus-Merrett
11. Schubert - Le roi des Aulnes D 328 - Schwarzkopf-Parsons
12. Mendelssohn - Songe d'une nuit d'ete - Marche nuptiale (extr.) - Tate
13. Mendelssohn - Violon op. 64 - 1er mvt - Allegro molto appassionato (extr.) - Harding-Capucon
14. Bach - Passion St-Mathieu BWV 244 - 47. Erbarem dich - Nelson-Blythe
15. Chopin - Etude 3 op. 10-3 Tristesse - Francois
16. Chopin - Sonate piaNo.2 op. 35 - 3e mvt - Marche funebre (extr.) - Andsnes
17. Chopin - Valse 6 op. 64-1 Minute - Fliter
18. Chopin - Valse 7 op. 64-2 - Fliter
19. Chopin - Prelude 4 op. 28-4 - Rudy
20. Chopin - Nocturne 5 op. 15-2 - Francois
21. Paganini - Caprice 1 op. 1-1 - Rabin
22. Liszt - Etude de concert S 144 - 3. La ronde des lutins - Cziffra
23. Liszt - Rhapsodie hongroise 2 S 244-2 (extr.) - Cziffra
24. Liszt - Annees de pelerinage - III. Italie - 4. Jeux d'eau a la Villa d'Este - Cziffra

 

The last decade of the 18th century was a time of incredible change in the western world. The technological advances of the industrial revolution, the wars and upheaval of the enlightenment and the rise of scientific rationalization had eroded old certainties within the collective consciousness.

In other words, when you question or change all of the old rules of society, technology, politics and religion what are you left with? You’re left with yourself – at least that’s answer the Romantics gave.

The term Romanticism is borrowed from literature. There, it traditionally encompassed an adventurous subject matter and even more adventurous description. This is instinct over reason, heart over head, feeling over form. Imagination was the key to understanding the world, not faith or reason. Music expressed the ideals of Romanticism without needing to define words, objects or even forms. The composer became the hero with the ability to express emotions freely.

The figure of Beethoven stood as the example; his symphonies are the blueprint of Romantic expression, especially his 9th Symphony. This “Ode to Joy” was a celebration of the Ultimate Hero, mankind itself or “The Good Man” as Wagner described it. The work evokes a corporate joy, an expression of optimistic Humanism. That is the reason why this symphony and it’s principle melody has become so universal.

Melody became much more important than form for the Romantics. This was the time of the Art Song, from Schubert to Wolf. Opera came front and center as the expression of many art forms at once in works of Weber and Wagner. The concerto showcased the soloist, the artist as Hero. Virtuosity was praised. This was the era of Paganini and Franz Liszt. Rhythm blurred with rubato in the hands of Chopin, and the orchestra exploded to more than 120 members for the works of Gustav Mahler.

The Romantic movement took hold in Europe at the dawning of the 19th century and remained the dominant influence on musicians and composers for at least a hundred years.

Timeline is an exploration into the development of Western music. Take a journey into the events, characters and concepts that shaped our Western musical tradition. ---James Stewart, digital.vpr.net

download (mp3 @320 kbs):

yandex mediafire ulozto gett

 

back

]]>
administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Classical Music For Dummies Mon, 31 Dec 2018 15:58:11 +0000
Classical Music For Dummies CD 4 - Apogee of Romanticism (2010) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/6436-classical-music-for-dummies/24699-classical-music-for-dummies-cd-4-apogee-of-romanticism-2010.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/6436-classical-music-for-dummies/24699-classical-music-for-dummies-cd-4-apogee-of-romanticism-2010.html Classical Music For Dummies CD 4 - Apogee of Romanticism (2010)

Image could not be displayed. Check browser for compatibility.


01. Wagner - Lohengri - Prelude Acte I - Karajan
02. Wagner - Walkyrie - Chevauchee - Jansons
03. Wagner - Lohengrin - Choeur des fiancialles (extr.) - Heger-Chor der Bayerischen Staatsoper Munich
04. Wagner - Idylle de Siegfried - Janowski
05. Bruckner - Symphoonie 4 Romantique - 4e mvt - Finale. Bewegt, doch nicht zu schnell - Klemperer
06. J. Strauss II - Le beau Danube bleu op. 314 (extr.) - Boskovsky
07. Schumann - Scenes d'enfants op. 15 - 7. Reverie - Argerich
08. Schumann - Piano op. 54 - 1er mvt - Allegro affetuoso (extr.) - Jansons-Andsnes
09. Schumann - Carnaval de Vienne op. 26 - 4. Intermezzo - Cziffra
10. Brahms - Symphonie 3 op. 90 - 3e mvt - Poco allegretto - Harding
11. Brahms - Quatuor avec piaNo.1 op. 25 - 4e mvt - Rondo alla Zingarese (extr.) - Angelich - R. & G. Capucon - Causse
12. Brahms - Intermezzo op. 119-3 - Angelich
13. Brahms - Violon op. 77 - 3e mvt - Allegro giocoso (extr.) - Sawallisch-Zimmermann
14. Mahler - Symphonie 5 - 4e mvt - Adagietto - Rattle
15. Smetana - Ma Patrie - La Moldau (extr.) - Pesek
16. Dvorak - Danse slave op. 72-2 (extr.) - Maazel
17. Dvorak - Symphonie 9 du Nouveau Monde - 4e mvt - Allegro con fuoco op. 95 (extr.) - Giulini
18. Grieg - Peer Gynt op. 46 - 13. Au matin - Paavo Jarvi
19. Grieg - Suite au temps de Holberg op. 40 - Prelude - Paavo Jarvi
20. Verdi - Requiem - 2 - 1. Dies Irae - Muti-Coro teatro alla Scala di Milano
21. Verdi - Nabucco - Choeur des Esclaves - Muti-Ambrosian Opera Chorus
22. Puccini - Messe di Gloria - Credo. 10. Et Incarnatus est - Pappano-Alagna

 

The Romantic period started around 1830 and ended around 1900, as compositions became increasingly expressive and inventive. Expansive symphonies, virtuosic piano music, dramatic operas, and passionate songs took inspiration from art and literature. Famous Romantic composers include Tchaikovsky, Brahms, Mahler, and Verdi – to name but a few!

The Romantic era is known for its intense energy and passion. The rigid forms of classical music gave way to greater expression, and music grew closer to art, literature and theatre.

Beethoven pioneered Romanticism and expanded previously strict formulas for symphonies and sonatas, and introduced a whole new approach to music, giving his works references to other aspects of life - for example, his 'Pastoral' Symphony No. 6 describes countryside scenes.

As well as symphonies, the tone poem and descriptive overture were popular as pieces of stand-alone orchestral music that evoked anything from a painting or poem to a feeling of nationalistic fervour.

The Romantic era gave birth to the virtuoso. Liszt was one of the greatest of his time, and wrote demanding piano music to show off his own brilliance. Chopin is also among the outstanding composer-performers from this timeIn the world of opera, cue the entrance of Verdi in the middle of the Romantic era. He turned Italian opera on its head by introducing new subject material, often with social, political or nationalistic themes, and combined these with a direct approach to composing.

Germany’s Richard Wagner also played a key role in developing the operatic genre.Before Wagner, the action and music in opera was split into short pieces or 'numbers' much like a modern-day musical show. Wagner's operas are written as long, continuous sweeps of music. The characters and ideas are given short signature melodies called leitmotifs.

Wagner's ideas dominated most music, from the large-scale symphonies of Bruckner and Mahler to the heroic tone poems and operas of Richard Strauss, even reaching Italy, where Verdi and Puccini started to produce operas according to many of Wagner’s rules.

Ideas and compositions became more and more outlandish and inventive until the musical rules had to be rewritten, and the scene was set for the biggest change in music for centuries - the beginning of Modernism. ---classicfm.com

download (mp3 @320 kbs):

yandex mediafire ulozto gett bayfiles

 

back

]]>
administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Classical Music For Dummies Sat, 19 Jan 2019 14:44:36 +0000
Classical Music For Dummies CD5 - The Nations In Classical Music (2010) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/6436-classical-music-for-dummies/24749-classical-music-for-dummies-cd5-the-nations-in-classical-music-2010.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/6436-classical-music-for-dummies/24749-classical-music-for-dummies-cd5-the-nations-in-classical-music-2010.html Classical Music For Dummies CD5 - The Nations In Classical Music (2010)

Image could not be displayed. Check browser for compatibility.


01. Borodine - Prince Igor - Danse polovtienne 4 - Mackerras
02. Rimsky-Korsakov - Sheherazade op. 35 - 3. Le jeune Prince & la jeune Princesse (extr.) - Jordan
03. Moussorgski-Ravel - Tableaux d'une exposition - Grande porte de Kiev (extr.) - Rattle
04. Tchaikovsky - PiaNo.1 op. 23 - 1er mvt - Allegro non troppo (extr.) - Fedoseyev-Pletnev
05. Tchaikovsky - Le lac des Cygnes op. 66 - Acte II - Scene - Previn
06. Tchaikovsky - Casse-noisette op. 71 - 13. Valse des fleurs - Previn
07. Scriabine - Etude op. 8-12 - Lympany
08. Berlioz - Damnation de Faust - 4. Marche hongroise - Pr?tre
09. Berlioz - Symphonie fantastique - 2e mvt - Un bal (extr.) - Plasson
10. Offenbach - Gaite parisienne - Can-Can - Rosenthal
11. Franck - Symphonie en Rem op. 48 - 1er mvt - Lento (extr.) - Muti
12. Lalo - Symphonie espagnole - 3e mvt - Intermezzo (extr.) - Ozawa-Mutter
13. Saint-Sa?ns - Carnaval des animaux - 6. Aquarium - Nash ensemble
14. Bizet - Arlesienne - 1. Prelude (extr.) - Marriner
15. Chabrier - Espana - Plasson
16. Massenet - Meditation de Thais (extr.) - Harding-Capu?on
17. Faure - Pavane pour choeur & orchestre op. 50 - Barenboim
18. Faure - Requiem op. 48 - VII. In Paradisum - Barenboim-Edinburg Festival Chorus
19. Debussy- Children's corner L 113 - Golliwog's Cake Walk - Francois
20. Debussy - Suite bergamasque L 75 - Clair de Lune - Francois
21. Albeniz - Asturias (arr. Segovia) (extr.) - Byzantine
22. Granoados - Goyescas - 4. La jeune fille & le rossignol (extr.) - Ciccolini

 

At various times in history, national origin has been considered an important delineating characteristic in musical performance. This is partly the result of certain consistent emphases and features in the music written by composers of different nationalities. The Italians’ interest in the voice has evolved bel canto, a special quality derived from vocal music, which has carried over into their music for instruments (the stringed instruments especially), and into the general texture of Italian music, which has always given melody special prominence.

The English have had a highly developed and sophisticated musical performance tradition. Amateur improvisation figured importantly in its early history. While this has perhaps tended toward a conservative musical atmosphere, it has also produced a high standard for performance. The French have maintained a strong sense of national identity in their performing arts. In music their concerns for orderly design, delicate expressiveness, simplicity, naturalness, and beauty of sound extend back for centuries. Articulate philosophical and structural considerations have played important roles in developing nationalistic traits in the German tradition of musical performance.

The rich folklorist traditions of Spain, Hungary, and Russia have influenced rhythm, melody, and sonority in Western musical performing traditions. The Russian schools of string and piano technique have greatly advanced the performance resources of these instruments in the past 100 years. The United States, younger and more heterogeneous, has had a shorter musical history but an abundance of great symphony orchestras and solo artists, who are in demand because of their precise execution, versatility, and breadth of repertoire. ---britannica.com

download (mp3 @320 kbs):

yandex mediafire ulozto gett bayfiles

 

back

]]>
administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Classical Music For Dummies Tue, 29 Jan 2019 16:02:03 +0000
Classical Music For Dummies CD6 - On The Way For Modernity (2010) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/6436-classical-music-for-dummies/24814-classical-music-for-dummies-cd6-on-the-way-for-modernity-2010.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/6436-classical-music-for-dummies/24814-classical-music-for-dummies-cd6-on-the-way-for-modernity-2010.html Classical Music For Dummies CD6 - On The Way For Modernity (2010)

Image could not be displayed. Check browser for compatibility.


01. Richard Strauss - Ainsi parlait Zarathoustra
02. Carl Orff - Carmina Burana
03. Edward Elgar - Pomp and Circomstance
04. Ralph Vaughan-Williams - Fantaisie sur Greensleeves
05. Gustav Holst - Les Planets
06. Benjamin Britten - Simple Symphony
07. Paul Dukas - L'Apprenti Sorcier
08. Erik Satie - Gymnopedie N°1
09. Albert Roussel - Le Festin de l'araignee
10. Maurice Ravel - Bolero
11. Darius Milhaud - Le Boeuf sur le toit
12. Francis Poulenc - Voncerto pour 2 pianos
13. Arnold Shonberg - La nuit transfiguree
14. Anton Webern - Six pieces orchestrales
15. Pierre Boulez - Douze notations pour le piano
16. Leos Janacek - Sinfonietta
17. Bela Bartok - Danses populaires roumaines
18. Jean Sibelius - Concerto pour violon et orchestre en re mineur
19. Manuel de Falla - La vie breve
20. Joaquin Rodrigo - Concierto de Aranjuez
21. Heitor Villa-Lobos - Bachianas Brasileiras N°5
22. George Gerschwin - Rhapsody in Blue
23. Samuel Barber - Adagio
24. Leonard Bernstein - West Side Story
25. Sergui Rachmaninov - Concerto pour piano N°2
26. Serguei Prokoviev - Romeo et Juliette
27. Serguei Prokoviev - Pierre et le loup
28. Igor Stravinsky - Le Sacre du Printemps
29. Aram Khatchatourian - Danse du Sabre
30. Dimitri Chostakovitch - Jazz suite N°2 (Valse)
31. Olivier Messiaen - Quatuor pour la fin du temps
32. Henri Dutilleux - Au gre des Ondes
33. Arvo Part - Spiegel im Spiegle
34. Philip Glass - Fasades

 

Modernity in music is a multi-faceted and complex phenomenon. The much-used "modernism" is also a catch-all definition which leaves questions still hanging in the air. It is, like socialism or spirituality, a word that can easily be hijacked by partisan voices that then claim ownership of it and thereafter imbue it with their own narrow, specific, pointed, sectarian and self-justifying aura. It has to be said that a particular kind of modernism, specific to certain places, times, ideologies and forceful personalities, has been sublimated into a paradigmatic position in our own time.

A European modernism, with its roots in the Second Viennese School and developed by a small group of post-war composers in certain European towns and cities, has been given a special place in official understandings of the development of modern music. A message has gone out that composers, and indeed the musical public, should regard this sanctioned path as, not just the way forward, but the way things are and ought to be. State broadcasters, many sharing the aesthetic and political perspective of the composers themselves and their followers, give the oxygen of life, publicity and dissemination to this view of the musical present and future.

This has been especially the case in Germany and France, which are much more controlled by a centralised and top-down view of what high culture should be. A central, pivotal figure in this development is Pierre Boulez, composer, conductor and radically scathing polemicist, at least in his younger days. An Alpha male par excellence in the musical world, a powerful, driven figure, always manoeuvring politically and pushing boundaries imaginatively, he has never hidden his determination to put his biases into operation. It has been suggested that his influence on legions of third-rate imitators over the last few generations has been pernicious. Mediocre acolytes have been bedazzled by the master's encyclopaedic panoply of colouristic subtleties and rhythmic intricacies — so much so, that a lot of modern music is obsessed, fetishistically, with surface detail to the detriment, perhaps, of core profundities.

Nevertheless, Boulez's influence on musical culture as a composer and a conductor has been powerful and meticulously plotted. His choice of repertoire is large and interesting, covering Berlioz, Debussy, Ravel, Stravinsky, Bartók, Schoenberg and Messiaen. Others are constantly and steadily added — Wagner, Mahler and some major contemporary figures such as Berio and Ligeti. But the omissions from this list are also fascinating and revealing. There is no Brahms and hardly any Schumann. He compares the latter unfavourably (justifiably so, perhaps) to Mendelssohn as showing "little invention and even little skill". Explaining his priorities, Boulez says: "There are composers who possess this gift of instrumental invention and others who, more or less, lack it...If you compare the symphonies of Brahms with the operas of Wagner solely from the viewpoint of instrumentation...one is not bowled over by his [Brahms's] instrumental imagination."

"Solely from the viewpoint of instrumentation" is the key here. Brahms's structural genius in reshaping classical models, his gift for soaring melody and expansive spiritual vision are all subordinated to the ear-tickling skill of instrumental choice. This is understandably French, of course, and Boulez comes from a tradition that has emphasised perfumed delicacies and nuanced subtleties, but it may explain not only his blind spots, but also modernism's over-indulgence of surfaces instead of the deep heart. Perhaps this justifies Boulez's disregard of Bruckner, Hindemith and Sibelius and all the Russians from Prokofiev and Shostakovich to Schnittke.

It may also explain the Anglophobic prejudices of many French musicians — Britten and Tippett do not appear in Boulez's repertoire and precious little that has been written since. But there are also significant French omissions — no Poulenc or any of the important contemporary figures that follow a different aesthetic and reject the dogmas of L'Eglise Boulezienne. As far as American music is concerned, no Copland, no Adams, but lots of Elliott Carter. ---James Macmillan, standpointmag.co.uk

download (mp3 @320 kbs):

yandex mediafire ulozto gett bayfiles

 

back

]]>
administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Classical Music For Dummies Mon, 11 Feb 2019 16:07:56 +0000