Classical The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/619.html Wed, 08 Dec 2021 04:03:03 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Anton Bruckner - Mass 2 & 3 • Te Deum • 5 Motets (2003) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/619-antonbruckner/8172-bruckner-mass-2-a-3-te-deum-5-motets.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/619-antonbruckner/8172-bruckner-mass-2-a-3-te-deum-5-motets.html Anton Bruckner - Mass 2 & 3 • Te Deum • 5 Motets (2003)

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CD1
1. Mass No.2 in E Minor I.Kyrie 9:18
2. Mass No.2 in E Minor II.Gloria 6:16
3. Mass No.2 in E Minor III.Credo 10:30
4. Mass No.2 in E Minor IV.Sanctus 4:31 play
5. Mass No.2 in E Minor V.Benedictus 6:32
6. Mass No.2 in E Minor VI.Agnus Dei 6:08
7. Te Deum Te Deum laudamus (choir/solo quartet) 6:02
8. Te Deum Te ergo quaesumus (solo quartet) 2:53 play
9. Te Deum Aeterna fac cum sanctis tuis (solo quartet/choir) 1:18
10. Te Deum Salvum fac populum tuum (solo quartet/choir) 6:32
11. Te Deum In te, Domine, speravi (choir/solo quartet) 6:00

CD2
1. Mass No. 3 in F minor Kyrie 10:24
2. Mass No. 3 in F minor Gloria 10:07
3. Mass No. 3 in F minor Credo 17:36
4. Mass No. 3 in F minor Sanctus 2:13 play
5. Mass No. 3 in F minor Benedictus 8:19
6. Mass No. 3 in F minor Agnus 9:22
7. Motets Ave Maria 3:12
8. Motets Christus factus est 4:34
9. Motets Locus iste 2:46
10. Motets Os justi 3:34 play
11. Motets Virga Jesse 3:07

CD1
1-6 Mass No.2 in E minor

John Adlis Choir (Chorus Master: John Adlis)
English Chamber Orchestra
Daniel Barenboim

7-11 Te Deum
Anne Pashley (s), Birgit Finnilä (ca), Robert Tear (t), Don Garrard (bs)
New Philharmonia Chorus (Chorus Master: Wilhelm Pitz)
New Philharmonia Orchestra
Daniel Barenboim

CD2
1-6 Mass No.3 in F minor

Heather Harper (s), Anna Reynolds (ca), Robert Tear (t), Marius Rintzler (bs)
New Philharmonia Chorus (Chorus Master: Wilhelm Pitz)
New Philharmonia Orchestra
Daniel Barenboim

7-11 5 Motets
New Philharmonia Chorus
Wilhelm Pitz

 

Bruckner wrote a Te Deum, settings of various Psalms (including Psalm 150 in the 1890s), various motets (among them settings of Christus factus est pro nobis and Ave Maria), and at least seven Masses. His Requiem in D minor of 1849 is the earliest work Bruckner himself considered worthy of preservation. It shows the clear influence of Mozart's Requiem (also in D minor) and similar works of Michael Haydn. His early Masses were usually short Austrian Landmessen for use in local churches and did not always set all the numbers of the ordinary. The three Masses Bruckner wrote in the 1860s and revised later on in his life are more often performed. The Masses numbered 1 in D minor and 3 in F minor are for solo singers, chorus and orchestra, while No. 2 in E minor is for chorus and a small group of wind instruments, and was written in an attempt to meet the Cecilians halfway. The Cecilians wanted to rid church music of instruments entirely. No. 3 was clearly meant for concert, rather than liturgical performance, and it is the only one of his Masses in which he set the first line of the Gloria, "Gloria in excelsis Deo", and of the Credo, "Credo in unum Deum", to music. (In concert performances of the other Masses, these lines are intoned by a tenor soloist in the way a priest would, with a line of plainsong).

Bruckner's motets have been called symphonies in miniature, teeming with overt dynamic and emotional range, often within just the span of a few measures. They are therefore almost perfectly suited to the Corydon Singers, who perform this selection of motets with an almost operatic fervor. Aside from Dennis Keene's Voices of Ascension, I have never heard another choir approach sacred music with such intensity and exquisitely soloistic vocal technique. Listen for example to the basses' solo line "a deo" in the "Locus Iste," and you will hear it performed as grippingly as Bruckner intended. I wouldn't necessarily want to hear them perform Händel, but in this repertoire they are unmatched. –Eric Westby

These wonderful pieces of liturgical music represent the peace and purity Bruckner found through his faith in God. The writing is at times simple...as it should be...but this simplicity only serves to accentuate the tranquility and beauty of these works. Bruckner the symphonist and Bruckner the devout Catholic. Much like Bach, Bruckner's music bears witness to God and I even find myself truly believing when listening. In this day and age of largely agnostic and God-less music, it is Bruckner's music which I find so dear and it will forever remain so for those in need, due to its intrinsic spiritual and faithful character. –Bruckerian2006

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Bruckner Anton Wed, 09 Feb 2011 10:01:44 +0000
Anton Bruckner - Mass No.1 in D minor (2003) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/619-antonbruckner/9443-bruckner-messe-in-e-rheinberger-requiem-in-es.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/619-antonbruckner/9443-bruckner-messe-in-e-rheinberger-requiem-in-es.html Anton Bruckner - Mass No.1 in D minor (2003)

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1. Kyrie
2. Gloria
3. Credo
4. Sanctus
5. Benedictus
6. Agnus Dei

Isabelle Müller-Kant (soprano)
Eibe Möhlmann (mezzo-soprano)
Daniel Sans (tenor)
Christof Fischesses (bass)
Chamber Choir of Europe
Württemburgische Philharmonic Reutlingen
Nicol Matt – conductor

Recorded 20-25 January 2003, Württemberg, Germany

 

Bruckner composed the Mass No.1 in D minor, for soloists, choir and orchestra in 1864, two years before his first mature symphony in C major. Bruckner was rarely satisfied with his compositions and was always looking for improvement. He obsessively strove for perfection and consequently made revisions to the work in 1876 and 1882. The D minor Mass has never been as popular as the two that were to follow although it is a marvellous work. Evident everywhere is Bruckner’s contrapuntal skill revealing both a real uniqueness of harmonic thought and inventiveness and arguably his predisposition towards ambiguous tonalities. The D minor Mass has that intense seriousness of purpose that is so characteristic of the greatest Bruckner.

Brilliant Classics typically use previously released material, licensed from other labels, in their sets but appear to have produced this 2003 recording of the first Mass for themselves. The vocal and orchestral forces are in excellent form and seem particularly appropriate choices. Austrian Nicol Matt is in control of the proceedings conveying a powerful and expressive reading. The four soloists and the Chamber Choir of Europe, who were founded in 1998 as the Nordic Chamber Choir provide an inspiring blend of voices producing a fine quality of tone. The digital recorded sound is warm and clear. ---Michael Cookson, musicweb-international.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Bruckner Anton Thu, 16 Jun 2011 18:40:57 +0000
Anton Bruckner - String Quintet; Intermezzo; Rondo; String Quartet (1994) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/619-antonbruckner/17375-anton-bruckner-string-quintet-intermezzo-rondo-string-quartet-1994.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/619-antonbruckner/17375-anton-bruckner-string-quintet-intermezzo-rondo-string-quartet-1994.html Anton Bruckner - String Quintet; Intermezzo; Rondo; String Quartet (1994)

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1. String Quintet In F Major: I Gemassigt
2. String Quintet In F Major: II Scherzo. Schnell - Trio. Langsamer
3. String Quintet In F Major: III Adagio
4. String Quintet In F Major: IV Finale. Lebhaft bewegt
5. Intermezzo In D Minor: Moderato - Trio. Langsamer
6. Rondo In C Minor For String Quartet
7. String Quartet In C Minor: I Allegro moderato
8. String Quartet In C Minor: II Andante
9. String Quartet In C Minor: III Scherzo. Presto - Trio
10. String Quartet In C Minor: IV Rondo. Schnell

Vera Beths (Violin)
Anner Bylsma (Cello)
Lisa Rautenberg (Violin) 
Jürgen Kussmaul (Viola)
Guus Jeukendrup (Viola)

 

Bruckner's early string quartet is more a composition exercise than a full-fledged work of art, but the quintet is something else entirely: a chamber music masterpiece to rank with the great symphonies in expressive intensity and sheer musical grandeur. Indeed, there are a few places where Bruckner seems to demand an almost orchestral volume of tone, and the slow movement has been successful performed (and recorded) by a full string orchestra. The Intermezzo is none other than an alternative scherzo for the quintet, composed because the original players at the premier found Bruckner's first thoughts too difficult. Well, the members of L'Archibudelli certainly don't find the music too difficult--you won't find better performances anywhere. --David Hurwitz, amazon.com

 

''Bruckner is long, he takes time'', says Anner Bylsma in an interview on page 16; not exactly controversial, but it is important in understanding his, and his ensemble's approach to the Quintet. The first movement in particular is more spacious than any other version I can remember. But there is more to it than tempo. Nowadays there seems to be a widespread idea that slowness equals profundity—that all you have to do in Bruckner is hold back the beat and cultivate a suitably opulent sound. What matters here is the subtlety of phrasing and fineness of the shading, giving vitality and inner intensity to patterns that can easily sound repetitive, especially at this speed. And until this performance I hadn't realized how much of the Quintet is marked p, pp or ppp; L'Archibudelli show how magically suggestive so many of the quiet passages can be and how important it is to respect those dynamic gradings. ...L'Archibudelli...make the work as a whole sound as unified and sublimely purposeful as the best of the symphonies. The adjustments of tempo in the finale feel effortlessly logical... For its structural revelations—and sheer musicality—I'd put L'Archibudelli's version even higher than the fine Alberni version on CRD... The spaciousness of the Sony sound suits the Quintet especially well... --- Stephen Johnson, Gramophone [3/1995], arkivmusic.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Bruckner Anton Wed, 25 Feb 2015 16:09:43 +0000
Anton Bruckner - Symphony No. 3 In D Minor (Karajan) [1990] http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/619-antonbruckner/1368-brucknersym3.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/619-antonbruckner/1368-brucknersym3.html Anton Bruckner - Symphony No. 3 In D Minor (Karajan) [1990]


1. Misterioso
2. Adagio
3. Scherzo
4. Finale.Allegro

Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Herbert von Karajan – conductor

First released in 1981

 

Anton Bruckner's Symphony No. 3 in D minor (WAB 103) was dedicated to Richard Wagner and is sometimes known as his "Wagner Symphony". It was written in 1873, revised in 1877 and again in 1889.

The work has been characterised as "difficult", and is regarded by some as Bruckner's artistic breakthrough. According to Rudolf Kloiber, the third symphony "opens the sequence of Bruckner's masterpieces, in which his creativity meets monumental ability of symphonic construction." The work is notorious as the most-revised of Bruckner's symphonies, and there exist no fewer than six versions, with two of them, the 1873 original and the composer's last thoughts of 1889, being widely performed today.

Bruckner produced the version of 1889 – the version most often played nowadays – at the same time as he was occupied with the re-shaping of the Eighth. He took the printed edition of 1878 as the basis for his revision of the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd movements; when making his extensive cuts to the Finale, he used a copy made by Franz Schalk. The performance on 21 December 1890, given by the Vienna Philharmonic under Hans Richter, was a complete success. --- mwv.at

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Bruckner Anton Wed, 21 Oct 2009 20:07:47 +0000
Anton Bruckner - Symphony No. 4 in E-flat major ‘Romantic’ (Karajan) [1993] http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/619-antonbruckner/1366-brucknersym4karajan.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/619-antonbruckner/1366-brucknersym4karajan.html Anton Bruckner - Symphony No. 4 in E-flat major ‘Romantic’ (Karajan) [1993]


1. Bewegt, nicht zu schnell
2. Andante, quasi allegretto
3. Scherzo, Bewegt - Trio: Nicht zu schnell
4. Finale: Bewegt, doch nicht zu schnell

Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Herbert von Karajan - conductor

 

Symphony No. 4 in E Flat Major "Romantic". Anton Bruckner's (1824-1896) Fourth Symphony, known as the "Romantic", which he composed in 1874 and substantially revised between 1878 and 1880, has always been the most popular of all his works. During Bruckner's lifetime the Fourth, together with the Seventh, received more performances than any of his other symphonies; the world premiere of the Fourth, which took place in Vienna on 20 Feb. 1881, was a great success (especially striking after the failure of the Third), and Bruckner considered this to be the "most understandable" of his works. Undoubtedly the popularity of this symphony derives from its well-judged formal structure, its mode of expression, the immediacy of its melodic ideas, and the radiance of its tone colours. ---Editorial Review, amazon.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Bruckner Anton Wed, 21 Oct 2009 20:04:30 +0000
Anton Bruckner - Symphony No. 7 in E major (Karajan) [1971] http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/619-antonbruckner/14767-bruckner-symphony-no-7-in-e-major-karajan-1971.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/619-antonbruckner/14767-bruckner-symphony-no-7-in-e-major-karajan-1971.html Anton Bruckner - Symphony No. 7 in E major (Karajan) [1971]

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1. Allegro moderato
2. Adagio (Sehr feierlich und sehr langsam)
3. Scherzo (Sehr schnell) & Trio (Etwaslangsamer)
4. Finale (Bewegt, doch nicht schnell)

Berliner Philharmoniker
Herbert von Karajan – conductor

 

Karajan's 1971 EMI recording of Bruckner's Seventh Symphony, originally issued as a three-LP set with the Fourth Symphony, is so lucidly shaped and so luminously played that one listens to it as if under some rare form of musical hypnosis. It was one of Karajan's later Berlin recordings in the Jesus-Christus Kirche and it has a proper Brucknerian spaciousness and atmosphere, with considerable depth of field and a pleasing degree of reverberation, yet with plenty of definition where it matters in the swifter parts of the Scherzo and finale. Karajan's 1975 recording (12/86) made as part of the complete DG/Berlin cycle in the Philharmonie, is a tauter performance, more dryly recorded, less lovable than this reading which reflects something of the orchestra's work at the time of the music of Debussy, Sibelius, and Wagner's Ring. In this 1971 recording, Bruckner emerges as a master symphonist with what are possibly pantheistic longings. ---The Gramophone, June 1989

 

This is the earliest of Karajan's three recordings of Bruckner's Seventh (the first two with BPO, the last--the conductor's final recording--with the VPO), and it is clearly superior to his later versions. The sound is warmer than the DG/BPO recording, and so is the interpretation. The DG/VPO version, on the other hand, strikes me as too soft-centered, closer to Bruno Walter's way with the composer than we might have expected from Karajan.

The EMI/BPO version, therefore, is the one to get; indeed, it is the most eloquent rendition of this work I have heard. It's difficult to ruin the opening of the symphony, with its seamless melodic arches, but in Karajan's hands it is simply magical: hushed, intense, never pushing ahead too aggressively or interrupting the flow with gratuitious rubato or agogic distortions. And the spell continues unbroken from that point to the end of the movement. The great Adagio is less a funeral observance for Richard Wagner (which is presumably what Bruckner intended) than a threnody for a world in need of redemption, a heavenly Mass for All Souls. The scherzo interrupts these rites with an impertinent cockcrow, conveying a sense of tingling anticipation; dawn is at hand. The finale, which can seem the weakest of the four movements in lesser performances, blossoms as its should without overbalancing the rapt first movement and weighty Adagio; it neither seems perfunctory nor outstays its welcome.

In sum, this is something like a complete realization of Bruckner's most accessible symphony. Karajan's DG version is also a strong performance, but some of the magic had gone out of his conception by the time he had come to revisit the score. The expressive nuances Karajan discovers in the EMI version seem utterly natural; whereas the eloquence in the DG version seems a bit forced. The EMI has another great advantage: it costs a tiny fraction of what you would have to pay to obtain the 10-CD set from DG--now available only as an expensive import-- in which the later version of the Seventh is immured.

Don't hesitate then, if you are new to Bruckner; and if you are a veteran collector, there is every reason to add this one to your collection. ---Johannes Climacus, amazon.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Bruckner Anton Fri, 13 Sep 2013 16:11:43 +0000
Anton Bruckner - Symphony No.0 (Davies) [2010] http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/619-antonbruckner/1364-brucknersym0.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/619-antonbruckner/1364-brucknersym0.html Anton Bruckner - Symphony No.0 (Davies) [2010]


1 Allegro
2 Andante
3 Scherzo: Presto — Trio: Langsamer und ruhiger
4 Finale: Moderato — Allegro vivace

Brucknerorchester Linz
Colin Davies - conductor

 

This Symphony in D minor (WAB 100) composed by Anton Bruckner was not assigned a number by its composer, and has subsequently become known by the German designation Die Nullte (translated to The Zeroth or Number Nought in English).

Bruckner never gave this symphony a number, but long after its composition declared that it "gilt nicht" ("doesn't count") and on one copy of the score he put in an empty set symbol (∅). This symbol was later interpreted as a numeral zero. According to the conductor Georg Tintner, this lack of confidence in the work arose from a question by the puzzled conductor of the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Felix Otto Dessoff, who asked Bruckner, "Where is the main theme?" ---wikipedia

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Bruckner Anton Wed, 21 Oct 2009 20:00:06 +0000
Anton Bruckner - Symphony No.4 Romantic (Jochum) [1997] http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/619-antonbruckner/1365-bruckner-symphony-no4.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/619-antonbruckner/1365-bruckner-symphony-no4.html Anton Bruckner - Symphony No.4 Romantic (Jochum) [1997]

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1 Bewegt, nicht zu schnell [17.58]
2 Andante, quasi allegretto [14.34]
3 Scherzo (Bewegt) [10.05]
4 Finale (Bewegt, doch nicht zu schnell) [17.24]

Berliner Philharmoniker
Eugen Jochum - conductor

 

I remember fondly an electrifying and impulsive Bruckner Fourth from the Fifties with Jochum and the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra. Happily, this remake with the Berlin Philharmonic is just as fine and benefits from modern stereo sound and of course, the Berlin Philharmonic. Jochum seems to be one of the few who can infuse real drama into this score without neglecting its pastoral lyricism. I defy anyone to be able to sit still during the famous "Hunting" Scherzo. I would be interested to know if any listeners know Jochum's earliest recording of the work on Telefunken, with the Hamburg State Philharmonic. I just purchased the Bruckner Fifth on Music and Arts with that ensemble, and I was quite overwhelmed by that performance's power and impulse, more so than Jochum's latter performance on DG. Nevertheless, even if the Fourth from that vintage should emerge, the Berlin performance will always remain special. ---Ralph J. Steinberg, amazon.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Bruckner Anton Wed, 21 Oct 2009 20:03:04 +0000
Anton Bruckner - Symphony No.6 In A Major (Karajan) [1990] http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/619-antonbruckner/1367-brucknersym6jochum.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/619-antonbruckner/1367-brucknersym6jochum.html Anton Bruckner - Symphony No.6 In A Major (Karajan) [1990]


I:  Majestoso
II: Adagio. Sehr feierlich
III:Scherzo. Nicht schnell Trio. Langsam
IV: Finale. Bewegt, doch nicht zu schnell

Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Herbert von Karajan - conductor

First released in 1980

 

Symphony No. 6 in A major (WAB 106) by Austrian composer Anton Bruckner (1824–1896) is a work in four movements composed between September 24, 1879 and September 3, 1881 and dedicated to his landlord, Dr. Anton van Ölzelt-Newin. Though it possesses many characteristic features of a Bruckner symphony, it differs the most from the rest of his symphonic repertory. Redlich went so far as to cite the lack of hallmarks of Bruckner's symphonic compositional style in the Sixth Symphony for the somewhat bewildered reaction of supporters and critics alike.

The differences between Bruckner's autograph and the first printed edition of 1899 are a graphic demonstration of what drastic changes were made for the sake of bringing Bruckner's music into step with the orchestral sound prevalent at the time. The critical report is evidence of the intensity with which, throughout his life, Bruckner devoted himself to giving his works their final form and shape, paying attention even to the smallest details as he forged the musical texts which he intended to be binding for posterity. --- mwv.at

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Bruckner Anton Wed, 21 Oct 2009 20:06:02 +0000
Anton Bruckner - Symphony No.8 In C Minor (Karajan) [1989] http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/619-antonbruckner/8892-anton-bruckner-symphonie-no-8-boulez-2000.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/619-antonbruckner/8892-anton-bruckner-symphonie-no-8-boulez-2000.html Anton Bruckner - Symphony No.8 In C Minor (Karajan) [1989]

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1. Symphony No.8 in C minor - Ed. Haas - 1. Allegro moderato 15:09
2. Symphony No.8 in C minor - Ed. Haas - 2. Scherzo: Allegro moderato 13:43
3. Symphony No.8 in C minor - Ed. Haas - 3. Adagio: Feierlich langsam; doch nicht schleppend 24:56
4. Symphony No.8 in C minor - Ed. Haas - 4. Finale: Feierlich, nicht schnell

Wiener Philharmoniker
Herbert von Karajan - conductor
Recorded live in St. Florian, near Linz, at the International Bruckner Festival 1996

 

Herbert von Karajan identified with the Eighth perhaps more intensely than with any other score in the repertory; it is significant that in February 1989, in what proved to be his last performances outside of Austria, he brought it to New York with the VPO and made it the centerpiece of a three-concert engagement. The air of finality was heavy at those concerts, and Karajan, determined to go out as a conqueror, did just that. This 1988 recording comes very close to recapturing the experience of that live performance. Karajan's careful pacing gives the Eighth time to unfurl, allowing the mystery and tenderness of Bruckner's vision to radiate from some place deep within the paroxysmal intensity of the symphony's argument. The cumulative effect is shattering. Throughout, the Viennese play beyond their limits, as if their lives depended on it. The recorded sound is vivid and of very wide dynamic range. ---Ted Libbey, amazon.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Bruckner Anton Fri, 08 Apr 2011 19:55:19 +0000