Classical The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/1049.html Fri, 01 Jul 2022 02:11:31 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Gian Carlo Menotti – Goya (2005) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/1049-menotti-gian-carlo/3757-menotti-apocalypse-fantasia-for-cello-and-orchestra-sebastian-suite.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/1049-menotti-gian-carlo/3757-menotti-apocalypse-fantasia-for-cello-and-orchestra-sebastian-suite.html Gian Carlo Menotti – Goya (2005)

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Disc 1
1	Goya, opera in 3 acts: Act One; Brucia l' annuncio
2	Goya, opera in 3 acts: Act one; Ma, dimmi... Non l'hai vista?
3	Goya, opera in 3 acts: Act One; Frotte d'angeli in volo
4	Goya, opera in 3 acts: Act One; Hai sentito?
5	Goya, opera in 3 acts: Act One; Intermezzo
6	Goya, opera in 3 acts: Act One; Aspetta qua
7	Goya, opera in 3 acts: Act One; Guarda che faccia!
8	Goya, opera in 3 acts: Act One; Ora che siam soli
9	Goya, opera in 3 acts: Act One; Ridi se vuoi
10	Goya, opera in 3 acts: Act One; Cosi finisci il ritratto?
11	Goya, opera in 3 acts: Act Two; No, no, no!
12	Goya, opera in 3 acts: Act Two; Cosa succede?
13	Goya, opera in 3 acts: Act Two; Arrivano i reali
14	Goya, opera in 3 acts: Act Two; Sua MaestĂ  ordina

Disc 2
1	Goya, opera in 3 acts: Act Three; Signora Duchess
2	Goya, opera in 3 acts: Act Three; Son nemici odio e amor
3	Goya, opera in 3 acts: Act Three; Oh! Mia povera Cayetana
4	Goya, opera in 3 acts: Act Three; Oh Dio!
5	Goya, opera in 3 acts: Act Three; Tu desti vita
6	Goya, opera in 3 acts: Act Three; Intermezzo
7	Goya, opera in 3 acts: Act Three; Ecco, il genio
8	Goya, opera in 3 acts: Act Three; Teresa! Maria! Rosario! Antonia!
9	Goya, opera in 3 acts: Act Three; Chi e la? Chi e?
10	Goya, opera in 3 acts: Act Three; Tu hai visto com'e crudele l'uomo 

Charles IV: Howard Bender
Duchessa Alba (Dona Cayetana): Suzanna Guzman
Francisco Goya: César Hernández
Innkeeper: Daniele Tonini
Leocadia: Karen Nickell
Maid: Angela Adams
Majordomus: Dominic Inferrera
Manuel Godoy: Andrew Wentzel
Martin Zapater: Boaz Senator
Regina di Spaga (Maria Luisa): Penelope Daner
Spoleto Festival Orchestra, Westminster Choir
Steven Mercurio: Conductor 

 

In Goya, (as in La Loca, written several years before it) Menotti set before himself the difficult task of creating one of the most notoriously treacherous types of opera -- the biographical opera that spans many years of the protagonist's life. The compression of an entire life into a few episodes is rarely effective; the bio-operas that succeed, such as Boris Godunov, Pfitzner's Palestrina, and Hindemith's Mathis der Maler, work because they focus on a single episode or a limited time period in the protagonist's life and have an overriding theme larger than the biography of an individual. La Loca and Goya concern larger-than-life historical figures, spanning the characters' lives from youth to old age, but treat no theme larger than the individual's biography and are inevitably episodic rather than dramatically cohesive.

Even episodic operas can overcome scenarios that are more like snapshots than integrated narratives (La bohème, for instance) if the music is strong enough. The music in Goya, however, doesn't have enough character or distinctiveness to make the drama come alive. Menotti has written a very grand "Grand Opera" that is relentlessly overwrought musically and dramatically and full of nineteenth century-style Spanish exoticisms. The opera was written as a vehicle for Plácido Domingo, so the composer's desire to employ the emotional bel canto lyricism at which Domingo excels is understandable, but the music sounds generically like Romantic grand opera and has few moments that are truly memorable. Significantly, those moments are often the lightest, such as the Duchess of Alba's wicked joke of dressing her ladies in waiting in copies of the Queen's gown. Menotti's depiction of the beginning of Goya's deafness at the end of the second act is also genuinely effective.

The recording is taken from a live 1991 performance at Spoleto, in a revised version of the score the composer made after the premiere at the Washington Opera five years earlier. The opera is performed in Italian translation. Steven Mercurio leads the Spoleto Festival Orchestra and the Westminster Choir in a spirited performance. Tenor Cesar Hernandez's lyrical intensity and passion amply fill the demanding title role. Sopranos Suzanna Guzmán as the Duchess of Alba and Penelope Daner as the Queen, and baritone Andrew Wentzel as Godoy are his equals in the musical and dramatic vividness of their characterizations. There is some audience and stage noise, but generally the sound is clear, with good balance between the singers and the orchestra. ---Stephen Eddins, Rovi

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Menotti Gian Carlo Fri, 05 Mar 2010 21:16:43 +0000
Menotti - Violin Concerto and other works (2002) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/1049-menotti-gian-carlo/2870-menotti-violin-concerto.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/1049-menotti-gian-carlo/2870-menotti-violin-concerto.html Menotti - Violin Concerto and other works (2002)

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Concerto for Violin and Orchestra 28:40
1 I Allegro moderato 12:53
2 II Adagio 8:27
3 III Allegro vivace 7:17

4 Muero porque no muero 11:02
  Cantata for soprano, chorus and orchestra
  Billy Hunter trumpet
 
5 Oh llama de amor viva 9:16
  Cantata for baritone, chorus and orchestra
 
6 The Death of Orpheus 12:11
  Cantata for tenor, chorus and orchestra
 
  Julia Melinek soprano
  Jamie MacDougall tenor
  Stephen Roberts baritone
  Jennifer Koh violin
 
Spoleto Festival Choir
Spoleto Festival Orchestra
Richard Hickox - conductor
 
Recorded in:
 Teatro Nuovo, Spoleto, Italy
 4 & 5 July 2001

 

The opening movement of the Violin Concerto is one of the loveliest things Menotti has ever written. Mostly quiet, it is a serenely relaxed exploration of an unusual richness of thematic material (the lightly scored 'development section' is hardly under way when a fine new idea arrives), and although it taxes the soloist it never demands flamboyant showiness. It is very well suited, indeed, to Jennifer Koh, whose tone is beautiful but slim; she plays a fine Stradivari but never forces it.It would be unkind to say that the rest of this disc never regains that level; but the slow movement of the concerto does not, and the genial finale does not attempt to. The three short cantatas (none of them recorded before) show another aspect of Menotti's lyricism. In all three, the words (respectively by St Teresa of Avila, St John of the Cross and Menotti himself) are of paramount importance, so each is based less on long cantabile tunes than on pervasive but developing motto phrases. In the St Teresa setting that phrase startlingly generates what must surely be an inadvertent but nonetheless uncannily almost-literal quotation from Mikis Theodorakis (the third movement of his Neruda cantata Canto General). The second, more memorably, reaches a climax in intense string lyricism and rich choral writing: an image of the 'living flame' of divine love. The destination of The Death of Orpheus is a long melody which stands on the very brink of the sentimental or the saccharine but, at least for those who love tunes and are grateful to Menotti for writing so many of them, does not quite fall into that abyss; not quite.Excellent performances: Koh is outstanding, the orchestra first-class. Both Melinek and Roberts push their voices rather too hard; MacDougall does not. ---Michael Oliver, amazon.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Menotti Gian Carlo Wed, 23 Dec 2009 11:19:12 +0000
Menotti – Apocalypse (Tone poem) (2001) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/1049-menotti-gian-carlo/19479-menotti--apocalypse-tone-poem-2001.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/classical/1049-menotti-gian-carlo/19479-menotti--apocalypse-tone-poem-2001.html Menotti – Apocalypse (Tone poem) (2001)

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1 	I. Improperia			11'31".
2 	II. La citta celeste		  4'23".
3	III. Gli angeli militant		  4'59".

Spoleto Festival Orchestra
Richard Hickox – conductor

 

Most people know only the Apocalypse by St. John the Divine in the last book of the New Testament (Revelation). I have read many different accounts of the Apocalypse, most of which are in the form poetry; this composition is a sort of synthesis or general impression of all the literature on this subject , the best known of which, aside from the writings of St. John, are the versions from Baruch and Enoch. Whereas most of us think of the Apocalypse as a description of a future catastrophe, I found inspiration in the more lyrical, ecstatic and mystical pages of the writings. ---Gian Carlo Menotti

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Menotti Gian Carlo Wed, 30 Mar 2016 16:11:47 +0000