Blues The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/968.html Sun, 25 Sep 2022 03:56:26 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Alberta Hunter ‎– The Legendary Alberta Hunter: '34 London Sessions (1981) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/968-alberta-hunter/25286-alberta-hunter-the-legendary-alberta-hunter-34-london-sessions-1981.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/968-alberta-hunter/25286-alberta-hunter-the-legendary-alberta-hunter-34-london-sessions-1981.html Alberta Hunter ‎– The Legendary Alberta Hunter: '34 London Sessions (1981)

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A1 	Two Cigarettes In The Dark	2:55
A2 	What Shall I Do?	2:39
A3 	Soon	3:01
A4 	Where The Mountains Meet The Sea	2:50
A5 	A Lonely Singing Fool	2:43
A6 	Long May We Love	2:55
B1 	Miss Otis Regrets (She's Unable To Lunch Today)	3:10
B2 	Be Still My Heart	3:02
B3 	Stars Fell On Alabama	2:56
B4 	Two Little Flies On A Lump Of Sugar	2:47
B5 	I Travel Alone	3:00

Alto Saxophone, Guitar – Noel "Chappie" D'Amato
Alto Saxophone, Violin – Stan Andrews
Bass – Tiny Stock
Clarinet, Alto Saxophone, Flute – E.O. Pogson
Clarinet, Tenor Saxophone, Oboe – Allan Warner
Conductor, Trumpet – Jack Jackson
Drums – Percy Hampton
Orchestra – Jack Jackson & His Orchestra
Piano – Harry Rubens
Trombone – Eric Tann, Tony Thorpe
Trumpet – Freddy Mann, Harry Macfarlane
Violin – Colly Eisner, Dave Esher
Vocals - Alberta Hunter

 

This handsome album is a bit of an oddity. Alberta Hunter, famous as a jazz-oriented blues singer in the 1920s, reinvented herself as a sophisticated stage singer in London. Her 11 recordings with Jack Jackson's society dance orchestra in 1934 are very straight, outside of jazz and somewhat dated today. Whether it be "Two Cigarettes in the Dark," "Miss Otis Regrets" or "Two Little Flies on a Lump of Sugar," Hunter interprets the romantic ballads like a cabaret singer. So, although this reissue was perfectly done (with extensive liner notes), there is little here to interest jazz listeners. ---Scott Yanow, AllMusic Reviews

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Alberta Hunter Fri, 17 May 2019 15:02:45 +0000
Alberta Hunter - Young Alberta Hunter, The 20'S And 30'S (1996) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/968-alberta-hunter/23066-alberta-hunter-young-alberta-hunter-the-20s-and-30s-1996.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/968-alberta-hunter/23066-alberta-hunter-young-alberta-hunter-the-20s-and-30s-1996.html Alberta Hunter - Young Alberta Hunter, The 20'S And 30'S (1996)

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1. You Can't Tell The Difference After Dark
2. Second Hand Man
3. Send Me A Man
4. Chirpin' The Blues
5. Down Hearted Blues, 1939
6. I'll See You Go
7. Fine & Mellow
8. Yelpin' The Blues
9. Someday Sweetheart
10. The Love I Have For You
11. My Castle's Rockin'
12. Boogie Woogie Swing
13. I Won't Let You Down
14. Take Your Big Hands Off
15. He's Got A Punch Like Joe Louis
16. How Long, Sweet Daddy, How Long?
17. Down Hearted Blues, 1922
18. Gonna Have You, Ain't Gonna Leave You Alone
19. You Can Have My Man If He Comes To See You, Too
20. Bring It With You When You Come
21. Nobody Knows The Way I Feel Dis Mornin'
22. Early Every Morn
23. I'm Going To See My Ma

Alberta Hunter 	Primary Artist, Vocals
Lil Armstrong  Piano
Louis Armstrong 	Cornet, Guest Artist
Buster Bailey 	Clarinet
Sidney Bechet 	Clarinet, Sax (Soprano)
Eubie Blake 	Piano
George Brashear 	Trombone
Wellman Braud 	Bass
Al Casey 	Guitar
Elmer Chambers 	Cornet
Buddy Christian 	Banjo
Charlie Dixon 	Banjo
Ernest Elliott 	Clarinet
Eubie Blake's Orchestra 	
Henderson's Novelty Orchestra 	
Fletcher Henderson 	 Piano
Fletcher Henderson's Dance Orchestra 
Eddie Heywood 	Guest Artist, Piano
Eddie Heywood & His Jazz Six 	Primary Artist
Charlie Irvis 	Trombone
Leroy Jones 	Clarinet
Al Matthews 	Bass
The Red Onion Jazz Babies 	
Don Redman 	Clarinet
Charlie Shavers 	Trumpet
Fats Waller 	Organ, Piano

 

Alberta Hunter's comeback after 20 years off the music scene was quite inspiring. She was (along with Sippie Wallace) virtually the only classic blues singer of the 1920s still active during part of the 1980s, and her four Columbia albums (of which this was the third) are surprisingly strong. With able backing by the Gerald Cook quartet, trumpeter Doc Cheatham, trombonist Vic Dickenson and tenor-saxophonist Budd Johnson, Alberta Hunter sings some standards (including "Some of These Days," "The Glory of Love" and "I Cried for You"), a few religious hymns ("Ezekiel Saw the Wheel" and "Give Me That Old Time Religion"), the Yiddish tune "Ich Hob Dich Tzufil Lieba" and her own "Alberta's Blues" and "The Love I Have for You." ---Scott Yanow, All Music Review

 

As 82-years old blues survivor Alberta Hunter was artist with a heart big as the world (check her "Amtrak blues" CD) - howewer,as a young woman she was closer to Vaudeville/Cabaret music that made rich customers of the night clubs giggle,than to real passionate blues that Ma Rainey and Bessie Smith recorded at the same time.Closer in spirit to "whitened" and forgotten Ethel Waters than to famous black blues mama's Hunter used heavy vibratto and her half-spoken ditties made her sound like old woman when she just started her career!This compilation is showcase of her early successes but although she wrotte "Downhearted Blues" and sang "Nobody Knows The Way I Feel This Morning",Bessie Smith and later Dinah Washington mopped the floor with her.If you like irresistible work of older Alberta Hunter,this CD is just curiosity that showes how much she progressed in the meantime.Of all the blues diva's from 20-es I still havent found anybody who can match Ma Rainey and great Bessie Smith,all others were just imitation. ---Sasha, amazon.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Alberta Hunter Thu, 22 Feb 2018 14:19:34 +0000
Alberta Hunter, Lucille Hegamin, Victoria Spivey - Song We Taught Your Mother (1962) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/968-alberta-hunter/18677-alberta-hunter-lucille-hegamin-victoria-spivey-song-we-taught-your-mother-1962.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/968-alberta-hunter/18677-alberta-hunter-lucille-hegamin-victoria-spivey-song-we-taught-your-mother-1962.html Alberta Hunter, Lucille Hegamin, Victoria Spivey - Song We Taught Your Mother (1962)

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A1 	–Alberta Hunter 	I Got Myself A Workin' Man 	3:14
A2 	–Lucille Hegamin 	St. Louis Blues 	3:30
A3 	–Victoria Spivey 	Black Snake Blues 	4:06
A4 	–Alberta Hunter 	I Got A Mind To Ramble 	2:39
A5 	–Lucille Hegamin 	You'll Want My Love 	2:56
A6 	–Victoria Spivey 	Going Blues 	4:44
B1 	–Alberta Hunter 	You Gotta Reap Just What You Sow 	2:40
B2 	–Lucille Hegamin 	Arkansas Blues 	3:37
B3 	–Victoria Spivey 	I Got The Blues So Bad 	3:07
B4 	–Alberta Hunter 	Chirpin' The Blues 	3:29
B5 	–Lucille Hegamin 	Has Anybody Seen My Corine 	4:35
B6 	–Victoria Spivey 	Let Him Beat Me 	2:57

Buster Bailey - Clarinet
Gene Brooks - Drums
Sidney DeParis 	- Trumpet, Tuba
Henry Goodwin - Trumpet
Lucille Hegamin - Vocals
J.C. Higginbotham – Trombone
Alberta Hunter 	- Vocals
Cliff Jackson - Piano
Cecil Scott - Clarinet, Sax (Tenor)
Zutty Singleton 	- Drums
Willie "The Lion" Smith - Piano
Victoria Spivey - Piano, Vocals

 

Although Alberta Hunter, who had briefly come out of retirement, gets first billing on this CD reissue, in reality she shares the spotlight with two other veterans of the 1920s: Lucille Hegamin and Victoria Spivey. Each of the singers is featured on four songs apiece while backed by such top players as clarinetist Buster Bailey, trombonist J.C. Higginbottham, and Cliff Jackson or Willie "The Lion" Smith on piano. Hunter is in superior form on such numbers as "You Gotta Reap Just What You Sow" and "I Got a Mind to Ramble," although she would soon be out of music for another 15 years, continuing her work as a nurse. Hegamin (who had not recorded since 1932) was having a brief last hurrah, despite sounding good, and Spivey, reviving her "Black Snake Blues," would soon be launching her own Spivey label. This is a historic and enjoyable set recommended to both classic jazz and blues collectors. --- Scott Yanow, allmusic.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Alberta Hunter Thu, 29 Oct 2015 17:01:24 +0000
Alberta Hunter - Look for The Silver Lining (1982) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/968-alberta-hunter/12251-alberta-hunter-look-for-the-silver-lining-1982.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/968-alberta-hunter/12251-alberta-hunter-look-for-the-silver-lining-1982.html Alberta Hunter - Look for The Silver Lining (1982)

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A1		Without Rhythm	3:10
A2		Look For The Silver Lining	3:30
A3		Now I'm Satisfied	3:16
A4		Georgia On My Mind	3:12
A5		J'ai Deux Amours	2:35
B1		Black Man	3:41
B2		He's Funny That Way	3:12
B3		Somebody Loves Me	2:51
B4		On The Sunny Side Of The Street	2:57
B5		Somebody Told Me So	3:25

Backing Vocals – Diane Wilson (tracks: A3), George Tipton (tracks: A3), Maeretha Stewart (tracks: A3)
Bass – Jimmy Lewis (tracks: A1), Vishnu Wood
Drums – Butch Miles
Guitar – Billy Butler
Organ – Frank Anderson (tracks: A3)
Tambourine – Lincoln Clapp (tracks: A3)
Tenor Saxophone – Budd Johnson
Trombone – Vic Dickenson
Trumpet – Doc Cheatham, Jonah Jones

 

Classic blues singer Alberta Hunter's final recording (made when she was 87, two years before her death) is as powerful as her previous three Columbia albums. The legendary delightful singer puts plenty of feeling into "Look for the Silver Lining," "He's Funny That Way," "Somebody Loves Me" and four of her originals. As was true of each of her final sets, Hunter is joined by the Gerald Cook quartet and several veteran horn players (trumpeters Doc Cheatham and Jonah Jones, trombonist Vic Dickenson and tenorman Budd Johnson), all of whom sound quite happy to be supporting the ancient yet ageless singer. ---Scott Yanow, allmusic.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Alberta Hunter Thu, 24 May 2012 16:44:15 +0000
Alberta Hunter - Downhearted Blues (1981) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/968-alberta-hunter/12236-alberta-hunter-downhearted-blues-1981.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/968-alberta-hunter/12236-alberta-hunter-downhearted-blues-1981.html Alberta Hunter - Downhearted Blues (1981)

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01. My Castle's Rockin' 
02. The Love I Have For You 
03. I Got Rhythm 
04. Downhearted Blues 
05. Time Waits For No One 
06. I'm Havin' A Good Time 
07. Two-Fisted Double-Jointed Rough And Ready Man 
08. The Sarktown Strutter's Ball 
09. Sometimes I'm Happy
10. I've Got A Mind To Ramble 
11. Old Fashioned Love 
12. You Can't Tell The Difference After Dark 
13. Remember My Name 
14. When You're Smiling (The Whole World Smiles With You) 
15. Georgia On My Mind 
16. Handy Man 
17. Never Knew My Kisses
18. You're Welcome To Come Back Home

Gerald Cook- Piano
Jimmy Lewis- Bass
Alberta Hunter- Vocals

 

Few singers have a story as long and varied as that of Alberta Hunter, whose career spanned most of the 20th century. From the dawn of the classic blues era, through two world wars, a long hiatus, and a fresh start shortly before her death in 1984, Hunter stuck to the rich vocals, full expression, and classical style. Although this recording was made during her 80s, when she came out of retirement to sing at the Cookery in Greenwich Village, her voice, having lessened some in power, had lost none of its charm. The woman who counted such legends as Bessie Smith, Mamie Smith, and Ma Rainey among her contemporaries, and who wrote Bessie Smith’s classic hit “Downhearted Blues,” here delivers an appealing set of classic blues, including a stunning rendition of “I Got Rhythm.” ---Genevieve Williams, allmusic.com

 

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Alberta Hunter Mon, 21 May 2012 17:19:42 +0000
Alberta Hunter - Amtrack Blues (1978) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/968-alberta-hunter/7769-alberta-hunter-amtrack-blues-1978.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/968-alberta-hunter/7769-alberta-hunter-amtrack-blues-1978.html Alberta Hunter - Amtrack Blues (1978)

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1. The Darktown Strutters' Ball 5:20
2. Nobody Knows You When You're Down And Out 3:48 play
3. I'm Having A Good Time 2:35
4. Always 3:41
5. My Handy Man Ain't Handy No More 3:46
6. Amtrak Blues 3:21 play
7. Old Fashioned Love 4:11
8. Sweet Georgia Brown 4:09
9. A Good Man Is Hard To Find 3:56
10. I've Got A Mind To Ramble 4:13
Bass, Contractor – Aaron Bell Drums – Jackie Williams Guitar – Billy Butler Piano, Leader – Gerald Cook Tenor Saxophone, Clarinet – Norris Turney Tenor Saxophone, Flute – Frank Wess Trombone – Vic Dickenson Trumpet – "Doc" Cheatham

 

Amazing woman,Alberta Hunter recorded this wonderful album at the age of 83 - great survivor of the original blues craze of 1920's,she was a contemporary of Bessie Smith ( Bessie's very first hit "Downhearted blues" was actually written by Alberta Hunter!) and all the other blues greats,and somehow she endured all the way up to 1978. when she recorded "Amtrak Blues".Yes,you can tell its an old voice,but she had such a character that made listen pure fun - her version of this old standards are simply undescribable,she sounds like great old lady,sometimes even dirty (You never heard "My Handy Man" if you didnt hear this one - in comparison,Ethel Waters version from 1920's is simply nice little song,Alberta makes a listener blush).Interesting,I found this late Alberta Hunter period much interesting then her younger phase.In the 1920's and 1930's she was never such a character as here - just as late albums by Ida Cox,Sippie Wallace or Victora Spivey shows,these women actually got better with age.This album is really heart-warming,showes that character never dies,age doesnt mean anything and one is young as he feels.

These 'standards' are anything but; Alberta Hunter's versions are unbeatable. She has that kind of voice and rhythm that seem so natural and yet, like Billie Holiday, defy the human range thus placing her in the pantheon of jazz greats. She is earthy yet refined and completely in touch with the band, she moans and cries at places that you'll find yourself wondering how she got there. "Darktown Strutters Ball", "Georgia Brown" and the intensely down and dirty "My Handyman" are sensual, comic and dramatically original-your body will react- guaranteed. Unpredictably fresh, this late great senior citizen packs all she's got and all we need, right in to each piece. I have given this CD as a gift to many people and they have all been smitten and grateful. ---amazon.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Alberta Hunter Mon, 27 Dec 2010 20:02:41 +0000
Alberta Hunter - The Glory Of Alberta Hunter (1982) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/968-alberta-hunter/3173-glory-of-alberta-hunter.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/968-alberta-hunter/3173-glory-of-alberta-hunter.html Alberta Hunter - The Glory Of Alberta Hunter (1982)

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01 - Ezequiel Saw The Wheel
02 - I’ve Had Enough (Alberta’s Blues)
03 - Wrap Your Troubles In Dreams
04 - Some of These Days
05 - The Glory of Love
06 - You Can’t Tell The Difference After Dark
07 - I Love You Much Too Much
08 - I Cried For You
09 - The Love I Have For You
10 - Sometimes I’m Happy
11 - Give Me That Old Time Religion
Bass – Jimmy Lewis Drums – Butch Miles Guitar – Billy Butler Leader, Piano – Gerald Cook Tenor Saxophone [Tenor Sax] – Budd Johnson Trombone – Vic Dickenson Trumpet – Doc Cheatham Vocals - Alberta Hunter

 

Alberta Hunter's comeback after 20 years off the music scene was quite inspiring. She was (along with Sippie Wallace) virtually the only classic blues singer of the 1920s still active during part of the 1980s, and her four Columbia albums (of which this was the third) are surprisingly strong. With able backing by the Gerald Cook quartet, trumpeter Doc Cheatham, trombonist Vic Dickenson and tenor-saxophonist Budd Johnson, Alberta Hunter sings some standards (including "Some of These Days," "The Glory of Love" and "I Cried for You"), a few religious hymns ("Ezekiel Saw the Wheel" and "Give Me That Old Time Religion"), the Yiddish tune "Ich Hob Dich Tzufil Lieba" and her own "Alberta's Blues" and "The Love I Have for You." ---Scott Yanow, All Music Guide

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Alberta Hunter Tue, 19 Jan 2010 14:30:40 +0000
Alberta Hunter with Lovie Austin and Her Blues Serenaders (1961) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/968-alberta-hunter/2086-hunterserenades.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/968-alberta-hunter/2086-hunterserenades.html Alberta Hunter with Lovie Austin and Her Blues Serenaders (1961)


01. St. Louis Blues 
02. Moanin' Low (Alberta Hunter) 
03. Downhearted Blues (Alberta Hunter) 
04. Now I'm Satisfied (Alberta Hunter)
05. Sweet Georgia Brown (Lovie Austin) 
06. You Better Change (Alberta Hunter)
07. C-Jam Blues (Lovie Austin) 
08. Streets Paved With Gold (Alberta Hunter) 
09. Gallon Stomp (Lovie Austin) 
10. I Will Always Be In Love With You (Alberta Hunter)

Alberta Hunter (vocals); 
Lovie Austin (vocals, piano); 
Jimmy Archey (trombone); 
Darnell Howard (clarinet); 
Pops Foster (bass); 
Jasper Taylor (drums).

 

This CD reissue is notable for two main reasons. It finds Alberta Hunter (who had retired from music in 1954 to become a nurse and who in the interim had only recorded once, two weeks earlier) in peak form on such numbers as "St. Louis Blues," "Downhearted Blues" and "You Better Change." In addition, it was pianist Lovie Austin's first recording in a couple decades; she was nearly 74 at the time and working as pianist at a Chicago dancing school. Austin's "Blues Serenaders" (a quintet also including trombonist Jimmy Archey, clarinetist Darnell Howard, bassist Pops Foster and drummer Jasper Taylor) has some concise solo space on the vocal pieces and takes three numbers (including Austin's "Gallion Stomp") as instrumentals. A well-conceived and historic set. ---Scott Yanow, AMG

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Alberta Hunter Tue, 27 Oct 2009 15:46:50 +0000