Blues The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/837.html Tue, 23 Jul 2019 01:09:39 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Howlin' Wolf ‎– The Howlin' Wolf Album (1969) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/837-howlinwolf/24703-howlin-wolf--the-howlin-wolf-album-1969.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/837-howlinwolf/24703-howlin-wolf--the-howlin-wolf-album-1969.html Howlin' Wolf ‎– The Howlin' Wolf Album (1969)

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A1 	Spoonful 	3:48
A2 	Tail Dragger 	4:20
A3 	Smokestack Lightning 	5:54
A4 	Moanin' At Midnight 	3:13
A5 	Built For Comfort 	5:07
B1 	The Red Rooster 	3:48
B2 	Evil 	4:06
B3 	Down In The Bottom 	2:43
B4 	Three Hundred Pounds Of Joy 	2:34
B5 	Back Door Man 	6:17

Drums – Morris Jennings
Electric Bass – Louis Satterfield
Electric Guitar – Hubert Sumlin, Phil Upchurch (tracks: B2, B4, B5), Roland Faulkner
Electric Guitar, Guitar [Bowed] – Pete Cosey
Flute – Donald Myrick (tracks: A3)
Saxophone [Electric] – Gene Barge (tracks: A3)
Vocals, Harmonica – Howlin' Wolf 

 

By 1968, Chicago blues was a dying art form and the Chess imprint desperately needed a shot in the arm. Marshal Chess, son of label founder Leonard, tackled the problem by forcing his two biggest stars, Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf, to record psychedelic albums. The results were messy affairs that buried their creators’ talents under layers of wah-wah and fuzz effects in the hope of sounding hip.

While Muddy’s Electric Mud (almost) succeeded because his wide grooves were easily translated into psych riffs, Wolf’s off-kilter stomp proved too eccentric for the session musicians, who replaced them with stale vamps and superfluous effects. There are a few occasions where singer and band synch up, such as the blistering remakes of Smokestack Lightning and Evil but, for the most part, he sounds uncomfortable.

Wolf hated the results, prompting Chess’ bizarre decision to address the issue on the album’s sleeve in bold text stating “This is Howlin’ Wolf’s new album. He doesn’t like it. He didn’t like his electric guitar at first either.” Four decades later, the album remains awful, but retains a curious novelty factor. Listeners in search of a psyched-out Howlin’ Wolf would be better off checking out early Captain Beefheart. ---Mat Croft, recordcollectormag.com

 

Born in Aberdeen, Mississippi, Chester Burnett, better known by his stage name Howlin' Wolf, helped modernize the country blues with his powerful vocal style and harmonica work and his ability to connect with an audience no matter what stage he prowled. This album, though, originally released in 1969 on the Chess Records subsidiary Cadet Records, is hardly typical Wolf, and the bluesman himself hated it, which may in some way have contributed to the album's odd cult standing. The idea was as simple as it was probably misguided, an attempt to modernize Wolf's sound into psychedelic Jimi Hendrix land, and the results were, well, odd at best, and laughable and lamentable at worst, and through no fault of Wolf's, who obviously tried his best to make sense of all of it. Howlin' Wolf completists will want this for its novelty value, but it's far from an accurate portrait of this powerful bluesman's talent and appeal. ---Steve Leggett, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Howlin' Wolf Sun, 20 Jan 2019 15:10:12 +0000
Howlin' Wolf - 30 Most Slow Blues (2017) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/837-howlinwolf/23401-howlin-wolf-30-most-slow-blues-2017.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/837-howlinwolf/23401-howlin-wolf-30-most-slow-blues-2017.html Howlin' Wolf - 30 Most Slow Blues (2017)

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01. Coon on the Moon
02. Louise
03. Speak Now Woman
04. Trying to Forget You
05. Sitting on Top of the World
06. Stop Using Me
07. I Ain't Superstitious
08. All My Life
09. My Baby Walked Off
10. My Country Sugar Mama
11. Goin' Down Slow
12. Watergate Blues
13. Chocolate Drop
14. Can't Stay Here
15. Color And Kind
16. Bluebird
17. Dorothy Mae
18. Tell Me What I've Done
19. Moanin' At Midnight
20. My Last Affair
21. Smokestack Lightning
22. Sweet Woman (I Got a Woman)
23. Decoration Day
24. California Blues
25. Oh Red
26. No Place To Go
27. Evil
28. I'm Leaving You (Commit A Crime)
29. How Many More Years
30. Built for Comfort

 

Blues singer, guitarist, harmonica player. A key figure in bridging the early Delta Blues with the more modern Electric Blues. His tutelage on the Mississippi Delta included guitar and showmanship from Charley Patton and harmonica teachings from Sonny Boy Williamson . By the end of the 1930's he was a fixture on the Southern Club scene. He was inducted into the U.S. Army on April 9, 1941 and discharged on November 3, 1943. He then moved near West Memphis, Arkansas. In 1948 he formed a band which included guitarists Willie Johnson & Matt "Guitar" Murphy, harmonica player Little Junior Parker, and drummer Willie Steele. In 1951, Sam Phillips recorded several songs by Howlin' Wolf at his Memphis Recording Service, and he became a local celebrity. After Leonard Chess secured his contract, The Wolf relocated to Chicago in 1952. It was in Chicago that his legendary status was secured. Playing with prominent blues musicians such as Willie Dixon, Jimmy Rogers and his longtime guitarist Hubert Sumlin, his everchanging lineups remained stellar thanks in part to Burnetts' admirable policies of paying his musicians well and on time, even including unemployment insurance and Social Security contributions, basically unheard of among his peers. Over the years many of his songs have been interpreted by rock bands, including "Little Red Rooster", "Back Door Man", "Killing Floor", & "Spoonful". Howlin Wolf, with his Memphis and Chicago recordings, his status and influence, surely is one of the vital links between Blues and Rock.

Inducted into Rock And Roll Hall of Fame in 1991 (Early Influence). ---discogs.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Howlin' Wolf Fri, 27 Apr 2018 14:06:26 +0000
Howlin' Wolf - The Complete RPM & Chess Singles As & Bs - 1951-1962 (2014) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/837-howlinwolf/21675-howlin-wolf-the-complete-rpm-a-chess-singles-as-a-bs-1951-1962-2014.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/837-howlinwolf/21675-howlin-wolf-the-complete-rpm-a-chess-singles-as-a-bs-1951-1962-2014.html Howlin' Wolf - The Complete RPM & Chess Singles As & Bs - 1951-1962 (2014)

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CD 1
1. Riding In The Moonlight
2. Morning At Midnight
3. Passing By Blues
4. Crying At Daybreak
5. Moanin ‘At Midnight
6. How Many More Years
7. My Baby Stole Off
8. I Want Your Picture
9. Wolf Is At Your Door
10. Howlin ‘Wolf Boogie
11. Getting Old And Grey
12. Mr Highway Man
13. Saddle My Pony
14. Worried All The Time
15. Oh, Red
16. My Last Affair
17. All Night Boogie
18. I Love My Baby
19. No Place To Go
20. Rockin ‘Daddy
21. Baby How Long
22. Evil Is Going On
23. I’ll Be Around
24. Forty-Four
25. Who Will Be Next
26. I Have A Little Girl

CD 2
1. Come To Me Baby
2. Do not Mess With My Baby
3. Smokestack Lightning
4. You Can not Be Beat
5. I Asked For Water
6. So Glad
7. Goin ‘Back Home
8. My Life
9. Somebody In My Home
10. Nature
11. Poor Boy
12. Sittin ‘On Top Of The World
13. I Did not Know
14. Moaning For My Baby
15. I’m Leaving You
16. Change My Way
17. Howlin ‘Blues
18. I Better Go Now
19. I’ve Been Abused
20. Mister Airplane Man
21. You Gonna Wreck My Life
22. The Natchez Burning
23. Who’s Been Talking
24. Tell Me
25. Spoonful
26. Howlin ‘For My Baby
27. Wang Dang Doodle

CD 3
1. Back Door Man
2. Little Baby
3. Down In The Bottom
4. Shake For Me
5. The Red Rooster
6. You’ll Be Mine
7. Goin ‘Down Slow
8. Just Like I Treat You
9. I Is not Superstious
10. Mama’s Baby
11. Do The Do
+
12. Keep What You Got
13. California Blues
14. California Boogie
15. My Troubles And Me
16. Worried About My Baby
17. Brown Skin Woman
18. House Rockin ‘Boogie
19. Driving This Highway
20. The Sun Is Rising
21. Stealing My Clothes
22. I’m The Wolf
23. Highway My Friend
24. Hold Your Money
25. Stay Here Till My Baby Comes Back
26. Crazy About You Baby
27. Streamline Woman

Jerome Arnold 	Bass
Fred Below 	Drums
Junior Blackman 	Drums
J.T. Brown 	Sax (Tenor)
Lee Cooper 	Guitar
Willie Dixon 	Bass, Composer, Drums
Adolph Duncan 	Sax (Tenor)
Alfred Elkins 	Bass
Henry Gray 	Piano
Howlin' Wolf 	Guitar, Harmonica, Piano, Primary Artist, Sax (Tenor), Vocals
L.C. Hubert 	Piano
Willie Johnson 	Bass, Drums, Guitar
Johnny Jones 	Piano
Hosea Lee Kennard 	Piano
Sam Lay 	Drums
S.P. Leary 	Drums
Abb Locke 	Sax (Tenor)
L.D. McGhee 	Guitar
Calvin Newborn 	Guitar
Earl Phillips 	Drums
Freddy Robinson 	Guitar
Jimmy Rogers 	Guitar
Walter Smith 	Trombone
Abraham Smothers 	Guitar
Otis Smokey Smothers 	Guitar
Otis Spann 	Piano
Willie Steel 	Drums
Hubert Sumlin 	Guitar
Charles Taylor 	Sax (Tenor)
Ike Turner 	Piano
Albert Williams 	Piano
Jody Williams 	Guitar 

 

With his larger-than-life persona, roaring vocals, and the raw, skittering guitar lines of Hubert Sumlin behind him, Howlin’ Wolf turned out dozens of stellar Chicago blues singles for RPM and Chess Records between 1951 and 1962, including “Smokestack Lightnin’,” "Spoonful," "Red Rooster," and the magnificent “Killing Floor,” among many others. All of these, along with his other classic and essential singles (both A- and B-sides) from the first decade of his career, are collected here in this expansive, three-disc, 80-track set, which also includes several sides recorded at sessions during this period but never released. ---Steve Leggett, AllMusic Review

 

Chester Burnett, better known as Howlin' Wolf, was one of the most important and influential figures in Chicago Blues through the 1950s, and along with Muddy Waters helped to establish the electric blues style that laid the foundations for rock music in subsequent decades. With his imposing physical presence and loud, almost fearsome voice, he was a powerful and impressive performer, who wrote and popularised songs which have become classic standards of the genre, like ""Spoonful"", ""Smokestack Lightning"", ""Killing Floor"" and ""Red Rooster"", which became fixtures in the repertoire of bands like The Rolling Stones, who very much championed his cause and widened his reputation in the latter years of his career. This collection brings together both sides of all the singles he released through the RPM and Chess labels during the first hugely important decade of his career, along with bonus tracks comprising recordings made at sessions during this period which were not released as singles at the time. It's a great-value 80-track 3-CD set, which showcases one of the major personalities of the blues. ---Editorial Reviews, amazon.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Howlin' Wolf Sat, 27 May 2017 14:52:08 +0000
Howlin' Wolf - Mississippi Boy (2002) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/837-howlinwolf/16718-howlin-wolf-mississippi-boy-2002.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/837-howlinwolf/16718-howlin-wolf-mississippi-boy-2002.html Howlin' Wolf - Mississippi Boy (2002)

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1. Baby Ride With Me
2. How Many More Years
3. California Boogie
4. Looka Here Baby
5. Smile At Me
6. My Baby Walked Off
7. My Troubles And Me
8. Mr. Highway Man
9. Chocolate Drop
10. Everybody’s In The Mood
11. Color And Kind
12. Bluebird
13. My Last Affair
14. Dorothy Mae
15. Oh Red
16. California Blues

 

Looking over the long history of blues, there have been many performers who took a somewhat lopsided approach to making their mark. Think for a moment of Screamin' Jay Hawkins, who entered the stage encased in a coffin, or Eddie "Guitar Slim" Jones, known for painting his guitar and his coiffed hairdo, to match a new suit of clothes. Of everyone though, the one who managed chaos and pure mayhem most often, was Howlin' Wolf. Born with a voice that was as rough as 30 grit sandpaper, he took a deafening approach to blues, and his recordings from his primal Memphis days, to the greased Chess sessions of the fifties and sixties, show a man who had little use for boundaries. Simply put, the Wolf was perhaps the scariest creature ever to cradle a guitar, or blow harmonica. Built of a massive frame of over six feet, and well over the 240 pound mark, Chester Arthur Burnett, from Aberdeen, MS, could shake you to your soul with one phrase, one sentence, one word.

With the number of labels issuing blues today, it's sometimes difficult to know what to buy, but this budget-priced, 16 track, 45 minute disc, from yet another little known imprint, is a great beginning. Wolf first recorded in Memphis for Sam Phillips, who owned and ran Sun Studios, and it was Phillips who leased masters to both the Chess brothers in Chicago, and the West Coast Bihari boys, simultaneously. While Wolf's 78's showed up for a time on both the Chess and RPM logos, the money behind Chess ultimately won out, and Wolf moved north to the Windy City. Before he left the south though, he managed some of the tightest, inspired sides ever to burst out of Memphis. Backed by Willie Steel's riveting and insistent drums, solid piano from Albert Williams, L.C. Hubert, or others, and the distorted abnormalities of Willie Johnson's guitar, Howlin' Wolf tore through his early recordings like a rabid animal through flesh. While his harmonica style bore similarities to Sonny Boy Williamson, though rougher in texture and phrasing, Wolf's true instrument was a voice unlike any other of his time.

From the first track, "Baby Ride With Me," to the closing of "California Blues," these 16 sides show complete disdain for any sort of manners. Wolf was at home with a hard-charging band behind him, taking his harmonicas out for brief spitfire phrases, and with the crew encouraging him, as in "How Many More Years," he poured on the steam. "Look A Here Baby" starts with a Duke Ellington flavor, and within seconds, Willie Johnson transforms the song from a sweet cocktail-blues to rude and twisted Memphis jump tune. Wolf steps in and talks his way through the proceedings picking up his harp for some added interest, but it's the hard-driving Johnson who takes control here. The amount of horsepower generated by Howlin' Wolf and his cronies back in 1952 and '53, when these tracks were cut, is at times hard to fathom. From the unbelievably raw wickedness of "Mr. Highway Man," to the back-and-forth rhythm of "Color And Kind," this is Memphis Blues at its best.

Sam Phillips was just as happy to record rockabilly, swing, blues, or gospel, and his decision to roll tape for Howlin' Wolf, at Ike Turner's request, was a move later realized as genius. Phillips' was too small an outfit to fully exploit Wolf and others he recorded, but by leasing masters to various labels in bigger cities, he brought himself income, and a better future for many of his artists. Thankfully, Chester Burnett lived long enough to reap the rewards and adulation of the young rockers, Clapton, Page, Jagger, Richards, et al, and the throngs who flocked to see him in his later years. His plaster-shattering, teeth-rattling early work, perhaps his best for its reckless abandon, is the place to start. --- Craig Ruskey, mnblues.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Howlin' Wolf Thu, 16 Oct 2014 15:56:48 +0000
Howlin Wolf – The Real Folk Blues (1966) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/837-howlinwolf/16644-howlin-wolf--the-real-folk-blues-1966.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/837-howlinwolf/16644-howlin-wolf--the-real-folk-blues-1966.html Howlin Wolf – The Real Folk Blues (1966)

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01. Killing Floor - 2:49
02. Louise - 2:42
03. Poor Boy - 2:33
04. Sittin' On Top Of The World - 2:31
05. Nature - 2:46
06. My Country Sugar Mama - 2:34
07. Tail Dragger (Willie Dixon) - 2:56
08. Three Hundred Pounds Of Joy (Willie Dixon) - 3:02
09. Natchez Burning - 2:09
10. Built For Comfort (Willie Dixon) - 2:38
11. Ooh Baby, Hold Me -	2:37
12. Tell Me What I've Done - 2:47
13. Smokestack Lightning - 3:05
14. Hidden Charms (Willie Dixon) - 2:19

- Howlin' Wolf - vocals, guitar, harmonica
- Willie Dixon - bass
- Buddy Guy - bass
- Andrew Palmer - electric bass
- Willie Johnson - guitar
- Otis Smokey Smothers - guitar
- Jody Williams - guitar
- Johnny Jones - piano
- Hosea Lee Kennard - piano
- Lafayette Leake - piano
- Junior Blackman - drums
- Sam Lay - drums
- Earl Phillips - drums
- Donald Hawkins - baritone saxophone 
- J.T. Brown - tenor saxophone
- Arnold Rogers - tenor saxophone

 

This was originally released by Chess in 1966 to capitalize on the then-current folk music boom. The music, however -- a collection of Howlin' Wolf singles from 1956 to 1966 -- is full-blown electric, featuring a nice sampling of Wolf originals with a smattering of Willie Dixon tunes. Some of the man's best middle period work is aboard here; "Killing Floor," "Louise," the hair-raisingly somber "Natchez Burning," and Wolf's version of the old standard "Sitting on Top of the World," which would become his set closer in later years. The Mobile Fidelity version sounds as sonically sharp as anything you've ever heard by this artist and its heftier price tag is somewhat justified by the inclusion of two bonus cuts. But those on a budget who just want the music minus the high-minded audiophile concerns will be happy to note that this is also available as a Chess budget reissue. [Originally released in 1966, the LP was reissued on an import-only Japanese CD in 2004.] --- Cub Koda, Rovi

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Howlin' Wolf Sat, 04 Oct 2014 15:48:02 +0000
Howlin' Wolf - More Real Folk Blues (1967/2007) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/837-howlinwolf/15221-howlin-wolf-more-real-folk-blues-19672007.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/837-howlinwolf/15221-howlin-wolf-more-real-folk-blues-19672007.html Howlin' Wolf - More Real Folk Blues (1967/2007)

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1 Just My Kind 	2:50 	
2 I've Got A Woman 	2:53 	
3 Work For Your Money 	2:10 	
4 I'll Be Around 	3:11 	
5 You Can't Be Beat 	3:06 	
6 You Gonna Wreck My Life 	2:34 	
7 I Love My Baby 	2:55 	
8 Neighbors 	2:43 	
9 I'm The Wolf 	2:47 	
10 Rocking Daddy 	3:00 	
11 Who Will Be Next? 	2:30 	
12 I Have A Little Girl 	2:35

Musicians:
Howlin’ Wolf – guitar, harmonica, vocals
Hubert Sumlin, Jody Williams, Willie Johnson, Lee Cooper  – guitar
Willie Dixon – bass
Otis Spann, Henry Gray, Hosea Lee Kennard – piano
Earl Philips, S.P. Leary – drums

 

The Real Folk Blues series on Chess wasn't really folk, but titled that way, perhaps to gain the attention of young white listeners who had started to get turned on to the blues during the 1960s folk revival. And the Howlin' Wolf volumes in the series were not particularly more folk-oriented than his other Chess recordings, but more or less arbitrary selections of tracks that he'd done from the mid-'50s to the mid-'60s. It's thus also arbitrary to do a two-fer reissue of his The Real Folk Blues and More Real Folk Blues, combined here onto a single disc. That doesn't mean, though, that this isn't very good and sometimes great electric blues music. The Real Folk Blues, with tracks from 1956 to 1965, is by far the more modern of the pair in arrangements, and has a good share of classics: "Killing Floor," "Sittin' on Top of the World," "Built for Comfort," "Tail Dragger," and "Three Hundred Pounds of Joy." There were some lesser-known cuts on that record as well, never less than good and sometimes very good, like the blues-folk staple "Louise" and the driving "Poor Boy," as well as a couple brassy 1965 recordings with both Hubert Sumlin and Buddy Guy on guitars. More Real Folk Blues, in contrast, consists entirely of 1953-1955 recordings, which are considerably more lo-fi and not as stuffed with high-class memorable material. Yet these are fine raw 1950s electric blues, and occasionally superb, as on the well-known "No Place to Go" and the propulsive "Just My Kind." You might already have some or many of the 24 tracks if you have a bunch of other Howlin' Wolf collections. But a lot of these, particularly from More Real Folk Blues, don't show up on the standard best-of anthologies, so more likely than not if you only have one or two Howlin' Wolf anthologies and want more, this is a pretty good one to get. --- Richie Unterberger

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Howlin' Wolf Sun, 08 Dec 2013 17:03:50 +0000
Howlin' Wolf - The Power Of The Voice (1990) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/837-howlinwolf/12147-howlin-wolf-the-power-of-the-voice-1990.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/837-howlinwolf/12147-howlin-wolf-the-power-of-the-voice-1990.html Howlin' Wolf - The Power Of The Voice (1990)


1 I Ain't Superstitious 		
2 Sittin' On The Top Of The World 		
3 Built For Comfort 		
4 The Red Rooster 		
5 Highway 49		play 		
6 Cause Of It All 		
7 Killing Floor 		
8 Brownskin Woman 		
9 The Sun Is Rising 		
10 I'm The Wolf		play 		
11 House Rockin' Boogie 		
12 Dog Me Around 		
13 Keep What You Got 		
14 My Baby Stole Off 		
15 Crying At Daybreak 		
16 Passing By Blues 		
17 Poor Boy 		
18 Commit A Crime 		
19 Wang-dang-doodle 		
20 Do The Do 		
21 Worried About My Baby 		
22 Rockin' Daddy

 

Howlin' Wolf, 1910-76, African-American blues singer and composer, b. White Station, Miss., as Chester Arthur Burnett. Exposed to blues performers from childhood, he sang locally and organized his first band in West Memphis, Tenn., in 1948. Darkly expressive, his growling, raspy voice, accompanied by his slide guitar and harmonica, came to wider public attention with his first hit, "Moanin' at Midnight," in 1951. Moving to Chicago, he and his friend and rival Muddy Waters became major figures in the transformation of the traditional acoustic Delta blues into the amplified, contemporary, and urban electric blues. For two decades (1955-75) he made concert tours across the United States. Like Waters, he was an important influence on the Rolling Stones, with whom he performed in the mid-1960s, and other British rockers. --- Columbia Encyclopedia

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Howlin' Wolf Fri, 04 May 2012 15:54:04 +0000
Howlin' Wolf - Live and Cookin' at Alice's Revisited (1992) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/837-howlinwolf/12137-howlin-wolf-live-and-cookin-at-alices-revisited-1992.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/837-howlinwolf/12137-howlin-wolf-live-and-cookin-at-alices-revisited-1992.html Howlin' Wolf - Live and Cookin' at Alice's Revisited (1992)

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1 When I Laid Down I Was Troubled 		
2 I Didn't Know 		
3 Mean Mistreater 		
4 I Had A Dream 		play		
5 Call Me The Wolf 		
6 Don't Laugh At Me 		
7 Just Passing By		play 		
8 Sittin' On Top Of The World 		
9 The Big House 		
10 Mr. Airplane Man

Personnel:
Howlin' Wolf – vocals, guitar
Sunnyland Slim – piano
Hubert Sumlin - guitar 
L. V. Williams – guitar
David Myers – bass
Fred Below – drums

 

While Howlin' Wolf would never experience the sort of late-career renaissance enjoyed by his friend and number one competitor Muddy Waters during the mid-1970s, he could still display a measure of the electricity he once had when the spirit so moved him. Such a performance can be found on Live And Cookin' At Alice's Revisited, released in 1972 as the only live album released during Wolf's lifetime. Chess and producer Ralph Bass unknowingly captured lightning in a bottle, providing Wolf with one last shot at immortality (he would release only one more studio album, 1973's The Back Door Wolf, before his death in 1976).

Live And Cookin' At Alice's Revisited documents a January 1972 performance at a converted coffeehouse on the North side of Chicago called Alice's Revisited. For the record, Wolf was backed by his longtime musical foils – guitarist Hubert Sumlin and pianist Sunnyland Slim – as well as legendary drummer Fred Below, second guitarist L.V. Williams, former Little Walter bassist Dave Myers, and Chicago blues institution, saxophonist Eddie Shaw. It's a sad commentary on Wolf's status at the time that a few days after this now-legendary gig, Wolf and the band were opening for Alice Cooper in Los Angeles...an odd and ill-fitting pairing if ever there was one. --- Reverend Keith A. Gordon, About.com Guide

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Howlin' Wolf Wed, 02 May 2012 16:24:07 +0000
Howlin' Wolf - London Sessions - The Blues Collection Vol.7 http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/837-howlinwolf/12127-howlin-wolf-london-sessions-the-blues-collection-vol7.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/837-howlinwolf/12127-howlin-wolf-london-sessions-the-blues-collection-vol7.html Howlin' Wolf - London Sessions - The Blues Collection Vol.7

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01 - Rockin' Daddy
02 - I Ain't Superstitious
03 - Sittin' On Top Of The World
04 - Worried About My Baby
05 - What A Woman!
06 - Poor Boy
07 - Built For ComfortMB
08 - Who's Been Talking
09 - Little Red Rooster (Rehearsal)
10 - Little Red Rooster
11 - Do The Do
12 - Highway 49
13 - Wang-Dang-DoodleMB
14 - Howlin' For My Baby
15 - Smokestack Lightnin'
16 - Back Door Man
17 - Killing Floor

Personnel: 
Howlin' Wolf (vocals, acoustic guitar, harmonica); 
Eric Clapton, Hubert Sumlin (guitar); 
Jeffrey M. Carp (harmonica); 
Joe Miller, Jordan Sandke, Dennis Lansing (horns); 
Steve Winwood (piano, organ); 
Ian Stewart, Lafayette Leake, Phil Upchurch, John Simon (piano); 
Bill Wyman, Klaus Voorman (bass); 
Ringo Starr (drums); 
Charlie Watts (percussion)

 

Chester Arthur Burnett (June 10, 1910 – January 10, 1976), known as Howlin' Wolf, was an influential American blues singer, guitarist and harmonica player.

With a booming voice and looming physical presence, Burnett is commonly ranked among the leading performers in electric blues; musician and critic Cub Koda declared, "no one could match Howlin' Wolf for the singular ability to rock the house down to the foundation while simultaneously scaring its patrons out of its wits." A number of songs written or popularized by Burnett—such as "Smokestack Lightnin'", "Back Door Man", "Killing Floor" and "Spoonful"—have become blues and blues rock standards.

At 6 feet, 6 inches (198 cm) and close to 300 pounds (136 kg), he was an imposing presence with one of the loudest and most memorable voices of all the "classic" 1950s Chicago blues singers. This rough-edged, slightly fearsome musical style is often contrasted with the less crude but still powerful presentation of his contemporary and professional rival, Muddy Waters. Howlin' Wolf, Sonny Boy Williamson (Rice Miller), Little Walter Jacobs, and Muddy Waters are usually regarded in retrospect as the greatest blues artists who recorded for Chess in Chicago. Sam Phillips once remarked, "When I heard Howlin' Wolf, I said, 'This is for me. This is where the soul of man never dies.'" In 2004, Rolling Stone magazine ranked him #51 on their list of the "100 Greatest Artists of All Time". ---wiki

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Howlin' Wolf Mon, 30 Apr 2012 21:47:18 +0000
Howlin' Wolf - The Back Door Wolf (1998) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/837-howlinwolf/9534-howlin-wolf-the-back-door-wolf-1998.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/837-howlinwolf/9534-howlin-wolf-the-back-door-wolf-1998.html Howlin' Wolf - The Back Door Wolf (1998)

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01. Moving				play
02. Coon on the Moon
03. Speak Now Woman
04. Trying to Forget You
05. Stop Using Me
06. Leave Here Walking
07. The Back Door Wolf		play
08. You Turn Slick On Me
09. Watergate Blues
10. Can't Stay Here
11. Speak Now Woman (Alternate Take)

Personnel: 
Howlin' Wolf (vocals, harmonica); 
Hubert Sumlin, Willie Harris (guitar); 
Eddie Shaw (tenor saxophone); 
Detroit Jr. (piano, harpsichord); 
James Green, Andrew McMahon (bass); 
S.P. Leary (drums).

 

This, Wolf's last hurrah, is his final studio album. Cut with his regular working band, the Wolf Gang, everything here works well, despite Detroit Junior's annoying use of harpsichord on several tracks. Highlights include Eddie Shaw's "Coon on the Moon," Wolf's own "Moving" and "Stop Using Me," and both takes of "Speak Now Woman." Not the place to start a Wolf collection by any means, but a great place to end up. ---Cub Koda

 

I enjoy listening to the music on this CD very much. This is the last album recorded by the legendary blues giant Chester Burnett, better known as Howlin' Wolf. The CD notes provide a brief history of the man, the myth, the mighty, moanin' Wolf. I learned from them that, although he had been performing since the 1930s, he started his recording career at the age of 40 in 1951. It was in Memphis where he was discovered by Sam Phillips, as in Elvis. His first recording session resulted in a hit, "MOANIN' AT MIDNIGHT", a personal favourite, and landed him a contract with Leonard Chess. For twenty years begining in 1953, the Wolf made records with Chess. Although, success was late in arriving for him in the US, if you were at the Crawdaddy Club in London in the 1960's, you would have known who he was. He was one of the influences for the under-rated British group the YARDBIRDS which was a revolving door for legendary guitarists, Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck and finally, Jimmy Page. In the songs of this CD, Howlin' Wolf and Hubert Sumlin, who was his guitarist since 1954, look back over their recording career update and summarize it. As much as this is a Howlin' Wolf album, it is also a Hubert Sumlin album. If you are learning to play guitar and have yet to master one of Sumlin's leads, this is a good CD to listen closely to. He balances Wolf's low growl with treble notes which bend, slide, jab and smoothly grace a pentatonic scale. Sumlin's style depends on a solid rhythm section to keep things steady, and he is working with a fine one here. CAN'T STAY HERE, SPEAK NOW WOMAN(ALT.) and TRYING TO FORGET YOU are standouts as Sumlin showpieces. The last one is a retrospective tour through Wolf's songs as that woman who is still "trying to wreck" his life has him "moanin' at midnight". If you are interested in the Chicago Blues, or would like to learn the classic guitar solos of Hubert Sumlin, this CD will be interesting to you. ---“Katja R”. amazon.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Howlin' Wolf Sat, 25 Jun 2011 08:31:04 +0000