Blues The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/828.html Thu, 08 Dec 2022 21:32:58 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Fenton Robinson ‎– Mellow Fellow (1993) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/828-fentonrobinson/23550-fenton-robinson--mellow-fellow-1993.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/828-fentonrobinson/23550-fenton-robinson--mellow-fellow-1993.html Fenton Robinson ‎– Mellow Fellow (1993)

Image could not be displayed. Check browser for compatibility.


1 	Somebody Loan Me A Dime 	
2 	The Sky Is Crying 	
3 	Smokestack Lightning 	
4 	Little Red Rooster 	
5 	Moanin' For My Baby 	
6 	Don't Start Me To Talkin' 	
7 	Stormy Monday 	
8 	Leave You In The Arms (Of Your Other Man) 	
9 	Let Me Come On Home 	
10 	The Getaway 	
11 	Sideman 	
12 	Give You Some Air 	
13 	I'm Not Through Loving You 	
14 	Mellow Fellow

Mac Gayden - Guitar
Carl Himmel - Drums
Ed Killis - Harmonica
Fenton Robinson - Guitar, Vocals
Troy Seals - 	Guitar
Bob Wilson - Keyboards 

 

His Japanese fans reverently dubbed Fenton Robinson "the mellow blues genius" because of his ultra-smooth vocals and jazz-inflected guitar work. But beneath the obvious subtlety resides a spark of constant regeneration -- Robinson tirelessly strives to invent something fresh and vital whenever he's near a bandstand. The soft-spoken Mississippi native got his career going in Memphis, where he'd moved at age 16. First, Rosco Gordon used him on a 1956 session for Duke that produced "Keep on Doggin'." The next year, Fenton made his own debut as a leader for the Bihari Brothers' Meteor label with his first reading of "Tennessee Woman." His band, the Dukes, included mentor Charles McGowan on guitar. T-Bone Walker and B.B. King were Robinson's idols.

1957 also saw Fenton team up with bassist Larry Davis at the Flamingo Club in Little Rock. Bobby Bland caught the pair there and recommended them to his boss, Duke Records prexy Don Robey. Both men made waxings for Duke in 1958, Robinson playing on Davis' classic "Texas Flood" and making his own statement with "Mississippi Steamboat." Robinson cut the original version of the often-covered Peppermint Harris-penned slow blues "As the Years Go Passing By" for Duke in 1959 with New Orleans prodigy James Booker on piano. The same date also produced a terrific "Tennessee Woman" and a marvelous blues ballad, "You've Got to Pass This Way Again." Fenton moved to Chicago in 1962, playing Southside clubs with Junior Wells, Sonny Boy Williamson, and Otis Rush and laying down the swinging "Say You're Leavin'" for USA in 1966. But it was his stunning slow blues "Somebody (Loan Me a Dime)" cut in 1967 for Palos, that insured his blues immortality. Boz Scaggs liked it so much that he covered it for his 1969 debut LP. Unfortunately, he initially also claimed he wrote the tune; much litigation followed.

John Richbourg's Sound Stage 7/Seventy 7 labels, it's safe to say, didn't really have a clue as to what Fenton Robinson's music was all about. The guitarist's 1970 Nashville waxings for the firm were mostly horrific: he wasn't even invited to play his own guitar on the majority of the horribly unsubtle rock-slanted sides. His musical mindset was growing steadily jazzier by then, not rockier.

Robinson fared a great deal better at his next substantial stop: Chicago's Alligator Records. His 1974 album Somebody Loan Me a Dime remains the absolute benchmark of his career, spotlighting his rich, satisfying vocals and free-spirited, understated guitar work in front of a rock-solid horn-driven band. By comparison, 1977's I Hear Some Blues Downstairs was a trifle disappointing despite its playful title track and a driving T-Bone tribute, "Tell Me What's the Reason." Alligator issued Nightflight, another challenging set, in 1984, then backed off the guitarist. His 1989 disc Special Road, first came out on the Dutch Black Magic logo and was reissued by Evidence Music. Robinson passed away on November 25, 1997 at the age of 62 due to complications from brain cancer. ---Bill Dahl, allmusic.com

download (mp3 @320 kbs):

yandex mediafire uloz.to gett

 

back

]]>
administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Fenton Robinson Sat, 26 May 2018 14:55:11 +0000
Fenton Robinson & Larry Davis (1970) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/828-fentonrobinson/20685-fenton-robinson-a-larry-davis-1970.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/828-fentonrobinson/20685-fenton-robinson-a-larry-davis-1970.html Fenton Robinson & Larry Davis (1970)

Image could not be displayed. Check browser for compatibility.


A1 	–Fenton Robinson 	The Getaway 	
A2 	–Fenton Robinson 	Mississippi Steamboat 	
A3 	–Fenton Robinson 	Somebody Loan Me A Dime 	
A4 	–Fenton Robinson 	From My Heart 	
A5 	–Fenton Robinson 	Tennessee Woman 	
A6 	–Fenton Robinson 	Cryin' Out Loud 	
B1 	–Fenton Robinson 	Schoolboy 	
B2 	–Larry Davis (4) 	Texas Flood 	
B3 	–Larry Davis (4) 	I Tried 	
B4 	–Larry Davis (4) 	Angels In Houston 	
B5 	–Larry Davis (4) 	Rock Me [Baby] 	
B6 	–Larry Davis (4) 	Woke Up This Morning

Tracks recorded 1957-1966. 
Original pressing of this came in plain white sleeve.
Python Records ‎– PLP-24.

download (mp3 @320 kbs):

yandex mediafire ulozto ge.tt solidfiles bayfiles

 

 

back

]]>
administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Fenton Robinson Fri, 18 Nov 2016 13:29:42 +0000
Fenton Robinson - Complete Early Recordings (2001) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/828-fentonrobinson/13734-fenton-robinson-complete-early-recordings-2001.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/828-fentonrobinson/13734-fenton-robinson-complete-early-recordings-2001.html Fenton Robinson - Complete Early Recordings (2001)

Image could not be displayed. Check browser for compatibility.


01. Tennessee woman
02. Crying out loud
03. Crazy crazy lovin'
04. Mississippi steamboat
05. The freeze
06. Double freeze (vcl: Peppermint Harris)
07. As the years go passing by
08. Tennessee woman
09. You've got to pass this way again
09a. Schoolboy
10. You don't move me anymore
11. My woman done quit me
12. Say you're leaving
13. Directly from my heart
14. You're cracking me up
15. I put my baby in high society
16. I believe
17. Somebody loan me a dime
18. Farmer's son
19. Let me rock you to sleep
20. Keep on grooving me baby
21. 7/11 blues
22. There goes my baby

Fenton Robinson, vcl/g; 
Charles Mc Gowan, g; pno; (1-2)
Robert Williams, t-sax;  (1-2)
Larry Davis, bs; (1-6)
J.W. Hughes, dms (1-2)
James Booker, pno;  (3-9)
Texas Johnny Brown, g;  (7-9)
David Dean, t-sax;  (3-9)
Hamp Simmons, bs;  (7-9)
Nat Kendricks, dms  (3-9)
Hop Wilson, st-g;  (10-11)
Elmore Nixon, pno;  (10-11)
Pete Douglas, bs;  (10-11)
Ivory Lee Semien, dms. (10-11)
Detroit Jr, pno;  (12-15)
Burgess Gardner, t-sax;  (12-15) 
Eddie Silvers, a-sax;  (12-15)
Bob Anderson, bs;  (12-15)
Billy Davenport, dms.  (12-15)
Kenneth Sands, tpt;  (16-17)
Bobby Forte, t-sax;  (16-17)
Alberto Gianquinto, pno;  (16-17)
Leo Lauchie, bs;  (16-17)
Sonny Freeman, dms. (16-17)
Little Cameron, t-sax;  (18-20)
Wayne Bennett, g; pno;  (18-20)
James Green, bs; dms. (18-20)
John Logan, og;  (21-22)
Mighty Joe Young, g;  (21-22)
James Green, bs;  (21-22)
Bill Warren, dms. (21-22)

 

His Japanese fans reverently dubbed Fenton Robinson "the mellow blues genius" because of his ultra-smooth vocals and jazz-inflected guitar work. But beneath the obvious subtlety resides a spark of constant regeneration -- Robinson tirelessly strives to invent something fresh and vital whenever he's near a bandstand. The soft-spoken Mississippi native got his career going in Memphis, where he'd moved at age 16. First, Rosco Gordon used him on a 1956 session for Duke that produced "Keep on Doggin'." The next year, Fenton made his own debut as a leader for the Bihari Brothers' Meteor label with his first reading of "Tennessee Woman." His band, the Dukes, included mentor Charles McGowan on guitar. T-Bone Walker and B.B. King were Robinson's idols.

1957 also saw Fenton team up with bassist Larry Davis at the Flamingo Club in Little Rock. Bobby Bland caught the pair there and recommended them to his boss, Duke Records prexy Don Robey. Both men made waxings for Duke in 1958, Robinson playing on Davis' classic "Texas Flood" and making his own statement with "Mississippi Steamboat." Robinson cut the original version of the often-covered Peppermint Harris-penned slow blues "As the Years Go Passing By" for Duke in 1959 with New Orleans prodigy James Booker on piano. The same date also produced a terrific "Tennessee Woman" and a marvelous blues ballad, "You've Got to Pass This Way Again." Fenton moved to Chicago in 1962, playing Southside clubs with Junior Wells, Sonny Boy Williamson, and Otis Rush and laying down the swinging "Say You're Leavin'" for USA in 1966. But it was his stunning slow blues "Somebody (Loan Me a Dime)" cut in 1967 for Palos, that insured his blues immortality. Boz Scaggs liked it so much that he covered it for his 1969 debut LP. Unfortunately, he initially also claimed he wrote the tune.---Bill Dahl, allmusic.com

download (mp3 @320 kbs):

yandex mediafire ulozto gett solidfiles hostuje

back

]]>
administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Fenton Robinson Sun, 03 Mar 2013 17:49:10 +0000
Fenton Robinson - Blues In Progress (1988) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/828-fentonrobinson/10699-fenton-robinson-blues-in-progress-1988.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/828-fentonrobinson/10699-fenton-robinson-blues-in-progress-1988.html Fenton Robinson - Blues In Progress (1988)

Image could not be displayed. Check browser for compatibility.


1. I Found Out Yesterday
2. Schoolboy
3. Slow Walkin'						play
4. Can't Hold Out Much Longer
5. Nightflight
6. Sinner's Prayer
7. Laundry Man
8. Crazy, Crazy Lovin'
9. I Lost My True Love
10. The Feeling Is Gone				play

Personnel:
Drums – Roy Robertson (4)
Guitar – Fenton Robinson, Larry Burton
Harmonica – Junior Wells (tracks: 4)
Keyboards – Leo Davis
Producer – Dick Shurman, Fenton Robinson
Saxophone – Jimmy Martin (tracks: 1, 3, 7, 9), Leon Randall (tracks: 1, 3, 7, 9)
Trumpet – Paul Howard (2) (tracks: 1, 3, 7, 9), Sonny Covington (tracks: 1, 3, 7, 9)
Vocals – Fenton Robinson

 

His Japanese fans reverently dubbed Fenton Robinson "the mellow blues genius" because of his ultra-smooth vocals and jazz-inflected guitar work. But beneath the obvious subtlety resides a spark of constant regeneration -- Robinson tirelessly strives to invent something fresh and vital whenever he's near a bandstand. The soft-spoken Mississippi native got his career going in Memphis, where he'd moved at age 16. First, Rosco Gordon used him on a 1956 session for Duke that produced "Keep on Doggin'." The next year, Fenton made his own debut as a leader for the Bihari Brothers' Meteor label with his first reading of "Tennessee Woman." His band, the Dukes, included mentor Charles McGowan on guitar. T-Bone Walker and B.B. King were Robinson's idols.

1957 also saw Fenton team up with bassist Larry Davis at the Flamingo Club in Little Rock. Bobby Bland caught the pair there and recommended them to his boss, Duke Records prexy Don Robey. Both men made waxings for Duke in 1958, Robinson playing on Davis' classic "Texas Flood" and making his own statement with "Mississippi Steamboat." Robinson cut the original version of the often-covered Peppermint Harris-penned slow blues "As the Years Go Passing By" for Duke in 1959 with New Orleans prodigy James Booker on piano. The same date also produced a terrific "Tennessee Woman" and a marvelous blues ballad, "You've Got to Pass This Way Again." Fenton moved to Chicago in 1962, playing Southside clubs with Junior Wells, Sonny Boy Williamson, and Otis Rush and laying down the swinging "Say You're Leavin'" for USA in 1966. But it was his stunning slow blues "Somebody (Loan Me a Dime)" cut in 1967 for Palos, that insured his blues immortality. Boz Scaggs liked it so much that he covered it for his 1969 debut LP. Unfortunately, he initially also claimed he wrote the tune; much litigation followed.

John Richbourg's Sound Stage 7/Seventy 7 labels, it's safe to say, didn't really have a clue as to what Fenton Robinson's music was all about. The guitarist's 1970 Nashville waxings for the firm were mostly horrific: he wasn't even invited to play his own guitar on the majority of the horribly unsubtle rock-slanted sides. His musical mindset was growing steadily jazzier by then, not rockier.

Robinson fared a great deal better at his next substantial stop: Chicago's Alligator Records. His 1974 album Somebody Loan Me a Dime remains the absolute benchmark of his career, spotlighting his rich, satisfying vocals and free-spirited, understated guitar work in front of a rock-solid horn-driven band. By comparison, 1977's I Hear Some Blues Downstairs was a trifle disappointing despite its playful title track and a driving T-Bone tribute, "Tell Me What's the Reason." Alligator issued Nightflight, another challenging set, in 1984, then backed off the guitarist. His 1989 disc Special Road, first came out on the Dutch Black Magic logo and was reissued by Evidence Music. Robinson passed away on November 25, 1997 at the age of 62 due to complications from brain cancer. ---Bill Dahl, allmusic.com

download (mp3 @320 kbs):

yandex mediafire ulozto ge.tt

solidfiles bayfiles

 

 

back

]]>
administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Fenton Robinson Wed, 02 Nov 2011 09:53:00 +0000
Fenton Robinson - I Hear Some Blues Downstairs (1977) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/828-fentonrobinson/10629-fenton-robinson-i-hear-some-blues-downstairs-1977.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/828-fentonrobinson/10629-fenton-robinson-i-hear-some-blues-downstairs-1977.html Fenton Robinson - I Hear Some Blues Downstairs (1977)

Image could not be displayed. Check browser for compatibility.


01. I Hear Some Blues Downstairs 
02. Just A Little Bit 
03. West Side Baby 
04. I'm So Tired 
05. I Wish For You 					play
06. Tell Me What's The Reason		play 
07. Going West 
08. Killing Floor 
09. As The Years Go Passing By 

Fenton Robinson- (Vocals, Guitar); 
Steve Ditzell- (Guitar); 
Earl Crossley- (Tenor Sax); 
Billy Brimfield- (Trumpet); 
Bill McFarland- (Trombone); 
Bill Heid- (Keyboards); 
Ashward Gates, Jr. (Drums).

 

A disappointment in its inconsistency following such a mammoth triumph as his previous set, yet not without its mellow delights. The title track is untypically playful; Robinson's revisiting of the mournful "As the Years Go Passing By" is a moving journey, and his T-Bone Walker tribute "Tell Me What's the Reason" swings deftly. On the other hand, a superfluous remake of Rosco Gordon's "Just a Little Bit" goes nowhere, and nobody really needed another "Killing Floor." ---Bill Dahl, allmusic.com

 

Fenton Robinson's 'Somebody Loan Me A Dime' is a classic album, and this one is the follow up to it. An album like that is a hard act to follow but this one is still pretty decent. One weak point of it is a few of the song selections. The blues world did not need more versions of Roscoe Gordon's "Just a Little Bit" or Howlin' Wolf's "Killing Floor" and even Fenton couldn't put much life into them. Other than these song's the rest of the album is very good, particularly the title track, a nice original from Robinson, a re-cut of the classic "As the Years go Passing By", and a pair of T-Bone Walker covers, "West Side Baby" and "Tell me what's the Reason", a tribute to one of his mentor's.

This album may not be the equivalent of 'Somebody Loan Me A Dime', but it still stands on its own as a fine work by an under-recognized master of blues. There is plenty of room for his fantastic vocal's and guitar playing throughout the album. --- Sam Mosley "The Junkyard Junky" (Toronto, Ontario)

download (mp3 @320 kbs):

yandex mediafire ulozto ge.tt solidfiles bayfiles

 

back

]]>
administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Fenton Robinson Wed, 26 Oct 2011 08:39:48 +0000
Fenton Robinson – Somebody Loan Me A Dime (1974) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/828-fentonrobinson/6716-fenton-robinson-somebody-loan-me-a-dime-1974.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/828-fentonrobinson/6716-fenton-robinson-somebody-loan-me-a-dime-1974.html Fenton Robinson – Somebody Loan Me A Dime (1974)

Image could not be displayed. Check browser for compatibility.


1. "Somebody Loan Me a Dime" – 2:54
2. "The Getaway" – 4:17
3. "Directly from My Heart to You" (Little Richard) – 4:17
4. "Going to Chicago" (Traditional) – 3:46
5. "You Say You're Leaving" (Big Joe Williams) – 3:15
6. "Checking on My Woman" – 3:23
7. "You Don't Know What Love Is" – 3:50
8. "I've Changed" – 4:23
9. "Country Girl" (Rudy Toombs) – 4:55
10. "Gotta Wake Up" (Robinson) – 4:25
11. "Texas Flood" (Larry Davis, Don Robey, Joseph Wade Scott) – 4:12
* Dave Baldwin – tenor saxophone
* Cornelius Boyson – bass guitar
* Elmer Brown – trumpet
* Tony Gooden – drums
* Bill Heid – keyboards
* Norval D. Hodges – trumpet
* Bruce Iglauer – record producer
* Bill McFarland – trombone
* Fenton Robinson – guitar, vocals
* Mighty Joe Young – guitar

 

One of the most subtly satisfying electric blues albums of the '70s. Fenton Robinson never did quite fit the "Genuine Houserocking Music" image of Alligator Records -- his deep, rich baritone sounds more like a magic carpet than a piece of barbed wire, and he speaks in jazz-inflected tongues, full of complex surprises. The title track hits with amazing power, as do the chugging "The Getaway," a hard-swinging "You Say You're Leaving," and the minor-key "You Don't Know What Love Is." In every case, Robinson had recorded them before, but thanks to Bruce Iglauer's superb production, a terrific band, and Robinson's musicianship, these versions reign supreme. ---Bill Dahl, allmusic.com

download (mp3 @320 kbs):

yandex mediafire ulozto gett solidfiles bayfiles

 

back

]]>
administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Fenton Robinson Tue, 07 Sep 2010 20:53:04 +0000
Fenton Robinson – Nightflight (1984) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/828-fentonrobinson/6707-fenton-robinson-nightflight-1984.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/828-fentonrobinson/6707-fenton-robinson-nightflight-1984.html Fenton Robinson – Nightflight (1984)

Image could not be displayed. Check browser for compatibility.


1. I Found Out Yesterday
2. Slow Walking
3. Can't Hold Out Much Longer
4. Nightflight
5. Feeling Is Gone, The
6. Laundry Man
7. Crazy Crazy Lovin'
8. I Lost My True Love
9. Schoolboy
10. Sinner's Prayer

Personnel:
Fenton Robinson (guitar, vocals),
Larry Burton (guitar),
Junior Wells (harmonica),
Leo Davis (keyboards),
Aron Burton (bass),
Roy Robertson (drums).
+
Leon Randall (tenor saxophone),
Jimmy Martin (baritone saxophone),
Paul Howard, Sonny Covington (trumpets).

 

All songs written or co-written by Fenton Robinson except "Can't Hold Out Much Longer" (Jacobs), "The Feeling Is Gone" (Malone), and "Sinner's Prayer" (Fulson/Glenn). For the most part, another easy-going trip to the mellower side of contemporary blues, Robinson's jazzy tone and buttery vocals applied to a couple of his '50s-era numbers ("Crazy Crazy Lovin'" and "Schoolboy") along with some intriguing new iteams and Lowell Fulson's mournful "Sinner's Prayer." Tasty backing helps too. ~ Bill Dahl

download (mp3 @320 kbs):

yandex mediafire ulozto gett solidfiles bayfiles hostuje

 

back

]]>
administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Fenton Robinson Tue, 07 Sep 2010 09:57:57 +0000
Fenton Robinson - Monday Morning Boogie & Blues (1972) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/828-fentonrobinson/2162-monday-morning-boogie.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/828-fentonrobinson/2162-monday-morning-boogie.html Fenton Robinson - Monday Morning Boogie & Blues (1972)


A1	The Sky Is Crying	 	
A2	Smokestack Lightning	 	
A3	Little Red Rooster	 	
A4	Somebody Loan Me a Dime	 	
A5	Moanin' for My Baby	 	
B1	Little Turch	 	
B2	Don't Start Me Talking	 	
B3	Let Me Come on Back Home	 	
B4	Stormy Monday	 	
B5	Give You Some Air

Bass – Neal Dover, Tim Drummond
Drums – Karl Himmel, Robert Tarrant
Electric Guitar – Mac Gayden, Mark Tidwell, Troy Seals
Harmonica – Ed Kollis
Horn Arrangements – Bergen White
Organ – Sandy Kaye
Piano – Bob Wilson
Producer – Tim Drummond
Vocals, Electric Guitar – Fenton Robinson

 

His Japanese fans reverently dubbed Fenton Robinson "the mellow blues genius" because of his ultra-smooth vocals and jazz-inflected guitar work. But beneath the obvious subtlety resides a spark of constant regeneration -- Robinson tirelessly strives to invent something fresh and vital whenever he's near a bandstand. The soft-spoken Mississippi native got his career going in Memphis, where he'd moved at age 16. First, Rosco Gordon used him on a 1956 session for Duke that produced "Keep on Doggin'." The next year, Fenton made his own debut as a leader for the Bihari Brothers' Meteor label with his first reading of "Tennessee Woman." His band, the Dukes, included mentor Charles McGowan on guitar. T-Bone Walker and B.B. King were Robinson's idols.

1957 also saw Fenton team up with bassist Larry Davis at the Flamingo Club in Little Rock. Bobby Bland caught the pair there and recommended them to his boss, Duke Records prexy Don Robey. Both men made waxings for Duke in 1958, Robinson playing on Davis' classic "Texas Flood" and making his own statement with "Mississippi Steamboat." Robinson cut the original version of the often-covered Peppermint Harris-penned slow blues "As the Years Go Passing By" for Duke in 1959 with New Orleans prodigy James Booker on piano. The same date also produced a terrific "Tennessee Woman" and a marvelous blues ballad, "You've Got to Pass This Way Again." Fenton moved to Chicago in 1962, playing Southside clubs with Junior Wells, Sonny Boy Williamson, and Otis Rush and laying down the swinging "Say You're Leavin'" for USA in 1966. But it was his stunning slow blues "Somebody (Loan Me a Dime)" cut in 1967 for Palos, that insured his blues immortality. Boz Scaggs liked it so much that he covered it for his 1969 debut LP. Unfortunately, he initially also claimed he wrote the tune; much litigation followed.

John Richbourg's Sound Stage 7/Seventy 7 labels, it's safe to say, didn't really have a clue as to what Fenton Robinson's music was all about. The guitarist's 1970 Nashville waxings for the firm were mostly horrific: he wasn't even invited to play his own guitar on the majority of the horribly unsubtle rock-slanted sides. His musical mindset was growing steadily jazzier by then, not rockier. Robinson fared a great deal better at his next substantial stop: Chicago's Alligator Records. His 1974 album Somebody Loan Me a Dime remains the absolute benchmark of his career, spotlighting his rich, satisfying vocals and free-spirited, understated guitar work in front of a rock-solid horn-driven band. By comparison, 1977's I Hear Some Blues Downstairs was a trifle disappointing despite its playful title track and a driving T-Bone tribute, "Tell Me What's the Reason." Alligator issued Nightflight, another challenging set, in 1984, then backed off the guitarist. His 1989 disc Special Road, first came out on the Dutch Black Magic logo and was reissued by Evidence Music. Robinson passed away on November 25, 1997 at the age of 62 due to complications from brain cancer. ---Bill Dahl, allmusic.com

download (mp3 @320 kbs):

yandex mediafire ulozto ge.tt solidfiles bayfiles

 

back

]]>
administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Fenton Robinson Wed, 28 Oct 2009 11:00:12 +0000