Blues The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/797.html Fri, 04 Dec 2020 21:04:22 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Bo Diddley - The Black Gladiator (1970/2012) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/797-bodidley/21483-bo-diddley-the-black-gladiator-19702012-.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/797-bodidley/21483-bo-diddley-the-black-gladiator-19702012-.html Bo Diddley - The Black Gladiator (1970/2012)

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01. Elephant Man 4:28
02. You, Bo Diddley 3:30
03. Black Soul 2:47
04. Power House 2:50
05. If The Bible's Right 3:08
06. I've Got A Feeling 2:46
07. Shut Up, Woman 3:40
08. Hot Buttered Blues 3:44
09. Funky Fly 2:55
10. I Don't Like You 3:10

Bo Diddley - Guitar, Vocals
Bobby Alexis - Organ 
Clifton James - Drums
Chester Lindsey - Bass 
Cookie Vee - Tambourine, Vocals 

 

It was four years between the release of Bo's last album of all-new cuts, 500% More Man, and this album, during which time he'd spent time recording with Chess' top bluesmen, Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf. The death of Leonard Chess in October of 1969 resulted in the sale of the label to the GRT corporation, and cost the company what little artistic guidance it had. The result was The Black Gladiator, an attempt to reshape Bo into a funk artist, in the manner of Sly and the Family Stone. As an experiment it's understandable, and Bo tries very hard (even making another song-length sexual boast on "You, Bo Diddley," which also ends with a great guitar/organ duet between Bo and Bobby Alexis), but he finally fails to find a groove that works. Despite some good guitar here and there, this record falls into the same category as Muddy's Electric Mud and After the Rain albums, and Howlin' Wolf's New Album, all of which attempted to transform each into a psychedelic rocker. "Power House" is a pretty good cut, using a modified Muddy Waters-"I'm a Man"/"Mannish Boy" beat and lyrics. Much of the rest is for absolute completists only, however. ---Bruce Eder, AllMusic Review

 

 

Recorded and released in 1970, The Black Gladiator was Bo Diddley’s first album of all new material since 1965’s 500% More Man. In the intervening half-decade the music scene had been through some pretty radical changes, and the astute and forward-thinking Diddley wasn’t about to be left behind. “I just decided to do somethin’ different,” he told biographer George R White. “Everybody was wearin’ funny lookin’ crap—Isaac Hayes had come out with chains an’ stuff on, an’ it was kinda flowin’ in that area at that particular time—so I got me some belts an’ stuff, an’ said I was The Black Gladiator.”

The resultant album is one of the overlooked gems in the Diddley catalog, showcasing a freakier, funkier sound that was in step with the times, while retaining the raunch and swagger that defined his earlier work. Bo goes balls-out on the very first track, “Elephant Man,” whipping up a torrid, wall-shaking guitar riff over which he hollers some of his craziest rhymes yet, about how he constructed this bizarre animal, called the elephant (maybe you’ve heard of it?), piece by piece, naming its various body parts, then letting out a blood-curdling scream every time he gets around to not quite mentioning its ass. Such profundity was in short supply at the time.

The album never quite scales the elephantine heights of its monster opening number, but there’s still much to enjoy. The backing band cooks throughout—plenty of wailing organ, rattling tambourines and crisp, funky drumming—and Bo is clearly having a ball with this new, different sound. “Black Soul,” “I’ve Got a Feeling” and “Funky Fly” all boast tough, memorable grooves as well as plenty of muscular guitar work. “You, Bo Diddley” is one of Bo’s archetypal self-tributes, as is “Power House,” a virile boast built around his trusty “I’m a Man” riff, while the strange but wonderful “I Don’t Like You” is one of Bo’s trademark signifying pieces in the tradition of “Say Man,” with Bo trading insults with backing singer Cornelia Redmond (a.k.a. Cookie Vee) and also showing off his abilities as an opera singer—was there no end to this man’s talents? ---ugly-things.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Bo Diddley Thu, 20 Apr 2017 13:42:39 +0000
Bo Diddley - A Man Amongst Men (1996) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/797-bodidley/15876-bo-diddley-a-man-amongst-men-1996.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/797-bodidley/15876-bo-diddley-a-man-amongst-men-1996.html Bo Diddley - A Man Amongst Men (1996)

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01. Bo Diddley Is Crazy (4:52)
02. Can I Walk You Home (5:21)
03. Hey Baby (4:50)
04. I Can't Stand It (5:18)
05. He's Got a Key (4:00)
06. A Man Amongst Men (4:00)
07. Coatimundi (5:19)
08. That Mule (6:26)
09. Kids Don't Do It (7:02)
10. Oops! Bo Diddley (7:21)

Musicians:
    Bo Diddley - vocals, guitar
    Jerry Portnoy - harmonica
    Richie Sambora -guitar
    Dave Bronze - bass
    Mike Vernon - bass drum, maracas, tambourine, claves, pans, woodblock
    John Rosenberg
    Nunzio Signore
    Margo Lewis - Hammond B-3 organ
    Tom Major
    Dave Keyes - piano, Hammond B-3 organ, synthesizer
    Debby Hastings
    Reese "Philosopher G" Mitchell - vocals
    Wayne Q. Sheehy – drums

 

Bo Diddley's major-label '90s comeback effort A Man Amongst Men is overflowing with guest stars, but it rarely gels into something distinctive. The presence of such heavyweights as Keith Richards, Ron Wood, and Jimmie Vaughan actually weighs down the set, preventing Diddley from digging deep into the grooves. The band never quite rocks hard enough and no one tears off an inspired solo -- A Man Amongst Men is pleasant, but it never approaches compelling listening. --- Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Rovi

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Bo Diddley Wed, 16 Apr 2014 16:04:18 +0000
Bo Diddley - The Blues Collection Vol.5 – Jungle Music (1993) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/797-bodidley/12081-bo-diddley-the-blues-collection-vol5-jungle-music.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/797-bodidley/12081-bo-diddley-the-blues-collection-vol5-jungle-music.html Bo Diddley - The Blues Collection Vol.5 – Jungle Music (1993)

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1. Jungle Music (The Blues Collection Vol.5 - 01 - The Story Of Bo Diddley
2. Jungle Music (The Blues Collection Vol.5 - 02 - Down Home Special
3. Jungle Music (The Blues Collection Vol.5 - 03 - Little Girl		play
4. Jungle Music (The Blues Collection Vol.5 - 04 - Bo Diddley		play
5. Jungle Music (The Blues Collection Vol.5 - 05 - You Don't Love Me
6. Jungle Music (The Blues Collection Vol.5 - 06 - Diddy Wah Diddy
7. Jungle Music (The Blues Collection Vol.5 - 07 - Pretty Thing
8. Jungle Music (The Blues Collection Vol.5 - 08 - Bring It To Jerome
9. Jungle Music (The Blues Collection Vol.5 - 09 - Dancing Girl
10. Jungle Music (The Blues Collection Vol.5 - 10 - Who Do You Love
11. Jungle Music (The Blues Collection Vol.5 - 11 - Crackin' Up
12. Jungle Music (The Blues Collection Vol.5 - 12 - I Am Looking For A Woman
13. Jungle Music (The Blues Collection Vol.5 - 13 - Cops & Robbers
14. Jungle Music (The Blues Collection Vol.5 - 14 - Nursery Rhyme
15. Jungle Music (The Blues Collection Vol.5 - 15 - Hey! Bo Diddley
16. Jungle Music (The Blues Collection Vol.5 - 16 - You Can't Judge A Book By The Cover
17. Jungle Music (The Blues Collection Vol.5 - 17 - Before You Accuse Me
18. Jungle Music (The Blues Collection Vol.5 - 18 - Say Man

Backing Vocals – The Moonglows (tracks: 6, 14, 15)
Bass – Chester Lindsay (tracks: 16), James Bradford (tracks: 3 to 5),
 Jesse James Johnson (tracks: 16), Willie Dixon (tracks: 1, 2, 6 to 11, 13 to 15, 17, 18)
Drums – Billy Downing (tracks: 16), Clifton James (tracks: 3 to 7 to 11, 13 to 15, 17, 18),
 Edell Robertson (tracks: 16), Frank Kirkland (tracks: 1, 2, 6, 9, 11 to 15, 17, 18)
Guitar – Jody Williams (tracks: 6, 9, 10, 12)
Guitar, Vocals – Bo Diddley
Harmonica – Billy Boy Arnold (tracks: 3, 5), Lester Davenport (tracks: 7, 8), Little Willie Smith (tracks: 9, 10, 12)
Maracas – Jerome Green (tracks: 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 to 11, 16, 18)
Piano – Lafayette Leake (tracks: 1, 11, 18), Otis Spann (tracks: 3, 5, 13) 

 

Bo Diddley (December 30, 1928 – June 2, 2008), born Ellas Otha Bates, was an original and influential American rock ‘n roll singer, guitarist, and songwriter. He was known as “The Originator” because of his key role in the transition from blues music to rock ‘n roll, influencing a host of legendary acts including Buddy Holly, Jimi Hendrix and Eric Clapton.

He introduced more insistent, driving rhythms and hard-edged guitar sounds on a wide-ranging catalog of songs. Accordingly, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and received Lifetime Achievement Awards from the Rhythm and Blues Foundation and NARAS (National Academy of Recording Artists and Sciences, the Grammy® organization). Bo was also known for his technical innovations, including his trademark rectangular guitar.

Learn more about Bo Diddley, his unique sound, and his influence on popular music and culture at www.bodiddley.com. ---amazon.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Bo Diddley Sat, 21 Apr 2012 16:02:04 +0000
Bo Diddley & Muddy Waters & Little Walter – Super Blues (1968) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/797-bodidley/2110-didleyqwalterwaters68.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/797-bodidley/2110-didleyqwalterwaters68.html Bo Diddley & Muddy Waters & Little Walter – Super Blues (1968)


1. Long Distance Call [Morganfield]
2. Who Do You Love? [McDaniel]
3. I'm a Man [Diddley]
4. Bo Diddley [McDaniel]
5. You Can't Judge a Book by Its Cover [Dixon]
6. I Just Want to Make Love to You [Dixon]
7. My Babe [Dixon]
8. You Don't Love Me (You Don't Care) [McDaniel]
9. Studio Chatter [McDaniel]
10. Sad Hours [Little Walter]
11. Juke [Little Walter]
Bo Diddley – vocals, guitar Muddy Waters – vocals, guitar Little Walter – vocals, harmonica Sonny Wimberley – bass guitar Frank Kirkland – drums Buddy Guy – guitar Otis Spann – piano Cookie Vee – tambourine, vocals

 

In early 1967, Chess Records decided to shore up its fortunes by placing three of its aging stars in the studio to record together. Muddy Waters, Bo Diddley, and Little Walter played off each other on the session that would result in the Super Blues album which, in turn, would sell enough copies to keep the ball rolling and merit a second all-star session.

Later that year, Waters and Diddley were joined in the studio by the great Howlin' Wolf, who replaced the ailing Little Walter, for a similar blues jam session. With a top-notch band that included guitarists Hubert Sumlin and Buddy Guy (who also played bass), pianist Otis Spann, and drummer Clifton James, the trio of Chess legends laid down the songs that would become The Super Super Blues Band album. --- Reverend Keith A. Gordon, bluesabout.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Bo Diddley Tue, 27 Oct 2009 17:32:48 +0000
Bo Diddley – Say Man (1992) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/797-bodidley/2108-bodidleysayman.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/797-bodidley/2108-bodidleysayman.html Bo Diddley – Say Man (1992)


01.	Bo Diddley
02.	Dearest Darling
03.	Diddley Daddy
04.	Mona
05.	I’m a Man
06.	Pretty Thing
07.	Road Runner
08.	Hey Bo Diddley
09.	Crackin’ Up
10.	Bring It To Jerome
11.	Say Man
12.	Who Do You Love
13.	Hush Your Mouth
14.	I Can Tell
15.	You Can’t Judge A Book By Looking At The Cover
16.	Pretty Girl
17.	Cops and Robbers

 

Ellas Otha Bates (December 30, 1928 – June 2, 2008), known by his stage name Bo Diddley, was an American rhythm and blues vocalist, guitarist, songwriter (usually as Ellas McDaniel), and rock and roll pioneer. He was also known as "The Originator" because of his key role in the transition from the blues to rock, influencing a host of acts, including Buddy Holly, Jimi Hendrix, The Rolling Stones, The Velvet Underground, The Who, The Yardbirds, Eric Clapton, Elvis Presley, The Beatles, and George Michael, among others. He introduced more insistent, driving rhythms and a hard-edged electric guitar sound on a wide-ranging catalog of songs, along with African rhythms and a signature beat (a simple, five-accent rhythm) that remains a cornerstone of rock and pop. Accordingly, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and received Lifetime Achievement Awards from the Rhythm and Blues Foundation and a Grammy Award from the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. He was known in particular for his technical innovations, including his trademark rectangular guitar.

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Bo Diddley Tue, 27 Oct 2009 17:30:02 +0000
Bo Diddley – Bo Diddley In The Spotlight (1960) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/797-bodidley/2107-bodidleysotlight60.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/797-bodidley/2107-bodidleysotlight60.html Bo Diddley – Bo Diddley In The Spotlight (1960)


A1 Road Runner 2:44
A2 Story of Bo Diddley 2:47
A3 Scuttle Bug 2:23
A4 Signifying Blues 2:38
A5 Let Me In 1:56 
A6 Limber 2:32
B1 Love Me 2:25 
B2 Craw-Dad 2:31
B3 Walkin' and Talkin' 2:43
B4 Travelin' West 1:47
B5 Deed and Deed I Do 2:20
B6 Live My Life 2:37

Bo Diddley (vocals, guitar), 
Otis Spann (piano); 
Willie Dixon (bass); 
Clifton James (drums), 
Jerome Green (maracas).

 

As with Bo Diddley's first five albums (except Have Guitar, Will Travel), the most important cuts (but not all the good ones) off of this album have been included on The Chess Box from MCA, which doesn't mean that this record isn't a good separate issue, just somewhat redundant if you have the box. There are surprises from these 1960-vintage recordings, including the languid, Caribbean-sounding "Limber"; the soft, romantic "Love Me"; the doo wop-style "Deed and Deed I Do"; the loping "Walkin' and Talkin'"; upbeat, gospel-tinged rockers such as "Let Me In" interspersed with the hot and raunchy "Road Runner," "The Story of Bo Diddley," "Craw-Dad" (a genuine diamond in the rough), and "Signifying Blues"; and solid instrumentals like "Scuttle Bug" (really "Live My Life" with the vocals removed and Otis Spann overdubbed on piano) that make this record more than worthwhile. ---Bruce Eder, allmusic.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Bo Diddley Tue, 27 Oct 2009 17:25:49 +0000