Blues The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/2591.html Sun, 12 Jul 2020 02:50:51 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Taste - London Invasion (1969) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/2591-taste/25045-taste-london-invasion-1969.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/2591-taste/25045-taste-london-invasion-1969.html Taste - London Invasion (1969)

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Top Gear, BBC (August 5, 1968)
01 Same Old Story
02 Blister On The Moon
03 Dual Carriageway Pain
04 Norman Invasion

Top Gear, BBC (February 17, 1969)
05 Moving On
06 Sugar Mama
07 Leaving Blues
08 Hail

Marquee Club, London (October 25, 1968)
09 I'm Moving On
10 Baby Please Don't Go / Bye Bye Bird
11 Blister On The Moon
12 Sugar Mama
13 First Time I Met The Blues
14 Catfish

Bass – Eric Kittrington (tracks: 1 to 4), Richard McCracken (tracks: 5 to 14)
Drums – John Wilson (tracks: 5 to 14), Norman Damery (tracks: 1 to 4)
Guitar, Harp, Vocals – Rory Gallagher

 

Before becoming a solo star, Rory Gallagher fronted the blues-rock trio Taste, which experienced reasonable success in the U.K. in the late '60s and early '70s. Taste was molded very much on the model of Cream, adding some folk, pop, and jazz elements to a blues-rock base, and featuring a virtuosic guitarist. They weren't in the same league as Cream, particularly in the songwriting department, and were (like Cream) prone to occasional blues-rock bombast. But they weren't a bad band in their own right, exhibiting a lighter touch than most British blues boom outfits.

The focus of Taste was always upon Gallagher. In addition to playing accomplished and versatile lead guitar, he sang in a gentle but convincing fashion, and wrote the band's original material. Much of Taste's repertoire was more restrained and balanced than the territory Gallagher would explore on his '70s outings, which placed more emphasis upon him as guitar hero. Gallagher also played occasional saxophone and harmonica with the group.

Gallagher formed the first version of Taste in his native Ireland in 1966, with bassist Eric Kittringham and drummer Norman Damery. In May of 1968, he relocated to London and, still months shy of his 20th birthday, formed a new version of Taste with bassist Charlie McCracken (who had played bass with Spencer Davis, though not at the peak of Davis' hit-making days) and drummer John Wilson (who had been a drummer with Them, likewise not during one of their well-known incarnations). Two studio albums followed in 1969 and 1970, the second of which made the British Top 20. Taste was still virtually unknown in the States when they broke up shortly afterwards, although a couple of live albums were released in the early '70s to keep some product on the shelves. ---Richie Unterberger, allmusic.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Taste Sat, 30 Mar 2019 16:18:24 +0000
Taste - Taste First (1967) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/2591-taste/19513-taste-taste-first-1967.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/2591-taste/19513-taste-taste-first-1967.html Taste - Taste First (1967)

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01 - Wee Wee Baby 
02 - How Many More Years 
03 - Take It Easy Baby 
04 - You've Got To Pay 
05 - Worried Man 
06 - Norman Invasion 
07 - Pardon Me Mister

Rory Gallagher – vocals, guitar
Richard McCracken – bass
John Wilson – drums

 

Before becoming a solo star, Rory Gallagher fronted the blues-rock trio Taste, which experienced reasonable success in the U.K. in the late '60s and early '70s. Taste was molded very much on the model of Cream, adding some folk, pop, and jazz elements to a blues-rock base, and featuring a virtuosic guitarist. They weren't in the same league as Cream, particularly in the songwriting department, and were (like Cream) prone to occasional blues-rock bombast. But they weren't a bad band in their own right, exhibiting a lighter touch than most British blues boom outfits.

The focus of Taste was always upon Gallagher. In addition to playing accomplished and versatile lead guitar, he sang in a gentle but convincing fashion, and wrote the band's original material. Much of Taste's repertoire was more restrained and balanced than the territory Gallagher would explore on his '70s outings, which placed more emphasis upon him as guitar hero. Gallagher also played occasional saxophone and harmonica with the group.

Gallagher formed the first version of Taste in his native Ireland in 1966, with bassist Eric Kittringham and drummer Norman Damery. In May of 1968, he relocated to London and, still months shy of his 20th birthday, formed a new version of Taste with bassist Charlie McCracken (who had played bass with Spencer Davis, though not at the peak of Davis' hit-making days) and drummer John Wilson (who had been a drummer with Them, likewise not during one of their well-known incarnations). Two studio albums followed in 1969 and 1970, the second of which made the British Top 20. Taste was still virtually unknown in the States when they broke up shortly afterwards, although a couple of live albums were released in the early '70s to keep some product on the shelves. ---Richie Unterberger, Rovi

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Taste Wed, 06 Apr 2016 16:00:36 +0000
Taste - Taste (1969) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/2591-taste/15501-taste-taste-1969.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/2591-taste/15501-taste-taste-1969.html Taste - Taste (1969)

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1.    "Blister on the Moon" - 3:26
2.    "Leavin' Blues" (Huddie Ledbetter) - 4:15
3.    "Sugar Mama" (Chester Burnett)- 7:14
4.    "Hail" - 2:35
5.    "Born on the Wrong Side of Time" - 4:00
6.    "Dual Carriageway Pain" - 3:13
7.    "Same Old Story" - 3:32
8.    "Catfish" (trad. arr. Gallagher) - 8:04
9.    "I'm Moving On" (Hank Snow) - 2:29

    Rory Gallagher - guitars, vocals, saxophone, harmonica
    Richard "Charlie" McCracken - bass guitar
    John Wilson – drums

 

The fact that they, like so many late-'60s contemporaries, were molded in the image of Cream has often been cited to diminish the stature of Irish power trio Taste. But, all things being equal, it's impossible to dismiss their fine eponymous debut based solely on obvious source of inspiration, nor, by any means, the singular talents of the band's creative and performing focal point, vocalist and guitarist Rory Gallagher -- barely 20 years of age upon its release in 1969. After opening with the menacing staccatos and power chords of the forward-looking, proto-metal classic "Blister on the Moon," Taste turn right back around and indulge their retro-fueled Brit-blues influences with a bottleneck run through Leadbelly's "Leavin' Blues" -- a show of contrasts that speaks volumes to the breadth of Gallagher's instrumental versatility. The blues keep coming with the guitarist's self-penned showcase "Sugar Mama" and a more restrained acoustic "Hail," then the hard rock fires are stoked once again with "Born on the Wrong Side of Town" -- a track whose regional folk music accents did much to foment Gallagher's enduring status as a blue-collar, Emerald Isle legend. And so it goes until the album's conclusion: with alternating glimpses of past and future musical tendencies peppering remaining tracks "Same Old Story," "Dual Carriageway Pain" (both gritty blues-rockers showing riffs that sometimes smacked of the then brand-new Led Zeppelin), "Catfish" (a traditional blues standard turned monster jam), and "I'm Moving On" (a spare but spunk-filled Hank Snow cover). Ultimately, it's a stylistic stew that would arguably get honed to better focus and achieve greater distinction from the competition on Taste's second album, a year later. But who's to say that Taste didn't have almost as much influence as Cream on future bands such as Rush, whose early records are quite literally mapped out on this release -- a worthy addition to collections of this exciting period in British rock. ---Eduardo Rivadavia, Rovi

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Taste Mon, 03 Feb 2014 16:58:06 +0000
Taste - The Best Of (1994) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/2591-taste/9415-taste-the-best-of-1994-.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/2591-taste/9415-taste-the-best-of-1994-.html Taste - The Best Of (1994)

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1 Blister On the Moon /Gallagher 3:25
2 Born On the Wrong Side of Time /Gallagher, Traditional 3:55
3 Leavin' Blues /Leadbelly, Ledbetter, Lomax 4:10		play
4 Hail /Gallagher 2:37
5 Same Old Story /Gallagher 3:29
6 Catfish /Dylan, Traditional 7:59
7 I'm Moving On Snow 2:24
8 What's Going On /Cleveland, Gallagher 2:47
9 Railway and Gun /Gallagher 3:37				play
10 Eat My Words /Gallagher 3:45
11 On the Boards /Gallagher 6:02
12 It's Happened Before, It'll Happen Again /Gallagher 6:33
13 If the Day Was Any Longer /Gallagher 2:09
14 I Feel So Good, Pt. 1 & 2 [Live At the Montreux Casino] /Broonzy 7:36
15 Sugar Mama [Live At the Montreux Casino] /Traditional 8:09
16 Sinner Boy [the Isle of Wight Live Version] /Gallagher 5:29

Musicians:
Rory Gallagher /Arranger, Guitar, Harmonica, Sax (Alto), Vocals
Richard McCracken /Guitar (Bass)
John Wilson /Drums

 

If there was a band that defined what 70's rock was all about, it was Taste. They've often been called Ireland's answer to Britain's superstar band Cream. I think they were better than Cream in every way. With Rory Gallagher on guitar, John Wilson, formerly of Them on drums, and ex Spencer Davis bassist Charlie Mccracken, they were considered the hottest live act in Europe at the time. The big reason for this was Gallagher's improvisational abilities with the six string. There was nothing fancy about this band. They didn't wear matching suits or the psychedelic clothes that were the popular attire of the day. They were just a hard workin' blue collar band with Gallagher wearing his trademark red flannel shirt on stage with his lunch pail called a '61 Fender Stratocaster. Gallagher was different than the superstar guitar players of the time like Clapton, Page, and Peter Green, who got a lot of their influences from the Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf school of Chicago blues. Gallagher loved the southern rural/ country blues of Son House and Big Joe Williams. It shows here on the feelgood acoustic song "I'm Movin' On" and the equally wonderful "Hail" where he sings note for note with his guitar. The trademark sound of Taste though was blues rock. Gallagher has to be the most aggressive guitar player that I've ever heard in the blues rock genre. Good examples of this are the opener "Blister On The Moon" and "Born On The Wrong Side Of Town". But he can also get very creative, as on the catchy "Railway and Gun". A killer tune with it's numerous rhythm changes. He also shows his creative side on the jazzy "It Happened Before, It'll Happen Again", which is Taste's most experimental song. It really swings, and it's probably Gallagher's finest moment on the six string. The only knock I have here is the same as one of the other reviewers pointed out. He shouldn't have picked up an Alto Sax he was just learning to play and attempted a solo. But hey, it was the 70's. They did those things. Sometimes they worked, sometimes not. But that's the only knock that I have on this excellent Best Of collection. If you want to hear why Rory Gallagher was considered by many to be one of the alltime best guitar players, just check this album out. It should be on all lovers of classic rock wish lists. ---Patrick Earley

 

The Best of Taste compiles material from their 4 official albums released from 1969-72. The albums consisted of two studio albums "Taste", "On The Boards, and the two live albums "Live Taste", and "Live At The Isle Of Wight". This band was a power trio led by Rory Gallagher before he disbanded the group to embark on a successful solo career. The band led by Gallagher on vocals, guitar (electric, acoustic, & slide), harmonica, and alto sax specialized in hard hitting blues rock. The music has much in common with Cream. However, the Richard McCracken and John Wilson could not compete with the stellar musicianship of Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker. The undervalued Gallagher is an unsung guitar hero whose work compares favorably with that of Eric Clapton. Like Cream the band favored extended versions of tunes like "Sugar Mama" and "I Feel Good" included here. The music included here is varied. It ranges from the slow gut wrenching version of "Catfish" to the more acoustic cover of "Leavin' Blues". The cuts from "On The Boards" become more jazzy at times. Tracks like "On The Boards" and "It's Happenened Before, It'll Happen Again" highlight the band's more improvisational approach. Hard hitting tracks like "Eat My Words" spotlight Gallagher's outstanding slide technique. Two cuts I miss from this period which are not included here are "Dual Carriageway Pain" from "Taste, and "Morning Sun" from "On The Boards". The live concert favorite "Sinner Boy" provides a bridge to Gallagher's solo career as the studio version was included on his first solo album "Rory Gallagher". This anthology provides a great overview of the early work of Irish blues-rock guitar hero Rory Gallagher and his battered Stratocaster. It is even more essential as the four original albums are only available as imports. ---J.E. Fell

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Taste Mon, 13 Jun 2011 22:17:21 +0000