Blues The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues.html Mon, 27 May 2019 10:48:29 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Muddy Waters - After The Rain (1969) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/882-muddywaters/25331-muddy-waters-after-the-rain-1969.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/882-muddywaters/25331-muddy-waters-after-the-rain-1969.html Muddy Waters - After The Rain (1969)

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1 	I Am The Blues 	
2 	Ramblin’ Mind 	
3 	Rollin’ And Tumblin’ 	
4 	Bottom Of The Sea 	
5 	Honey Bee 	
6 	Blues And Trouble 	
7 	Hurtin’ Soul 	
8 	Screamin’ And Cryin’

Bass – Louis Satterfield
Drums – Morris Jennings
Guitar – Pete Cosey, Phil Upchurch
Harmonica – Paul Oscher
Organ – Charles Stepney
Piano – Otis Spann 

 

After the Rain dates from the most controversial period in Muddy Waters' history -- along with its predecessors, Electric Mud (probably the most critically despised album in Muddy's catalog) and Brass and the Blues (an effort to turn him into B.B. King), it came out of an era in which Chess Records was desperately thrashing around trying any musical gambit to boost the sales of its top blues stars. But unlike Electric Mud, in which the repertoire selected by producer Marshall Chess was mostly unsuited, and the musical settings provided by Phil Upchurch, Pete Cosey et al. were too loud and too frenetic for Muddy's style of singing, After the Rain simply let him be Muddy Waters. The album mostly featured higher-wattage remakes of a lot of familiar repertoire, including "Honey Bee" and "Rollin' and Tumblin'," and also reintroduced Muddy's own electric guitar, which had mostly been unheard on his recordings of the 1960s (and completely missing from Electric Mud). And on the tracks where he does play lead, they're first-rate representations of his talent as it stood at the tail end of the 1960s, powerful and bold, like a king (or maybe even a god) surveying a blues landscape he had shaped, and ranging across it freely. Even the tracks on which the heavily modernistic touches appear (such as Cosey's bowed guitar on "Bottom of the Sea") don't harm the flow or tone of the overall album. The latter is as close to an experimental track as After the Rain gets, and Muddy gets into the spirit of the piece as a singer far better here than he did on most of the preceding album. But mostly he is just himself here, not overly bold -- which may be the record's major flaw, but an understandable one after the reception accorded Electric Mud -- and not too much different from the previous decade. And it's immensely pleasing on that basis alone, even if the sales figures didn't reflect this -- it would take time for Muddy to rebuild his old audience, and he and Chess Records would go on to try other settings, working with young white blues enthusiasts (Fathers and Sons) and U.K. rock admirers (The London Muddy Waters Sessions) with varying results, some of them (The Woodstock Album) award-winning. But After the Rain, though ignored at the time, was a worthy and thoroughly worthwhile addition to his discography, and not just as a curio -- moments like "Honey Bee," "Blues and Trouble," "Screamin' and Cryin'," and "Hurtin' Soul" show what he could do with these younger players in tow (as opposed to the other way around on Electric Mud), and all of it will bring a smile to any real fan. ---Bruce Eder, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Muddy Waters Sun, 26 May 2019 08:31:22 +0000
Elizabeth Cotten ‎– Live! (1983) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/1935-elizabeth-cotten/25326-elizabeth-cotten--live-1983.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/1935-elizabeth-cotten/25326-elizabeth-cotten--live-1983.html Elizabeth Cotten ‎– Live! (1983)

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A1 	Freight Train 	4:51
A2 	Washington Blues 	4:58
A3 	Jumpin' Jack 	3:40
A4 	Sugaree 	4:26
A5 	Sugaree / Banjo Story, Rattler 	5:37
B1 	Vastopol 	4:28
B2 	Guitar Story 	4:15
B3 	Babe, It Ain't No Lie 	5:50
B4 	Elizabeth Story, Et Al., Honey Babe, Your Papa Cares For You 	8:07
B5 	Spanish Flangdang 	2:35
B6 	'Til We Meet Again 	1:20

 

I'm not lying when I said that I weeped when I heard "Freight Train" the first time. Every song on this CD moved me as well as her lovely storytelling. This incredible woman was 85 when it was recorded and she sounds so hip and cool. Her guitar playing was very impressive and very ahead of its time. As a musician myself, I have learned a great deal about "Cotten Picking" and melodies. This album is a must have for Elizabeth fans and for people who have an interest in true blue acoustic music :) ---Rose Natalie Grullon, amazon.com

 

Elizabeth Cotten, born January 5, 1895 in Chapel Hill, S.C., died June 29, 1987 in Syracuse, N.Y., was a self taught blues and folk musician, singer and songwriter. She developed her own style of playing left-handed by holding a normally tuned guitar upside down so she played the melodies with her thumb and the bass lines with her fingers. Her style of playing became known as "Cotten picking".

Cotten wrote most of her music in her early teens and earlier (she wrote "Freight Train" at age 11). After marrying at 15 and getting work as a maid she stopped playing music for 40 years. It wasn't until she was working as a maid for Charles Seeger, an avid music lover, that she relearned how to play the guitar.

In the 1950s Mike Seeger began to record Cotten on reel to reel tape. In 1960 she began to play live for the first time, her first show was with Mike Seeger and she went on to perform with musicians such as Mississippi John Hurt, John Lee Hooker, and Muddy Waters. Because of the positive reaction Cotten began to write, record and tour with new material which she continued to do into her 80s. In 1984 she won the Grammy "Best Ethnic or Traditional Recording" for the album Elizabeth Cotten - Live!.

Elizabeth died when she was 92 in Syracuse, New York. ---discogs.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Elizabeth Cotten Sat, 25 May 2019 14:27:19 +0000
Clarence Gatemouth Brown ‎– Live From Austin TX 1996 (2008) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/811-clarencegatemouthbrown/25321-clarence-gatemouth-brown--live-from-austin-tx-1996-2008.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/811-clarencegatemouthbrown/25321-clarence-gatemouth-brown--live-from-austin-tx-1996-2008.html Clarence Gatemouth Brown ‎– Live From Austin TX 1996 (2008)

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1 	Ain`t That Dandy 	
2 	Born In Louisiana 	
3 	Honky-Tonk 	
4 	Dark End Of The Hallway 	
5 	Bits And Pieces 	
6 	Leftover Blues 	
7 	There You Are 	
8 	Early In The Mornin` 	
9 	Things Ain`t What They Used To Be 	
10 	Up Jumped The Devil

Austin City Limits
Austin, TX, 1996.02.06.

Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone – Eric Demmer
Baritone Saxophone – Bill "Foots" Samuel
Bass – Harold Floyd
Drums – David Peters
Keyboards, Organ – Joe Krown
Tenor Saxophone – Dennis Taylor
Trombone – Chris Belleau
Trumpet – Terry Townson
Vocals, Guitar, Fiddle, Viola – Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown

 

Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown was a versatile and crowd-pleasing entertainer throughout his long career, but it's easy to overlook just how explosive a guitarist he was, and his style mixed an elegant, jazzy tone with a rough rustic edge, and the same could be said of his fiddle playing, or Brown on any of the other instruments he played, from mandolin to harmonica to piano. Brown pretty much invented his own bayou-tinged and jazzy Texas swing style, and if it centered on the blues, it didn't always. Brown was a maverick musician, with a raconteur's attitude and talent to burn, whether he was playing blues, jazz, honky tonk, Cajun, R&B, funk, or one his own wild fiddle breakdowns, and he kept at it all the way through to his death in 2005 at the age of 81. There was no one quite like him. This CD/DVD set presents a live show Brown did for the Austin City Limits TV series in 1996, the last of his four appearances on the show, and it makes for both a fine farewell and a well-recorded introduction to this one-of-a-kind musician. Brown commands the stage with personality and vigor, bringing a funky sway to "Born in Louisiana," big-band jazz to "Bits and Pieces," and gloriously ragged fiddle to "Up Jumped the Devil," with his signature guitar leads scattered all through. Granted, this is Brown reined in just a bit because of the various restraints of television, but it still documents an American treasure doing what he always did, delivering a show like no one else's, a literal tour of American music by a wonderfully unique musician. ---Steve Leggett, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Clarence Gatemouth Brown Fri, 24 May 2019 14:41:13 +0000
Janis Joplin Rarities (1998) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/844-janisjoplin/25316-janis-joplin-rarities-1998.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/844-janisjoplin/25316-janis-joplin-rarities-1998.html Janis Joplin Rarities (1998)

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CD1
1. 	Ball & Chain 	10:50 	
2. 	Codine 	4:22 	
3. 	Janis Last Cavett Interview 	8:59 	
4. 	Bye Bye Baby 	2:41 	
5. 	Misery'n 	4:08 	
6. 	So Sad To Be Alone 	5:01 	
7. 	Catch Me Daddy 	4:54 	
8. 	Hesitation Blues 	4:10 	
9. 	Flower In The Sun 	3:04 	
10. 	Typewriter Talk

CD2
1. 	Daddy, Daddy, Daddy 	4:00 	
2. 	Nobody Knows You When You're Down And Out 	4:35 	
3. 	Trouble In Mind 	3:18 	
4. 	Farewell Song 	4:23 	
5. 	Kansas City Blues 	3:12 	
6. 	Long Black Train Blues 	2:32 	
7. 	Easy Once You Know How 	3:53 	
8. 	Roadblock 	5:31 	
9. 	Summertime 	4:06 	

 

The blues-influenced rocker had one of the most powerful voices of the Sixties. Her voice is equal parts tough and vulnerable, a shout into the void that resonated with a generation.

Janis Joplin brought her powerful, bluesy voice from Texas to San Francisco’s psychedelic scene, where she went from drifter to superstar.

She has been called “the greatest white urban blues and soul singer of her generation.” Joplin’s vocal intensity proved a perfect match for the high-energy music of Big Brother and the Holding Company, resulting in a mix of blues, folk and psychedelic rock. Joplin’s tenure with Big Brother may have been brief, lasting only from 1966 to 1968, but it yielded a pair of albums that included the milestone Cheap Thrills (1968). Moreover, her performance with Big Brother at 1967’s Monterey International Pop Festival, a highlight of the film documentary Monterey Pop (1968), is among the great performances in rock history.

In the words of biographer Myra Friedman, “It wasn’t only her voice that thrilled, with its amazing range and strength and awesome wails. To see her was to be sucked into a maelstrom of feeling that words can barely suggest.” She was a dynamic singer who shred her vocal cords on driving psychedelic rockers like “Combination of the Two” and then delivered a delicate, empathetic reading of George Gershwin’s “Summertime.”

Joplin was born in 1943 in Port Arthur, Texas, an oil-refining town on the coast. Growing up, she was a social outcast who found an outlet in music. Joplin was drawn to blues (Odetta, Leadbelly and Bessie Smith) and soul (Otis Redding, Tina Turner and Etta James). She performed folk blues on the coffeehouse circuit in Texas and San Francisco before hooking up with Big Brother—guitarists James Gurley and Sam Andrew, bassist Peter Albin and drummer David Getz—at the suggestion of Chet Helms, a hip entrepreneur and fellow Texan. The chemistry came as a revelation even to Joplin. “All of a sudden, someone threw me in front of this rock and roll band,” she said. “And I decided then and there that was it. I never wanted to do anything else.”

Big Brother were loud, explosive and somewhat deliberately crude in their mélange of blues and psychedelia. Helms, one of a group of event organizers who called themselves the Family Dog, booked the group on some of the earliest bills on the nascent San Francisco scene. Big Brother became regulars at Helm’s Avalon Ballroom in the mid-to-late Sixties. It was at the Avalon where much of Cheap Thrills—an album that topped the album charts for eight weeks in 1968—was recorded. That explosive showcase of psychedelic soul featured Joplin’s raw, impassioned readings of Willie Mae Thornton’s “Ball and Chain” and “Piece of My Heart.” The latter song, which had been a Top Ten R&B hit in 1967 for Erma Franklin (Aretha’s younger sister), was co-written by Jerry Ragavoy, a favorite songwriter of Joplin’s. As a solo artist, she would record other songs of his, including “Cry Baby,” “Get It While You Can” and “Try (Just a Little Bit Harder).”

Joplin left Big Brother in December 1968, taking guitarist Sam Andrew with her. Her first solo album, I’ve Got Dem Ol’ Kozmic Blues Again Mama!, appeared in 1969, and she toured extensively with her Kozmic Blues Band. By mid-1970, however, she dissolved that outfit and formed a superb new one, Full-Tilt Boogie. They gelled over the course of several months of touring and entered the studio to record what would turn out to be Joplin’s swan song. Joplin had often sought refuge in drugs and alcohol, and she was found dead of a heroin overdose in a Hollywood hotel room on October 4, 1970. The posthumously released Pearl (1971)—the title was her nickname—comprised nine finished tracks and one instrumental to which she was supposed to have added vocals on the day she died. It was prophetically titled “Buried Alive in the Blues.”

Pearl became Joplin’s biggest seller, holding down the Number One spot for nine weeks in 1971. It included “Me and Bobby McGee,” a song written for her by ex-lover Kris Kristofferson. A quixotic portrait of a countercultural love affair, sung by Joplin as an affectionate, road-weary country blues, “Me and Bobby McGee” perfectly captured the bohemian spirit of the times. The powerful performances on Pearl, including “Move Over,” “Half Moon” and “Get It While You Can,” hint at what might have come from Joplin had she not died at 27.

Janis Joplin has passed into the realm of legend: an outwardly brash yet inwardly vulnerable and troubled personality who possessed one of the most passionate voices in rock history. It could be argued that her legacy has as much to do with her persona as her singing. Music journalist Ellen Wills asserted that “Joplin belonged to that select group of pop figures who mattered as much for themselves as for their music. Among American rock performers, she was second only to Bob Dylan in importance as a creator-recorder-embodiment of her generation’s mythology.”

Rock critic Lillian Roxon summed up her influence with these words: “[Janis Joplin] perfectly expressed the feelings and yearnings of the girls of the electric generation—to be all woman, yet equal with men; to be free, yet a slave to real love; to [reject] every outdated convention, and yet get back to the basics of life.” ---rockhall.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Janis Joplin Thu, 23 May 2019 13:00:14 +0000
Fleeting Moment - Rock Blues and Country Digest (2017) CD09 http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/6575-fleeting-moment-rock-blues-and-country-digest/25311-fleeting-moment-rock-blues-and-country-digest-2017-cd09.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/6575-fleeting-moment-rock-blues-and-country-digest/25311-fleeting-moment-rock-blues-and-country-digest-2017-cd09.html Fleeting Moment - Rock Blues and Country Digest (2017) CD09

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081. Willa — Better Days
082. Karen Lovely — Big Black Cadillac
083. Dolly Parton — Can't Be That Wrong
084. Mary Jo Curry — Steppin'
085. Hillary Scott And The Scott Family — The Faithful Love Of Jesus
086. John Blues Boyd — The Smoking Pig
087. Piedmont Four — Whiskey Drinkin' Woman
088. Hurricane Hearn — Waiting For You
089. The Kate Lush Band — Stranded
090. Hank Williams — I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Fleeting Moment - Rock Blues and Country Digest Wed, 22 May 2019 14:52:47 +0000
Tim Gartland - Satisfied (2019) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/5800-tim-gartland/25306-tim-gartland-satisfied-2019.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/5800-tim-gartland/25306-tim-gartland-satisfied-2019.html Tim Gartland - Satisfied (2019)

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1 Drinking for Two 3:46
2 Don't Make More Trouble 4:11
3 Blues for Free 4:12
4 Can't Paint a Prettier Picture 3:22
5 You Best Think Twice 3:29
6 Satisfied 3:26
7 Walk On 3:50
8 Why Does the Room Begin to Sway? 4:17
9 Artifacts 4:11
10 Don't Judge Me. 3:07 

Tim Gartland - lead vocals, blues harp
Kevin McKendree - keyboards
Tom West - keyboards
Jack Bruno - drums 
Steve Mackey - bass
Robert Frahm - guitar
Tom Britt - guitar
Wendy Moten - background vocals

 

Harmonica heavyweight Tim Gartland will be releasing his fourth solo record Satisfied through his Taste Good Music label on April 12th. The ten-song collection of original songs is chock-full of his usual charm, humor, bottomless baritone vocals and, of course, immense harp chops. As you can imagine, a guy who has climbed to the top of the blues scene in at least three cities of residence; Chicago, Boston and now Nashville, would have little trouble assembling a killer band to help him carry his new songs to the people.

Tim Gartland wastes no time setting the tone with opening track “Drinking for Two.” A good time, two-steppin’ tune about drinking away a bad break-up, told in his deep welcoming voice and commanding harmonica tone and style. He keeps the vibe light but makes the message a bit more serious on “Don’t Make More Trouble,” offering good advice on how to make this wobbly world a better place. Always generous, Gartland makes room for lead breaks from guitar and keyboard before he seals the deal with his harp on the run to the fade-out. “Blues for Free” is a lament both contemporary and older than the blues itself. Anchored by an organ riff that rolls under the whole affair, and elevated by some sweet backing vocals, this one manages to sound familiar and new at the same time. Honky tonk piano and a Chuck Berry shuffle power “Can’t Paint A Prettier Face,” a classic ode to that girl who can turn every head at the dance. Garland’s inventive lyrics fold like origami into this toe-tapper.

Landing in the middle of the album are perhaps the showcase tunes of the bunch. A timeless theme combined with a classic tempo and progression sets a clean table for Gartland’s warning to the potential heartbreaker standing before him in “You Best Think Twice.” This is followed by title track “Satisfied,” the most persuasive argument you’re going to hear for the simple life this year. Running through both songs his harmonica never fails to add to his message whether hopeful or melancholy. Expect to hear every blues singer, guitarist and/or harp player you love clamor to cover this pair of aces.

Tim Gartland and the band switch gears on the sly and slow “Walk On.” His harmonica cuts through the mix especially on this one as he explores his bottomless bag of harp tricks. His inventive songwriting, evident in the understated, almost conversational call-and-response chorus, adds to the already abundant charm. A buoyant reggae shuffle adds a dreamy quality to “Why Does the Room Begin to Sway.” The ode to the goddess spotted from across the bar will burrow deep in your ear thanks to the loose-but-tight keyboard flourishes and angelic backing vocals. In another lyrical tour de force, Gartland breaks your heart with a tale of good love gone bad in “Artifacts,” a full-on torch song that the entire band leans into, hard.

An unapologetic Gartland throws down the gauntlet on closing track “Don’t Judge Me.” With defiant lyrics for the haters but plenty of love and room for give-and-take between harmonica and guitar, this closer is a reminder to all that, in addition to his undisputed harp mastery, there is a formidable songwriting talent not-so-hidden behind that honey-smooth voice and all that easy charm. ---Tom O’Connor, rockandbluesmuse.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Tim Gartland Tue, 21 May 2019 14:41:55 +0000
Professor Longhair with Snooks Eaglin - Ardent Studios 1972 http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/894-profesorlonghair/25301-professor-longhair-with-snooks-eaglin-ardent-studios-1972.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/894-profesorlonghair/25301-professor-longhair-with-snooks-eaglin-ardent-studios-1972.html Professor Longhair with Snooks Eaglin - Ardent Studios 1972

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01. Mean Old World
02. Whole Lotta Lovin'
03. Sick And Tired
04. Stag-O-Lee
05. Bald Head
06. Is Everything Alright
07. Blue Jay Boogie
08. 3 O'Clock In The Morning - Snooks Eaglin solo
09. Tipitina (2) [alternate mix]
10. Junco Partner (2) [alternate take]
11. Hey Little Girl
12. Big Chief

Professor Longhair - piano & vocals
Snooks Eaglin - guitar
Joseph "Zigaboo" Modeliste - drums
George Davis – bass

June 1972 Ardent Studios, Memphis, Tennessee

 

Boiling blues and trademark African-Latin and boogie-woogie riffs were the menu when Professor Longhair brought his Crescent City music show to Baton Rouge and Memphis in 1971 and 1972, respectively. The 15 numbers on House Party New Orleans Style matched the great pianist with an esteemed array of musicians who included outstanding guitarist Snooks Eaglin on both sessions, and fine rhythm sections as well. Eaglin's flashy, inventive solos were excellent contrasts to Longhair's rippling keyboard flurries and distinctive mix of yodels, yells, cries and shouts. ---Ron Wynn, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Professor Longhair Mon, 20 May 2019 15:07:27 +0000
David 'Honeyboy' Edwards - BBC Radio 1, Andy Kershaw Show 1992 http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/1355-david-honeboy-edwards/25296-david-honeyboy-edwards-bbc-radio-1-andy-kershaw-show-1992.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/1355-david-honeboy-edwards/25296-david-honeyboy-edwards-bbc-radio-1-andy-kershaw-show-1992.html David 'Honeyboy' Edwards - BBC Radio 1, Andy Kershaw Show 1992

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1.Big Fat Mama Blues
2.Interview  
3.So Long
4.Interview
5.Catfish Blues
6.Mother In Law

Recorded 27th April 1992
Broadcast 16th May 1992

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) David 'Honeboy' Edwards Sun, 19 May 2019 15:33:38 +0000
Glenn Kaiser Band ‎– Live (2005) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/3064-glenn-kaiser/25291-glenn-kaiser-band--live-2005.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/3064-glenn-kaiser/25291-glenn-kaiser-band--live-2005.html Glenn Kaiser Band ‎– Live (2005)

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1 	Torch 	3:57
2 	Crossroads 	5:09
3 	If I Leave This World Tomorrow 	9:02
4 	Nick Of Time 	3:28
5 	Whisper 	4:19
6 	Runaway Train 	10:39
7 	Winter Sun 	4:14
8 	The Day Love Died 	5:18
9 	Do Lord 	5:51
10 	Full Time Love 	5:51
11 	In The Soul Of A Man 	6:48
12 	Queen Of My Heart 	8:15

Glenn Kaiser - guitare, vocals
Roy Montroy - bass
Ed Bialach - drums
Dave Beegle - guitar

 

The Glenn Kaiser Band (GKB) is a veteran trio from Chicago that combines classic rock and blues styles. Glenn Kaiser, formerly of Resurrection Band (Rez), is featured in this rockin' band with his powerful vocals and soulful, gritty electric and slide guitar. Roy Montroy, also of Rez, sets the groove on bass guitar and Ed Bialach on drums drives the rhythm with precision and style. These three musicians have jammed together for years and it shows in their tight, energetic performances. ---grrrrecords.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Glenn Kaiser Sat, 18 May 2019 15:33:04 +0000
Alberta Hunter ‎– The Legendary Alberta Hunter: '34 London Sessions (1981) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/968-alberta-hunter/25286-alberta-hunter--the-legendary-alberta-hunter-34-london-sessions-1981.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/968-alberta-hunter/25286-alberta-hunter--the-legendary-alberta-hunter-34-london-sessions-1981.html Alberta Hunter ‎– The Legendary Alberta Hunter: '34 London Sessions (1981)

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A1 	Two Cigarettes In The Dark	2:55
A2 	What Shall I Do?	2:39
A3 	Soon	3:01
A4 	Where The Mountains Meet The Sea	2:50
A5 	A Lonely Singing Fool	2:43
A6 	Long May We Love	2:55
B1 	Miss Otis Regrets (She's Unable To Lunch Today)	3:10
B2 	Be Still My Heart	3:02
B3 	Stars Fell On Alabama	2:56
B4 	Two Little Flies On A Lump Of Sugar	2:47
B5 	I Travel Alone	3:00

Alto Saxophone, Guitar – Noel "Chappie" D'Amato
Alto Saxophone, Violin – Stan Andrews
Bass – Tiny Stock
Clarinet, Alto Saxophone, Flute – E.O. Pogson
Clarinet, Tenor Saxophone, Oboe – Allan Warner
Conductor, Trumpet – Jack Jackson
Drums – Percy Hampton
Orchestra – Jack Jackson & His Orchestra
Piano – Harry Rubens
Trombone – Eric Tann, Tony Thorpe
Trumpet – Freddy Mann, Harry Macfarlane
Violin – Colly Eisner, Dave Esher
Vocals - Alberta Hunter

 

This handsome album is a bit of an oddity. Alberta Hunter, famous as a jazz-oriented blues singer in the 1920s, reinvented herself as a sophisticated stage singer in London. Her 11 recordings with Jack Jackson's society dance orchestra in 1934 are very straight, outside of jazz and somewhat dated today. Whether it be "Two Cigarettes in the Dark," "Miss Otis Regrets" or "Two Little Flies on a Lump of Sugar," Hunter interprets the romantic ballads like a cabaret singer. So, although this reissue was perfectly done (with extensive liner notes), there is little here to interest jazz listeners. ---Scott Yanow, AllMusic Reviews

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Alberta Hunter Fri, 17 May 2019 15:02:45 +0000